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How To Clear Bmw Fault Codes?

How To Clear Bmw Fault Codes
BMW CC-ID codes readout –

  1. Turn the ignition on.
  2. Dismiss or wait for all warning and failure messages to disappear.
  3. Use left stalk to navigate to “CHECK” submenu. Here you can cycle through all messages.
  4. Press BC button on the left stalk and hold it pressed for 5 seconds.
  5. Release the button when BMW CC-ID codes appear on the bottom display.
  6. Again cycle through messages. Now you can see failure and waring code under each message.
  7. Compare message number with the list below to find out more specific what caused the warning or failure message to show on your BMWs instrument cluster.

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How do you reset BMW faults?

How to reset certain error lights

01-20-2020, 03:01 PM #
Brigadier General Drives: 21 X5 40i, 18 GTi, Snowblower Join Date: Nov 2014 Location: NY How to reset certain error lights An ABS wheel speed sensor decided to give it up and set off a number of error idiot lights. I’ve replaced the defective sensor and have regained full power steering and throttle, which were subdued automatically as a way for the car to somewhat protect itself. Now that its done, I would like to reset the error lights but don’t have the tools to do it. Is there any way to do it via the car, like press this and hold that or ??? – ABS light is on – Brake light is on – Chassis Stabilization error msg is displayed – Engine light is on – DSC light is on, Attached Images

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01-20-2020, 04:18 PM # Lieutenant Colonel Drives: 2012 F25 X3 28i (N52) Join Date: Sep 2018 Location: Northern Nevada You might try the Idrive: Vehicle Info > Vehicle Status > scroll down to the warning triangle and click on that, see if the errors show and you can reset. The faults ‘may’ reset on their own as you continue to drive the car. Some faults are ‘hard’, some are ‘soft’. Soft fault codes will reset on their own – you might drive 100 or so miles and see, no harm done. If they don’t reset then you need a fault code scan tool – you can get a phone app like BimmerLink and companion wi-fi transmitter to plug into car’s OBDII port, east to connect and run the app to clear codes. Or, if you have a realtionship with an independant German car mechanic it’s not much work at all for them to connect their diagnostic tool/scanner and reset the faults – know the guy well?.he might do it as a courtesty; it only takes a few minutes. Last edited by Wgosma; 01-20-2020 at 04:29 PM,

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01-20-2020, 04:54 PM # Brigadier General Drives: 21 X5 40i, 18 GTi, Snowblower Join Date: Nov 2014 Location: NY Quote:

Originally Posted by Wgosma You might try the Idrive: Vehicle Info > Vehicle Status > scroll down to the warning triangle and click on that, see if the errors show and you can reset. The faults ‘may’ reset on their own as you continue to drive the car. Some faults are ‘hard’, some are ‘soft’. Soft fault codes will reset on their own – you might drive 100 or so miles and see, no harm done. If they don’t reset then you need a fault code scan tool – you can get a phone app like BimmerLink and companion wi-fi transmitter to plug into car’s OBDII port, east to connect and run the app to clear codes. Or, if you have a realtionship with an independant German car mechanic it’s not much work at all for them to connect their diagnostic tool/scanner and reset the faults – know the guy well?.he might do it as a courtesty; it only takes a few minutes.

Thanks Wgosma, I tried to find a way via iDrive but none existed. So far I’ve driven around 40 miles since the new wheel speed sensor was installed. Thing is, if simply driving it doesn’t work, I won’t know if there are additional reasons for the continuation of the idiot lights or if they are the hard reset type. I know my brakes work well but don’t know if the ABS feature works and really don’t want to slam on the brakes to test it as I just installed new rotors and pads. I’m from NY but visiting my family in Florida so I don’t have any relationships with anyone here 🙁 I just started looking at OBD tools, there are a plethora of them and if I buy one I would like to get one that checks and resets any airbag errors as well as can code features in today’s cars. In the meantime, it shouldn’t take long to accumulate more miles on the car to see if they go away on their own. OSHA put a stop to auto parts stores resetting errors, they can only check for them.

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01-20-2020, 10:30 PM # Colonel Drives: ’15 650i Convertible Join Date: Apr 2018 Location: US A regular OBDII scanner won’t reset your ABS light or the traction control warning. And if they reset on their own, that is typically a function of numerous starts engine start cycles as opposed to miles. Give a few.

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01-20-2020, 10:33 PM # Brigadier General Drives: 21 X5 40i, 18 GTi, Snowblower Join Date: Nov 2014 Location: NY Quote:

Originally Posted by Opie55 A regular OBDII scanner won’t reset your ABS light or the traction control warning. And if they reset on their own, that is typically a function of numerous starts engine start cycles as opposed to miles. Give a few.

