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How Much Does It Cost To Fix An Audi Transmission?

How Much Does It Cost To Fix An Audi Transmission
How much does an Audi A4 transmission replacement cost? My gearshift has been giving me problems, so I finally took it to a mechanic. They said it’s actually an issue with my transmission, and that I need a new one! How much does an Audi A4 transmission replacement cost? In general, an Audi A4 transmission replacement costs between $3,930 and $4,420 or more, with the exact price depending on vehicle specifics like model year, location, and extent of damage to the transmission itself.

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Do Audi have transmission problems?

Audi automatic transmission problems – Problems with your Audi transmission normally come to light in one of these ways:

Dashboard indicator flashing or lit up Harsh shifting or binding up Surging sensation when accelerating from a standstill Loss of reverse gear (a common problem on Audi A4 CVT) Loss of gearshifts (stuck in one gear) Delay in engagement of forward and reverse gears Surging, vibrating sensation at low speeds with low throttle opening.

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Is it worth fixing a transmission?

1. What is the current worth of your vehicle? – As mentioned briefly earlier, before you decide whether to replace your transmission, compare the cost of replacing it to the total (current) worth of the vehicle. A brand-new transmission costs anything from $1,000 to $7,000+,

Therefore, if the current worth of your vehicle ranges from $8,000 to $10,000, replacing the transmission will be worth it. But if your vehicle is under or within the transmission range, it won’t make much sense to replace its transmission. The best way out is to scrap and sell off your vehicle in order to get a new car.

Transmission Problems on Volkswagen and Audi: How to Fix Yourself – Fast and Easy!

Moreover, the overall cost of replacing a vehicle’s transmission depends primarily on the type, model, or make you own. For instance, replacing the transmission of an exotic or luxury vehicle will cost you $10,000 or more. But that of a truck will cost up to $3,000, while a sedan’s new transmission does not usually cost more than $2,800.
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How long do Audi transmissions last?

Transmission – Audi transmissions are engineered to last about 300,000 miles. To ensure your Audi’s transmission lasts as long as possible, you should perform regular transmission fluid checks, as well as t ransmission fluid service, every 40,000 miles,
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Can a Audi transmission be rebuilt?

Audi Transmission Rebuild Services – Sometimes it makes more sense to have your transmission completely rebuilt. This can be a complex process but is a routine job for ASE certified technicians. A complete rebuild of your Audi transmission, all or most of the internal parts in your vehicle’s transmission will be replaced with new parts.
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Is it cheaper to rebuild a transmission or replace it?

Transmission Fix Options – The first option to fixing a transmission is to have it “repaired.” Having the option to do a repair is less likely because it can’t be done if the parts that are going bad have caused too much damage. When repairing a transmission you are basically replacing the minimum amount of parts so that the transmission is brought back to good working condition.

This typically costs less, so it is smart to get the right diagnosis of your transmission the first time around. The next option is to have your transmission “replaced.” This means that you will completely replace the entire transmission and this can be very costly. There are some downfalls to choosing this option.

The last option is having your transmission “rebuilt.” This means that the parts that are completely worn out will be rebuilt one by one and may not cost as much as a complete replace.
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What is the most common problem with Audi?

Audi’s are prized possessions but like most other luxury cars they have common maintenance issues. Some of these issues are unique to Audi but that shouldn’t stop you from enjoying this classic piece of beauty. Below are 7 of the most common issues with Audi, their solutions and cost of repairing them.

Issues with Electrical Components Failure of electrical components is a common issue with Audi. Owners have reported that the most common problems are failure of digital dashboard display or console, erratic lights and failed tailed lamps. Simple replacement of the components with OE equipment only works. Plus Audi also provides warranty cover which means you won’t have to pay a lot for replacement and repairs. Failure of Ignition Coil or Spark Plug Failure of the Ignition coil of an Audi is its single most common mechanical problem. It is also among the prime reason behind engine misfire. The solution is installment of good quality OE spark plugs and tuning of the engine to factory specs. Replacement of Catalytic Converters Catalytic converters fail primarily due to clogging or carbon build-up which solidifies and jams the exhaust flow. Replacement of the catalytic converter isn’t a long term solution. Make sure that the mechanic gets down to finding the real cause. Keep the engine fine-tuned and maintain it regularly to prevent catalytic converter failure. Exhaust Gas Re-Circulation (EGR) EGR is primarily a system that lowers the temperatures in the combustion chamber. The problem that plagues EGR is carbon build-up and wear & tear. Oil Leaks Oil leaks in an Audi can result from two places- 1- valve cover gasket and 2- Camshaft Tensioner. The solution is replacement of either or both of the parts depending on which one is leaking. Replacing Oxygen Sensor Replacement of oxygen sensor shouldn’t be a tough job and most of the times owner treat it as a Do-it-Yourself activity. Loose fuel caps Loose fuel caps have been one of the underrated problems for low mileage. Make sure that you tighten the fuel caps after re-fuelling or replace it if damaged. These small things can add up to the mileage of your car.

Most of the issues that we discussed can be solved by regular maintenance of the car. Take care of your vehicle and it will be your trusted companion for years. Happy Driving!
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Should I fix my transmission or trade it in?

Should You Repair The Transmission Before Trading It In? – The short answer is: yes. A vehicle without a working transmission is not worth much more than its weight in scrap. Therefore, in order to get the best trade-in value for your car, it’s in your best interest to repair it — as long as that’s the only thing wrong with the car, and it’s in relatively good condition otherwise.
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Can transmissions last forever?

How long does a transmission last? | Jerry How long should a new transmission last before it needs to be replaced? I got a new transmission about a year ago and it’s already starting to have problems. A new transmission should certainly last longer than a year! With proper care and maintenance, a new transmission can last for ​​300,000 miles or more,

  1. Since the average American drives 10,000 to 15,000 miles per year, a new transmission could last you up to 30 years under the right conditions.
  2. If you’re already experiencing problems with your new transmission, you should right away.
  3. It’s possible that there’s something else going on with your car, or that your new transmission was installed incorrectly.

Either way, a malfunctioning transmission can be dangerous, so it’s important to get the issue fixed! Concerned about your car breaking down in the meantime? Try a roadside assistance membership with, Jerry’s roadside assistance membership protects you with its nationwide network of 55,000+ service providers for as low as $4.16 a month.
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Are Audis expensive to fix?

– Audis are expensive cars to maintain. According to RepairPal, the average annual Audi repair cost is $987. This is much higher than the average across all brands, which is $652. Audi’s regular maintenance costs are also likely to be a bit higher than most brands because Audis are luxury vehicles that use expensive specialty parts.
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How much is a brand new Audi transmission?

2022 Audi A4 Transmission Cost – The cost of a new 2022 Audi A4 transmission could be over $3,500 depending on the car, however, transmission services such as fluid changes and a transmission fluid flush are considerably less expensive, in some cases costing less than $150.
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How long will a car last with a rebuilt transmission?

A rebuilt transmission is a collection of parts that must work together in perfect harmony. There can be over 1,000 individual parts that range from tiny springs to big heavy gears. When a transmission rebuild is performed, new ‘soft parts’ like seals and clutch discs are mixed with existing ‘hard parts’ like gears and pumps.

On average, a rebuilt transmission is expected to last between 30,000 – 50,000 miles. If the work is done extremely well and regular maintenance is performed, a transmission rebuild can last as long as the original transmission (120,000 – 200,000 miles on average). There are however, a number of things that factor into rebuilt transmission reliability like the quality of the rebuild, the condition of the transmission that was rebuilt and maintenance/driving style.

Need a replacement transmission? Get an estimate for replacement transmissions and local installation. Look up your transmission model by vehicle make and model.
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How much does it cost to rebuild transmission?

Average transmission repair costs range from $300 to $1,400. For example, if your manual transmission needs a new clutch, you can reasonably expect to pay around $800 to $1,500. On the other hand, transmission replacement is one of the most expensive repairs you can get. Replacements can range from $1,800 to $3,400.
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Does replacing transmission add value to car?

Benefits of a Transmission Rebuild – All Tune And Lube When your car starts having trouble, your mind can go to very dark places, full of expense and worry. If you hear that your transmission has failed, you may be devastated! A new transmission can be costly, and if you’re not ready to replace your car just yet, you may not know what to do.