Yeah, I see that. Looks like most OBDII scanners don’t touch airbag issues and you have to buy a separate airbag reset device. Ugh. Still looking though. I’m up to around 60 miles now since I replaced the wheel speed sensor, still have a christmas tree dash.

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03-25-2020, 08:00 PM # Private Drives: BMW e36ic, 2013 x3 Join Date: Oct 2019 Location: Braintree Ma coding I just picked up a foxwell nt530 for under 200 usd that will reset all those codes including srs and air bag faults. I have a 2013 x3 and a classic 99 e36 convertible and it works great on both. It comes with lifetime updates. I am very happy with it and how well it works. best of all it paid for it self the first time I used it. The light issue won’t go away on its own you will need to clear those codes with a tool. In Ma were I am you can’t get an inspection sticker with error lights on. I had disconnected the air bag on the pass side in the convertible because I bring my dog with me everywhere. I bought the Foxwell to reset tha srs light for my sticker. good luck

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03-25-2020, 08:47 PM # Brigadier General Drives: 21 X5 40i, 18 GTi, Snowblower Join Date: Nov 2014 Location: NY Quote:

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Originally Posted by littleob I just picked up a foxwell nt530 for under 200 usd that will reset all those codes including srs and air bag faults. I have a 2013 x3 and a classic 99 e36 convertible and it works great on both. It comes with lifetime updates. I am very happy with it and how well it works. best of all it paid for it self the first time I used it. The light issue won’t go away on its own you will need to clear those codes with a tool. In Ma were I am you can’t get an inspection sticker with error lights on. I had disconnected the air bag on the pass side in the convertible because I bring my dog with me everywhere. I bought the Foxwell to reset tha srs light for my sticker. good luck

My bad for not updating my issue. I replaced both of the ABS wheel speed sensors that Bimmerlink told me were bad. I used Bimmerlink in combo with the Veepeak OBD BLE+ reader and was able to reset all lights. I suspect because I did not have a real airbag issue, it went away when I did the reset. I’ve now put about 1,500 miles on the car since I replaced the ABS wheel speed sensors and did the reset and all is well – back to normal

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03-15-2021, 10:48 PM # Registered Drives: BMW x3 (2006) Join Date: Jun 2019 Location: San Francisco BMW (x3) and Foxwell NT 530 I got a cheap “FixD” scanner for Xmas 2019. didn’t do much, but enough for me to buy a Foxwell NT530 to help me manage to constant(!!) maitenance/repair of my 2006 BMWx3. When first bought, could easily fix whatever problem – and use the Foxwell to clear the codes off my dashboard. now (a rare 3-4 months in-between a fix), I can’t remember how to do this – and the manual is not helping. Anyone out there able to help. Did fix the (spark plug) problem, car is humming along better than in a loooooong while. but can’t get the “check engine light” to go off. (the Foxwell scanner is clean – states zero problems). Thanks all (*I’m always amazed at how nice strangers are to one another on this site – you guys rock!!!)

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03-31-2021, 02:19 AM # Registered Drives: BMW BMW x3 Join Date: Feb 2019 Location: NorCal Quote:

Originally Posted by littleob I just picked up a foxwell nt530 for under 200 usd that will reset all those codes including srs and air bag faults. I have a 2013 x3 and a classic 99 e36 convertible and it works great on both. It comes with lifetime updates. I am very happy with it and how well it works. best of all it paid for it self the first time I used it. The light issue won’t go away on its own you will need to clear those codes with a tool. In Ma were I am you can’t get an inspection sticker with error lights on. I had disconnected the air bag on the pass side in the convertible because I bring my dog with me everywhere. I bought the Foxwell to reset tha srs light for my sticker. good luck

Dumb Question about your Foxwell NT530: I also bought this scanner. and I can’t figure-out how to eliminate the ‘check engine light’ on my dashboard. A friend just replaced my s.plugs (6) + coils (6). and when I scan w/ the NT530, now no codes. but why can’t I get the darn C.E.L. light to go off on the car itself? ughhh. I can’t find this ‘drill’ in the manual, Foxwell helpdesk is slow – not helpful. Also can’t find an answer on YouTube. Can you please share any HOW’s? Or points to videos, other sources. Thanks!