Rebuilding your transmission costs less than buying a new car. A new car either requires a tremendous outlay of cash, or payments that will need to be added into your monthly budget. A new transmission can cost several thousands of dollars, so while rebuilding your transmission isn’t cheap, it’s much less expensive than your other options. A rebuilt transmission can add years to your vehicle’s lifespan, When you’re considering your options after a transmission failure, you might think about buying a used transmission to avoid the cost of a new one. This is a hassle, though, and can take a long time. Then, too, you have no way of knowing whether your used transmission will last, and used transmissions don’t typically come with a worthy warranty. A rebuilt transmission will extend the life of your vehicle, because when the worn parts are replaced, the transmission becomes “good as new”. Another benefit is that when it comes time to trade in your car, you’ll get a higher price for it if the transmission is still in good shape. So, rebuilding a transmission not only saves you money on upfront costs, but it also saves you money on your next car by providing a higher trade-in value. A second warranty guarantees quality. A warranty is great news because it means you’ll get your money’s worth from your rebuilt transmission. You’ll have confidence that if anything goes wrong with the rebuilt transmission, it will be covered by the warranty. It’s quicker than buying a new transmission. When you buy a new transmission, you must order it and wait for it to arrive, which could take a week or so. Once it does arrive, you’ll wait again while it’s being installed. A used transmission takes even longer- you have to locate it before you can buy it. Rebuilding a transmission, on the other hand, only takes a few days. Your car will be up and running in no time, with your new transmission running smoothly.

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Are Audis reliable at high mileage?

4. Want a cheaper option? Opt for high mileage – If you are on a tight budget and want something cheaper, the high mileage vehicles should be your preferred option. Most high mileage vehicles are sold at a very low price and you are likely to land a lucrative deal.

You can purchase a high quality Audi vehicle at a low price knowing that even with high miles it can be a dependable daily driver. For more information on mileage and its impact on the state of the car, give us a call today and we will help explain the pros and cons. Visit our Audi Richfield location today and talk to our experienced sales staff who will help you understand the mileage issue completely.

Besides explaining the significance of mileage, we can help you get your dream Audi vehicle at a very good rate. Contact us today for the best possible deal in Bloomington, Woodbury, Inver Grove Heights, Prior Lake, and St. Louis Park!
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Which Audi engines have problems?

What is the problem? How Much Does It Cost To Fix An Audi Transmission The early version of the TFSI gasoline engines found in the A5, A4 and Q5 have an inherent design fault which leads to high consumption of oil. The base problem seems to relate to the piston rings, which allow small amounts of oil to leak round the pistons into the cylinders, where it burns and therefore leads to high oil consumption. The typical way drivers become aware of this is when the ‘add one litre of oil’ notice comes up on the dashboard. When this comes up you don’t need to immediately stop, but you should add a litre of correct grade oil as promptly as you can. Over time this problem gets worse, and the range you can drive before needing to add oil steadily drops. In advanced cases there can be noticeable smoke from the exhaust under heavy acceleration, and it is also known to damage the actual cylinders themselves, causing scoring in the bores. One theory is that these grooves cause more and more oil to leak around the pistons, hence the problem gets progressively worse. Note that the Audi specification for the 2.0 engines allows for a quart of oil to be used every 1,000 miles, and they will not consider this level of usage to be a fault. This is written in the manual if you look in the section on oil. However, many 2.0 TFSI owners routinely get only around 500-600 miles, which is definitely out of spec. (Other engines may have different specifications, please check your manual to confirm) What engines are affected? The 2.0 and 1.8 TFSI engines prior to 2012. Engine codes known to be affected include CAEB, CDNC and CNDC (list being updated). The problem seems to have been corrected when the facelift was released. But all A5 TFSI engines before that, i.e.2008 – 2012, are susceptible. The overwhelming majority of reports are for the 2.0, but 1.8 TFSI is also affected. There have been far fewer reports from 1.8 owners and information is harder to find. It is unclear whether this is because the 1.8 is less susceptible to the problem, or there are simply less 1.8 engines in existence. Diesels engines are not affected, but there have been isolated reports of the larger petrol engines such as those found in the S5 also having an oil problem, but it’s unclear if this is the same issue. Again, S5’s are far less common than 2.0 TFSI A5s, so that may be the reason there are few reports of this. The following advice should be generally applicable for any owner with oil problems, but is primarily based on the experience of 2.0 owners. If you have a different engine and find information that contradicts this FAQ, please post below and I will update. How can I tell if I have the problem? It’s fairly easy to test. Top up your oil then reset your odometer. When the one litre message comes up if you’ve done less than 1200 miles you have the problem. In practise if you are getting anything under 2000 miles you probably have the problem, but Audi won’t acknowledge it until you get below 1200 miles. (this is correct for 2.0 engines, I am not sure the spec mileage for other engines) However, for Audi to do any corrective work you need to have an official consumption test done by a main dealer. For this they will drain your car of oil, then fill it up with a carefully measured volume so they know exactly how much is in the engine. You are then asked to drive 500 miles, or until the one litre warning comes on, whichever is first. At that point you return to the dealer, they drain the engine again and carefully measure how much is left. In this way they can get an extremely accurate measurement of the oil used over the distance. If more than half a quart has been used over 500 miles, the car has failed the test and they will recommend a repair. It is essential that you not top up the oil during the consumption test, as it will invalidate the result. Audi dealers will typically charge $80-125 for the consumption test, although this is sometimes waived for goodwill. Can I ignore it? For a long time, especially when Audi wasn’t offering much in the way of financial contribution, many TFSI owners took the view that it wasn’t harming the engine, and buying a 4 quart bottle of oil every few months was a lot cheaper than the repair. However, it has now been confirmed that the problem does harm the engine, it causes scoring and grooves to be worn into the cylinder bores. In the short term these make the problem worse, longer term this could eventually cause the engine to fail. So you are strongly advised not to just ignore the issue. Can it be fixed? There are three known solutions offered by Audi. Stage 1 This involves replacing the crank case and updating the engine management software to the latest release. While it appears to reduce the problem in some cases, and is sometimes offered alongside the consumption test as an initial fix, it does not seem to be a permanent solution and Audi does not seem to be offering it very often anymore. Audi dealers typically charge $200 for this but it is sometimes offered free with the test as goodwill. Stage 2 This involves removing the engine from the car, stripping it down to the cylinders and replacing the pistons, piston rings and con rods. It takes around 12 hours to do this, so it is not a trivial piece of work. Provided there is no other damage the stage 2 solution will completely fix the problem. Audi dealers typically charge $5,000 – $6,00 for this. However, before conducting a stage 2 fix, the dealer should check the cylinders to see if they have been damaged. This is done either by stripping the engine, or by putting an endoscope in through the spark plug sockets. If the bores are damaged the stage 2 fix is not suitable as the grooves will still cause oil to leak around the rings. Stage 3 The final repair option is a completely new or good quality used engine, and this is the only fix that will work if the cylinders have been damaged. This is a permanent fix, the replacement engine will not have the same problem. Audi dealers typically charge $12,000 – $14,000 for a new engine this. Note that both the Stage 2 and 3 are permanent solutions, neither is more effective than the other, and there is no requirement to have the stage 2 before you have the stage 3, in fact that would only happen if the dealer missed there being engine damage in the cylinders. The only thing that decides whether you need the stage 2 or 3 is the presence of scoring damage in the cylinders. Other solutions. Some drivers have reported that using different grades of oil, or engine treatments such as STP, can improve the problem. But while there might be some small incremental improvement, there is no evidence that they significantly reduce the problem or provide a fix. Crucially, Audi doesn’t seem to have ever recommended these solutions, and given how expensive the other options are it seems likely they would have at least tried it if there was any chance it might work. What are Audi doing about this? For a long time Audi dealers were quite reluctant to admit there was any problem, and while they did provide the various fixes listed above, unless the car was still in warranty the owners were typically requested to make a significant contribution to the cost, sometimes to the tune of several thousand pounds. After market warranties also didn’t seem to cover the issue as it was either categorised as a manufacturer defect or else wear and tear. This left many owners facing having to live with the problem due to the huge expense of rectifying it. However, in 2014 a class action lawsuit was brought against Audi in America, and while they have not formally admitted liability, they have made a settlement offer to American owners. This extends the manufacturers engine warranty to 8 years or 80,000 miles, and will fully cover the cost of the required repairs up to and including a new engine. American TFSI owners should read this website to find out details of this and how they can