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04-02-2021, 10:52 AM # Private Drives: BMW e36ic, 2013 x3 Join Date: Oct 2019 Location: Braintree Ma you got me. I have never had that issue. I just go to clear codes and hit the button. I am sorry I can’t be of more help. If you find an answer please post it here for the rest of folks that have one. Good luck

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09-30-2022, 09:14 AM # Registered Drives: BMW X5 Join Date: Sep 2022 Location: Braintree, MA Quote:

Originally Posted by littleob I just picked up a foxwell nt530 for under 200 usd that will reset all those codes including srs and air bag faults. I have a 2013 x3 and a classic 99 e36 convertible and it works great on both. It comes with lifetime updates. I am very happy with it and how well it works. best of all it paid for it self the first time I used it. The light issue won’t go away on its own you will need to clear those codes with a tool. In Ma were I am you can’t get an inspection sticker with error lights on. I had disconnected the air bag on the pass side in the convertible because I bring my dog with me everywhere. I bought the Foxwell to reset tha srs light for my sticker. good luck

You did not have any issues passing inspection after resetting the srs light? I had the SRS light pop up on my X5, and my mechanic was able to clear it – he mentioned it had something to do with driver’s resistance. However it still failed inspection. They said that they could see that the code had been cleared. Curious where you got your car inspected since we’re from the same town! Or do you know if I need to drive it around for x amount of miles?

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09-30-2022, 05:32 PM # Second Lieutenant Drives: 2012 X3 35iX Join Date: Dec 2018 Location: Denver, CO In an emissions check, they’re really only looking for the readiness codes. Here’s a basic article on it It’s this that they determined had been reset too recently. Were you clearing an airbag code? Did you clear it by clearing ALL faults? Retest it but only clear the specific fault. _ 1986 Delphin 528e – Has led a hard life, 290k and still kicking.1998 Avus Blau 328iC – My topless summer girl.2008 Platinum-Beige X3 3.0si – Current project 2012 Alpine White X3 xDrive35i – My snowmobile.

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09-30-2022, 09:09 PM # Private Drives: BMW e36ic, 2013 x3 Join Date: Oct 2019 Location: Braintree Ma Quote:

Originally Posted by ken_ccc You did not have any issues passing inspection after resetting the srs light? I had the SRS light pop up on my X5, and my mechanic was able to clear it – he mentioned it had something to do with driver’s resistance. However it still failed inspection. They said that they could see that the code had been cleared. Curious where you got your car inspected since we’re from the same town! Or do you know if I need to drive it around for x amount of miles?

I go to South Shore BMW in Rockland. All I can say is on my convertible I disconnect the passenger side air bag as my Golden Retrever rides in the front seat. Last sticker I reset it in the back of the dealership drove around and into the inspection bay. I was out the door in 20 min with a sticker. On my x3, I just removed the sheep skin seat Covers to have them cleaned. when you remove the head rests you trip a SRS code having to disengage the active headrest. I will reset tomorrow as I will be getting a sticker @ SSBMW. I never have an issue there.

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10-04-2022, 01:26 PM # Private Drives: BMW e36ic, 2013 x3 Join Date: Oct 2019 Location: Braintree Ma Hey Ken I wanted to get back to you about the sticker. I just reset the codes and drove to Holbrook to get a sticker. I wanted to see about your questions. There is a drive cycle that must be performed after resetting the abs. I checked with my friend @ SSBMW about why my convertible didn’t he thinks it was because of the year as it is a 99 and there really was nothing wrong. I just pulled the plug on pas air bag but he really didn’t have a good answer his words. Sorry for the misinformation Jack

How to reset certain error lights
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How do you clear BMW permanent codes?

What are Permanent Diagnostic Trouble Codes? – Permanent Diagnostic Trouble Codes (PDTCs) are very similar to regular Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). However, unlike regular DTCs, they cannot be reset by disconnecting the vehicle’s battery or cleared using an On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) scan tool.
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How long does it take for a BMW computer to reset?

How do you reset a BMW ECU? | Jerry My car won’t start. I was doing some research online, and it seems like the ECU is probably the issue. How do you reset a BMW computer to factory settings? Impressive sleuthing skills! You can reset a ECU by unplugging the negative battery cable for 10 to 15 minutes.

  1. This should be enough to reset the ECU in most BMW models.
  2. If this doesn’t work, you can also try to reset it.
  3. This will also help if the issue is a drained battery! If you still have problems getting your car to start after jumping the battery, however, you’ll need to talk to a mechanic to learn more about what’s going on.

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Can permanent DTC codes be erased?

A Permanent Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) is stored when a DTC is confirmed and the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) has been illuminated. A Permanent DTC can only then be cleared by the module strategy and cannot be erased by clearing DTCs with a scan tool, a Keep-Alive Memory (KAM) reset, or battery disconnect.
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Will disconnecting battery clear permanent codes?