claim. Apparently as a result of this finding in America, as of 2015 Audi in other countries appears to have had a change of heart and are now making 100% contributions to remedial work for affected cars that meet their criteria. In March 2015 I personally had the stage 3 fix, i.e. a whole new engine, provided completely free of charge despite my car being two years outside of its manufacturer’s warranty. In June 2015 Audi UK made the following statement in response to an article on BBC Watchdog about the problem. It essentially confirms that they are contributing, but that certain service criteria need to be met. (original statement here https://www.audi.co.uk/about-audi/lajune-2015.html ) Quote: Audi UK is committed to investigating and swiftly resolving any technical issues relating to our cars which are reported to us through our network. As we have stated previously, a low percentage of older 2.0 TFSI engines fitted to certain models have been exceeding the factory oil consumption tolerance of 0.5 litres per 1,000 kilometres (approx.620 miles). Changes were made to the production tolerances of the pistons and rings in this engine from mid-2011 onwards, and customers with 2.0 TFSI cars produced after this date should not have any cause for concern. The comprehensive Audi UK Warranty (3 years/60,000 miles) covering all new Audi vehicles has already resolved the majority of these cases at no cost to the customer. For remaining affected customers with cars that are no longer covered by this warranty, we have a policy in place to resolve issues on a case-by-case basis. This revised policy has been in force nationally since the beginning of the year and applies to new and retrospective cases. Qualification criteria are applied in each individual case to confirm that the vehicle has been serviced in accordance with the owner’s handbook by an Audi Centre or other professional workshop which follows the Audi Service quality standards. We invite all Audi customers who have any questions or concerns relating to newly discovered or previously reported oil consumption with 2.0 TFSI engines to contact their local Audi Centre. Alternatively, our advisors will be available until 10pm on Thursday 4 June, and thereafter from 8am to 8pm, by calling 0800 093 0110 free of charge from landlines*. *Chargeable from mobile phones. What are the criteria for getting the fix for free? There appear to be two main criteria.1. You have a full Audi Service History 2. You engine has not been in any way modified, e.g. a performance remap or any other after market modification If you have a less than perfect service history, Audi may reduce their contribution and you will need to make up the difference. However, there is some evidence that if you can produce garage receipts showing that the correct grade of oil was used, this may mitigate against this. The relevant line in the Audi press statement is “the vehicle has been serviced in accordance with the owner’s handbook by an AudiCentre or other professional workshop which follows the Audi Service quality standards.”, so if you have used an independent garage you may need to provide evidence that they followed Audi standards. An engine remap or similar after market modification will likely cause Audi to refuse all contribution and it will be difficult to argue against this. It’s likely to be hard work though and there are obviously no guarantees. Another unofficial factor appears to be the particular dealer you go to. It seems that Audi expect the dealers to contribute to the cost as well, and some dealers seem more willing to undertake the work than others. Your personal history with the dealer may also help here, if you have had several services and other work done by the main dealer, they are more likely to help. But if you turn up with a problem car and it’s the first time you’ve ever spoken to them, you may have a harder time. I have an affected car and I’m pretty sure it’s out of spec, what should I do? If you are in the US, read the class action page linked here. Oil Consumption Settlement > mainpage > Home In other countries, take it to your local dealer and say you have an oil consumption problem and would like them to look at it. BE POLITE, it is the dealer who will apply to Audi on your behalf for the contribution, so you want them on your side. If you go in demanding your rights, quoting law suits and generally being a pain, like any other human they are less likely to go the extra mile working on your behalf with Audi. You can always bang the table later on if the contribution isn’t what you want. I asked very politely and their opening offer to me was a completely free replacement engine without any negotiation required at all. If the dealer doesn’t cooperate, either consider another dealer or else speak to Audi direct. You may want to ask in this thread for a recommendation of a helpful dealer or who to speak to at Audi. However, the issue is getting more and more profile and publicity, having been featured in the UK national press, and more recently on the BBC Watchdog consumer affairs program. This should lead to more and more dealers following the Audi line and fixing the problem. I already had my car fixed a year or so ago, and paid a hefty contribution Some owners who previously paid large contributions towards a fix are now understandably upset that work they paid for is now being provided free. When this issue was featured on Watchdog, four owners were shown who had previously made contributions, and as part of their response to the article Audi agreed to refund all four of them. So if you previously paid to have this problem fix, you should politely go and speak to the dealer who did the work, quoting other examples of owners who have had the same work fixed for free. It would appear there is a very good chance you will be issued a refund. I am thinking of buying a pre-2012 Petrol TFSI car and heard about this issue, what should I do? Many owners who realised they had this problem but didn’t know or believe that Audi would fix it have part exchanged their car to be rid of it, so there is likely to be quite a large number of affected cars in the used market. If you are considering buying any pre-2012 car with this engine for your own sake you should work on the assumption that it has the problem and it is likely to get worse. Bear in mind that even on badly affected cars you have to drive several hundred miles to be able to diagnose the issue, so dealers who have taken these cars in part exchange could well be completely oblivious to it and you can’t rely on any dealer assurances. Although a written assurance would be useful if you later want to make a claim. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t buy the car, and in fact you might be able to get quite a bargain as a result. But keep the following in mind.1. Don’t touch any example that doesn’t have a full Audi Service History, or at least negotiate a very serious discount, e.g. $4k to cover the potential contribution 2. Don’t touch any car that you think might have been remapped or modified 3. Even if the car appears to be on the level, be aware that you might have to go through several months of hassle to get the problem resolved, and as with any used purchase there is always the risk that something will crop up (e.g. a remap or dodgy service) that leaves you needing to make a contribution. Use the normal rules of used purchase to minimise this risk, i.e. a dealer is safer, an Audi dealer safer still, and if its a private sale then buyer beware!. If you are at all in doubt, or just don’t want the hassle, walk away from any car with this engine. Either go for a diesel, or wait a year or so until the Facelift models come down to your price point. Don’t risk getting stuck with a dying engine that Audi won’t touch and you can’t afford to fix.
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Do Audis have alot of mechanical problems?

Conclusion: How reliable is Audi? – As has already been mentioned, Audi manufactures many different models and each one comes with both good and bad points. In this article we have looked at some of the more popular models available and mentioned issues that you may encounter.

They aren’t the most reliable brand on the market, experiencing issues with their technology, engines and axle and suspension, but Audi isn’t the only manufacturer that has these issues, and many owners will attest that they have had their vehicles for several years and never had any problems. When it comes to scores from ReliabilityIndex and the average rating rewarded by Which? Audi is a brand that is in the middle.

It’s not up there in reliability with Honda and Lexus, but it also isn’t right at the bottom of the scale with some other manufacturers. Though Audi doesn’t score at the top of the list when it comes to reliability, it is a brand that consistently produces vehicles that score incredibly well when it comes to build, performance and style. How Much Does It Cost To Fix An Audi Transmission
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Which Audi engines have problems?

What is the problem? How Much Does It Cost To Fix An Audi Transmission The early version of the TFSI gasoline engines found in the A5, A4 and Q5 have an inherent design fault which leads to high consumption of oil. The base problem seems to relate to the piston rings, which allow small amounts of oil to leak round the pistons into the cylinders, where it burns and therefore leads to high oil consumption. The typical way drivers become aware of this is when the ‘add one litre of oil’ notice comes up on the dashboard. When this comes up you don’t need to immediately stop, but you should add a litre of correct grade oil as promptly as you can. Over time this problem gets worse, and the range you can drive before needing to add oil steadily drops. In advanced cases there can be noticeable smoke from the exhaust under heavy acceleration, and it is also known to damage the actual cylinders themselves, causing scoring in the bores. One theory is that these grooves cause more and more oil to leak around the pistons, hence the problem gets progressively worse. Note that the Audi specification for the 2.0 engines allows for a quart of oil to be used every 1,000 miles, and they will not consider this level of usage to be a fault. This is written in the manual if you look in the section on oil. However, many 2.0 TFSI owners routinely get only around 500-600 miles, which is definitely out of spec. (Other engines may have different specifications, please check your manual to confirm) What engines are affected? The 2.0 and 1.8 TFSI engines prior to 2012. Engine codes known to be affected include CAEB, CDNC and CNDC (list being updated). The problem seems to have been corrected when the facelift was released. But all A5 TFSI engines before that, i.e.2008 – 2012, are susceptible. The overwhelming majority of reports are for the 2.0, but 1.8 TFSI is also affected. There have been far fewer reports from 1.8 owners and information is harder to find. It is unclear whether this is because the 1.8 is less susceptible to the problem, or there are simply less 1.8 engines in existence. Diesels engines are not affected, but there have been isolated reports of the larger petrol engines such as those found in the S5 also having an oil problem, but it’s unclear if this is the same issue. Again, S5’s are far less common than 2.0 TFSI A5s, so that may be the reason there are few reports of this. The following advice should be generally applicable for any owner with oil problems, but is primarily based on the experience of 2.0 owners. If you have a different engine and find information that contradicts this FAQ, please post below and I will update. How can I tell if I have the problem? It’s fairly easy to test. Top up your oil then reset your odometer. When the one litre message comes up if you’ve done less than 1200 miles you have the problem. In practise if you are getting anything under 2000 miles you probably have the problem, but Audi won’t acknowledge it until you get below 1200 miles. (this is correct for 2.0 engines, I am not sure the spec mileage for other engines) However, for Audi to do any corrective work you need to have an official consumption test done by a main dealer. For this they will drain your car of oil, then fill it up with a carefully measured volume so they know exactly how much is in the engine. You are then asked to drive 500 miles, or until the one litre warning comes on, whichever is first. At that point you return to the dealer, they drain the engine again and carefully measure how much is left. In this way they can get an extremely accurate measurement of the oil used over the distance. If more than half a quart has been used over 500 miles, the car has failed the test and they will recommend a repair. It is essential that you not top up the oil during the consumption test, as it will invalidate the result. Audi dealers will typically charge $80-125 for the consumption test, although this is sometimes waived for goodwill. Can I ignore it? For a long time, especially when Audi wasn’t offering much in the way of financial contribution, many TFSI owners took the view that it wasn’t harming the engine, and buying a 4 quart bottle of oil every few months was a lot cheaper than the repair. However, it has now been confirmed that the problem does harm the engine, it causes scoring and grooves to be worn into the cylinder bores. In the short term these make the problem worse, longer term this could eventually cause the engine to fail. So you are strongly advised not to just ignore the issue. Can it be fixed? There are three known solutions offered by