Did you know that modern vehicles are really high-tech and automotive technology has changed over the years? That statement usually makes technicians roll their eyeballs. No one knows better than technicians do just how advanced vehicles have become. And really, it’s not as if the people who spend their days working with vehicles haven’t figured this out yet.

The constant quest for better fuel economy and lower emissions has made engineers come up with incredible ways to make simple things very complicated, and technicians are sometimes left to clean up the aftermath of the engineers’ decisions, often by being as clever and skillful as the engineers themselves.

On that note, there’s another change coming down the pipes that technicians need to be aware of — Permanent DTCs. Starting with certain 2009 vehicles, and mandatory for all 2010 model year vehicles (and there’s already some of these on Canadian roads), this new type of DTC is being phased in to meet new American emission legislation.

Permanent DTCs are designed to stop dishonest folks from cheating on emission tests by just clearing the codes when the vehicle has an emission-related fault, without fixing the problem and allowing the vehicle to leave the shop without a proper fix. So the idea behind the technology is indeed noble.

But there’s one hitch. Permanent DTCs aren’t cleared in the usual way, with a scan tool or in some cases by disconnecting the battery. They have a unique way to clear them, and they’re already giving technicians a few headaches. Permanent DTCs can only be cleared by proving to the computer that the problem has been fixed and the condition is not returning.

And since emission programs and legislation are already causing more than enough headaches for Canadian shop owners and technicians, it’s important to understand how these new DTCs work to prevent problems and misdiagnosis. Here’s a quick look at DTCs in 2009 and beyond: Current DTCs This type of DTC isn’t new, and these are still almost always the best kinds to deal with.

What is new is quite often these used to be made up of a letter, followed by four numbers. Now the first digit is still a letter, but quite often letters are mixed-in with the four numbers that follow that prefix. Whichever way the DTC is constructed, the DTC will set when a problem is happening — making it much easier to diagnose and repair the cause of the recorded problem.

  1. Oneand two-trip (or more) detection logic still applies, meaning the code may not set the first time the fault happens.
  2. But the bottom line about current DTCs is the computer received an input that wasn’t within what its programming says is normal, and it’s made a note of it to help fix the problem — and whatever the problem was, it’s still happening right then.

These can still be cleared in the usual way, but they’ll likely return quickly if the problem is not fixed. History DTCs These are readings that were out of parameter before, but aren’t out of range now. After a certain number of “clean” trips — trips when a fault doesn’t reoccur — a “current” DTC will become a “history” DTC.

  1. These can still be cleared in the usual way, after the data is recorded and you’re sure you won’t need it.
  2. The important thing here is not to erase information that could speed up diagnosis.
  3. Pending DTCs These are DTCs that were out of parameter once, but need to be out of parameter again before the MIL light comes on.

Sometimes the problem was just a glitch, sometimes it’s something more serious. The important thing to understand is the cause of the pending DTC needs to be investigated further. Permanent DTCs These are the new, emission-related DTCs that can’t be cleared from the ECM or TCM until the computer knows for sure that the problem was fixed.

This usually involves performing a Universal Trip Drive Pattern exactly as described, but there are other ways, such as performing a dedicated monitor cycle. Permanent DTCs first appeared on certain 2009 vehicles, and are being legislated on 2010 vehicles. As with any new technology, the “glitches” may need to be worked out in the field, so reading the repair manual and TSBs are important steps before beginning diagnosis.

Universal Trip Drive Pattern So, how to clear a Permanent DTC? By performing a Universal Trip Drive Pattern that meets the strict criteria in the repair manual, to prove to the computer that the fault has indeed been repaired and no one is trying to cheat on an emissions test.

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After performing this Drive Pattern, if the code doesn’t clear it’s usually because the strict criteria were not followed exactly. It’s a pain, but that’s the way it goes. Typically, this Universal Trip Drive Pattern starts off by clearing all the DTCs so that only the Permanent DTC remains (always refer to service information for applicable information and procedures).

Then turn the ignition ON, start the vehicle and let it idle for at least 30 seconds. Then, without cycling the key, drive the vehicle for at least five minutes at more than 40 km/h. Then (again without cycling the key) let the vehicle idle for at least 30 seconds before shutting it OFF.

  • The whole drive cycle must take at least 10 minutes.
  • After performing a Universal Trip Drive Pattern, the computer clears the code, since it’s “seen” that the problem is fixed and not reoccurring.
  • Sounds simple enough, and most problems have apparently come from not performing the Universal Trip Drive Pattern correctly, but time will tell if these new DTCs will be problematic.

Dedicated monitor cycle If you’d rather not perform a Universal Trip Drive Pattern, performing three dedicated monitor cycles will also clear a permanent DTC. This way takes more time and some research, but it works and it’s always good to know more than one way to get things done.