Audi. Stage 1 This involves replacing the crank case and updating the engine management software to the latest release. While it appears to reduce the problem in some cases, and is sometimes offered alongside the consumption test as an initial fix, it does not seem to be a permanent solution and Audi does not seem to be offering it very often anymore. Audi dealers typically charge $200 for this but it is sometimes offered free with the test as goodwill. Stage 2 This involves removing the engine from the car, stripping it down to the cylinders and replacing the pistons, piston rings and con rods. It takes around 12 hours to do this, so it is not a trivial piece of work. Provided there is no other damage the stage 2 solution will completely fix the problem. Audi dealers typically charge $5,000 – $6,00 for this. However, before conducting a stage 2 fix, the dealer should check the cylinders to see if they have been damaged. This is done either by stripping the engine, or by putting an endoscope in through the spark plug sockets. If the bores are damaged the stage 2 fix is not suitable as the grooves will still cause oil to leak around the rings. Stage 3 The final repair option is a completely new or good quality used engine, and this is the only fix that will work if the cylinders have been damaged. This is a permanent fix, the replacement engine will not have the same problem. Audi dealers typically charge $12,000 – $14,000 for a new engine this. Note that both the Stage 2 and 3 are permanent solutions, neither is more effective than the other, and there is no requirement to have the stage 2 before you have the stage 3, in fact that would only happen if the dealer missed there being engine damage in the cylinders. The only thing that decides whether you need the stage 2 or 3 is the presence of scoring damage in the cylinders. Other solutions. Some drivers have reported that using different grades of oil, or engine treatments such as STP, can improve the problem. But while there might be some small incremental improvement, there is no evidence that they significantly reduce the problem or provide a fix. Crucially, Audi doesn’t seem to have ever recommended these solutions, and given how expensive the other options are it seems likely they would have at least tried it if there was any chance it might work. What are Audi doing about this? For a long time Audi dealers were quite reluctant to admit there was any problem, and while they did provide the various fixes listed above, unless the car was still in warranty the owners were typically requested to make a significant contribution to the cost, sometimes to the tune of several thousand pounds. After market warranties also didn’t seem to cover the issue as it was either categorised as a manufacturer defect or else wear and tear. This left many owners facing having to live with the problem due to the huge expense of rectifying it. However, in 2014 a class action lawsuit was brought against Audi in America, and while they have not formally admitted liability, they have made a settlement offer to American owners. This extends the manufacturers engine warranty to 8 years or 80,000 miles, and will fully cover the cost of the required repairs up to and including a new engine. American TFSI owners should read this website to find out details of this and how they can claim. Apparently as a result of this finding in America, as of 2015 Audi in other countries appears to have had a change of heart and are now making 100% contributions to remedial work for affected cars that meet their criteria. In March 2015 I personally had the stage 3 fix, i.e. a whole new engine, provided completely free of charge despite my car being two years outside of its manufacturer’s warranty. In June 2015 Audi UK made the following statement in response to an article on BBC Watchdog about the problem. It essentially confirms that they are contributing, but that certain service criteria need to be met. (original statement here https://www.audi.co.uk/about-audi/lajune-2015.html ) Quote: Audi UK is committed to investigating and swiftly resolving any technical issues relating to our cars which are reported to us through our network. As we have stated previously, a low percentage of older 2.0 TFSI engines fitted to certain models have been exceeding the factory oil consumption tolerance of 0.5 litres per 1,000 kilometres (approx.620 miles). Changes were made to the production tolerances of the pistons and rings in this engine from mid-2011 onwards, and customers with 2.0 TFSI cars produced after this date should not have any cause for concern. The comprehensive Audi UK Warranty (3 years/60,000 miles) covering all new Audi vehicles has already resolved the majority of these cases at no cost to the customer. For remaining affected customers with cars that are no longer covered by this warranty, we have a policy in place to resolve issues on a case-by-case basis. This revised policy has been in force nationally since the beginning of the year and applies to new and retrospective cases. Qualification criteria are applied in each individual case to confirm that the vehicle has been serviced in accordance with the owner’s handbook by an Audi Centre or other professional workshop which follows the Audi Service quality standards. We invite all Audi customers who have any questions or concerns relating to newly discovered or previously reported oil consumption with 2.0 TFSI engines to contact their local Audi Centre. Alternatively, our advisors will be available until 10pm on Thursday 4 June, and thereafter from 8am to 8pm, by calling 0800 093 0110 free of charge from landlines*. *Chargeable from mobile phones. What are the criteria for getting the fix for free? There appear to be two main