To clear the Permanent DTC using a dedicated monitor cycle, start by repairing the fault that caused the DTC in the first place. Then clear all the codes except for the permanent DTC (if it were that easy, there’d be no problems), and make sure the Permanent DTC is the only one left. Then look up the details for that specific monitor drive cycle in the repair manual, and road test the vehicle under those conditions — three separate times.

You’ll need to complete three of these cycles (from cold start if applicable) to successfully clear the code. After the monitor runs three times with no problems the code will clear and you’ll be happy (confirm this, though). Changing technology is nothing new, and Permanent DTC legislation is nothing you can’t handle.

  1. A diagnostic trouble code is still, in its simplest form, a sign that an input to the computer wasn’t within the range of what the computer’s been told is acceptable.
  2. The basics are still the same, even if the repair strategy changed a bit.
  3. Understanding what’s going on, performing the monitor drive cycle exactly as the repair manual directs, and remembering that the driving force behind this change is a fairer testing process (and ultimately lower pollution levels) will hopefully make this new technology easier to deal with.

Because we all know that even more changes will be arriving shortly. SSGM
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Can clearing codes fix the problem?

Why Clearing is Important – Because each dashboard light is an indicator that something is malfunctioning, it’s essential that techs don’t clear codes without making repairs. They should make a note of the error and then make the necessary fixes to clear the code.

  • When a code clears, you know that the vehicle has been restored to good working order.
  • However, there could be occasions when clearing the codes manually is part of the repair process.
  • For example, a check engine light can be triggered when the gas cap isn’t tightened correctly.
  • However, tightening the cap down correctly doesn’t always fix the issue, and it can often take 10-20 cycles before the computer registers that the problem has been fixed.

Here is an instance where you can clear the code so that the computer can continue to read other malfunctions and errors correctly without having to relearn driving behaviors.
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Can I reset check engine light myself?

3. Turning the Ignition On and Off – If you’ve ever worked in an office setting with an IT department, you may have asked for help with an issue plaguing your computer. ‘Did you try rebooting your machine?’ is likely the first question your IT wizard asked.

The on-off method is the equivalent fix for a vehicle’s check engine light. It forces the computer to refresh its saved state through a reboot. Simply place your key into the ignition and turn it on for 1-2 seconds, then turn it off for 1-2 seconds. Repeat this step three or four times. If the check engine light remains after the reset, you might still have a problem with your vehicle.

Consider checking for the error code with the OBD2 scanner or taking your car to a professional mechanic.
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Do engine codes clear themselves?

A check engine light will shut itself off if the condition that caused it is remedied. So, if your converter is marginal, and you did a lot of stop-and-go driving, which creates high demand for the converter, that may have turned on the check engine light.
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How many miles does it take to clear a code?

Chances are that you’ve had your check engine light issue fixed BUT the light is still on! And it’s getting on your nerves. Maybe it cost you a fortune. So why is the light still on? Here’s something you probably don’t know: after clearing the car’s computer you will need to drive for about 50 to 100 miles.

System Status Explanation
READY The Check Engine Light didn’t come on. The system is working properly. Hooray!
NOT READY Your car hasn’t been driven long enough after resetting the codes. Solution: Keep driving until the system indicates a READY condition.
NOT APPLICABLE Your car doesn’t support that status monitor. Simply ignore it.

But hang on a minute, there are other important things to keep in mind. So let’s take a closer look.
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Can I reset check engine light myself?

3. Turning the Ignition On and Off – If you’ve ever worked in an office setting with an IT department, you may have asked for help with an issue plaguing your computer. ‘Did you try rebooting your machine?’ is likely the first question your IT wizard asked.

The on-off method is the equivalent fix for a vehicle’s check engine light. It forces the computer to refresh its saved state through a reboot. Simply place your key into the ignition and turn it on for 1-2 seconds, then turn it off for 1-2 seconds. Repeat this step three or four times. If the check engine light remains after the reset, you might still have a problem with your vehicle.

Consider checking for the error code with the OBD2 scanner or taking your car to a professional mechanic.
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Does disconnecting battery clear codes?

I want to change my spark plugs (and save myself about $50 in labor), but don’t want to lose any obd2 error codes my mechanic may need. I am planning on having my mechanic do a full inspection on the vehicle later this week. Will removing the negative terminal from the battery erase or delete the codes, and make it more difficult and costly for the diagnosis of any additional repairs currently needed on my vehicle? Thank you. Disconnecting the battery will not clear any codes in memory of the computer for stored OBD2 codes. The only way to clear the codes is to use a scanner and use the code clear function. The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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