criteria.1. You have a full Audi Service History 2. You engine has not been in any way modified, e.g. a performance remap or any other after market modification If you have a less than perfect service history, Audi may reduce their contribution and you will need to make up the difference. However, there is some evidence that if you can produce garage receipts showing that the correct grade of oil was used, this may mitigate against this. The relevant line in the Audi press statement is “the vehicle has been serviced in accordance with the owner’s handbook by an AudiCentre or other professional workshop which follows the Audi Service quality standards.”, so if you have used an independent garage you may need to provide evidence that they followed Audi standards. An engine remap or similar after market modification will likely cause Audi to refuse all contribution and it will be difficult to argue against this. It’s likely to be hard work though and there are obviously no guarantees. Another unofficial factor appears to be the particular dealer you go to. It seems that Audi expect the dealers to contribute to the cost as well, and some dealers seem more willing to undertake the work than others. Your personal history with the dealer may also help here, if you have had several services and other work done by the main dealer, they are more likely to help. But if you turn up with a problem car and it’s the first time you’ve ever spoken to them, you may have a harder time. I have an affected car and I’m pretty sure it’s out of spec, what should I do? If you are in the US, read the class action page linked here. Oil Consumption Settlement > mainpage > Home In other countries, take it to your local dealer and say you have an oil consumption problem and would like them to look at it. BE POLITE, it is the dealer who will apply to Audi on your behalf for the contribution, so you want them on your side. If you go in demanding your rights, quoting law suits and generally being a pain, like any other human they are less likely to go the extra mile working on your behalf with Audi. You can always bang the table later on if the contribution isn’t what you want. I asked very politely and their opening offer to me was a completely free replacement engine without any negotiation required at all. If the dealer doesn’t cooperate, either consider another dealer or else speak to Audi direct. You may want to ask in this thread for a recommendation of a helpful dealer or who to speak to at Audi. However, the issue is getting more and more profile and publicity, having been featured in the UK national press, and more recently on the BBC Watchdog consumer affairs program. This should lead to more and more dealers following the Audi line and fixing the problem. I already had my car fixed a year or so ago, and paid a hefty contribution Some owners who previously paid large contributions towards a fix are now understandably upset that work they paid for is now being provided free. When this issue was featured on Watchdog, four owners were shown who had previously made contributions, and as part of their response to the article Audi agreed to refund all four of them. So if you previously paid to have this problem fix, you should politely go and speak to the dealer who did the work, quoting other examples of owners who have had the same work fixed for free. It would appear there is a very good chance you will be issued a refund. I am thinking of buying a pre-2012 Petrol TFSI car and heard about this issue, what should I do? Many owners who realised they had this problem but didn’t know or believe that Audi would fix it have part exchanged their car to be rid of it, so there is likely to be quite a large number of affected cars in the used market. If you are considering buying any pre-2012 car with this engine for your own sake you should work on the assumption that it has the problem and it is likely to get worse. Bear in mind that even on badly affected cars you have to drive several hundred miles to be able to diagnose the issue, so dealers who have taken these cars in part exchange could well be completely oblivious to it and you can’t rely on any dealer assurances. Although a written assurance would be useful if you later want to make a claim. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t buy the car, and in fact you might be able to get quite a bargain as a result. But keep the following in mind.1. Don’t touch any example that doesn’t have a full Audi Service History, or at least negotiate a very serious discount, e.g. $4k to cover the potential contribution 2. Don’t touch any car that you think might have been remapped or modified 3. Even if the car appears to be on the level, be aware that you might have to go through several months of hassle to get the problem resolved, and as with any used purchase there is always the risk that something will crop up (e.g. a remap or dodgy service) that leaves you needing to make a contribution. Use the normal rules of used purchase to minimise this risk, i.e. a dealer is safer, an Audi dealer safer still, and if its a private sale then buyer beware!. If you are at all in doubt, or just don’t want the hassle, walk away from any car with this engine. Either go for a diesel, or wait a year or so until the Facelift models come down to your price point. Don’t risk getting stuck with a dying engine that Audi won’t touch and you can’t afford to fix.
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Are Audi automatics reliable?

According to our latest Reliability Survey, the current Audi A3 is a highly dependable car ; petrol models scored 96.8% and diesel models scored 96.6%, with only 1% of owners reporting issues with the gearbox.
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