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What Color Coolant Does Mercedes Use?

What Color Coolant Does Mercedes Use
Mercedes Benz Engine Coolant / Antifreeze (1-Gallon) ( BLUE Color ) 100% Undiluted.
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What type of coolant does Mercedes use?

What Are Antifreeze & Coolant? – Every diesel and gasoline-powered engine contains a constant series of small explosions while running. The fuel igniting in the cylinders creates the power that drives the car and sends us on our way, but as you might imagine, those explosions make things hot.

Those explosions can weaken and warp the metal around it if left long enough, effectively destroying the engine components. Coolant and cooling systems prevent that, so your engine can last as long as it’s taken care of. Circulating through the radiator of your Mercedes-Benz or Mercedes-AMG is a mixture of distilled water and antifreeze.

The terms coolant and antifreeze aren’t as interchangeable as some believe, but their use in a given situation will usually get the point across. In official Mercedes terms, coolant is the blend of antifreeze and water needed to keep engines at their optimal operating temperature in all weather conditions. Low engine coolant or a leaky system can be detrimental to your engine’s health, especially turbocharged engines. Turbochargers, and other forms of forced induction, create far more heat than a normally aspirated one, making a case for a properly-functioning cooling system that much more important.
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Does Mercedes-Benz need special coolant?

Mercedes-Benz Coolant – Coolant, as it relates to vehicles, is constantly a liquid or gas substance used to regulate the temperature of your engine. Liquid coolants are usually half water and half ethylene glycol. Water is used to transfer heat while ethylene glycol is used to lower the chilly point of the liquid.

In colder climates, this is highly difficult. Interestingly enough, this isn’t the first time you’ve heard of ethylene glycol as it is the primary ingredient in the prominent term “antifreeze”. Keep in mind, you never want to pour antifreeze or water by themselves into your engine system. They need to be combined to create the normal coolant.

You can purchase ready-made mixtures of coolant that already have water added, or you can purchase full-strength antifreeze which needs to be diluted with distilled water before being added to the engine system. Give the experts at Mercedes-Benz of Fort Pierce a call at 7725772694 or schedule service online and let one of our mechanics and service advisors handle your coolant flush.

Every car manufacturer, including Mercedes-Benz has developed its own coolant or requires a discernible coolant that is unique to explicit years and models. There are many colors of coolants to aid distinguish each including yellow, red, purple blue, green, and orange. It is hard to do your research if you plan to pay cash for, flush, or replace the coolant in your vehicle.

Several models will not be compatible even with “universal” coolants or antifreeze. Mercedes-Benz of Fort Pierce offers a variety of coolant flush coupons to help you save now. To shop all of our service specials click here. If you’d like to handle your coolant service yourself, you can still purchase coolant or antifreeze from Mercedes-Benz of Fort Pierce directly at a critical price.
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Does it matter what color coolant I use?

Going Colorblind – hauged // Getty Images In addition to the OE options, auto parts stores will carry several different aftermarket brands of coolant. Companies like Prestone, Pentafrost, Peak, and others all offer versions that they say work for specific brands or countries in general (the country a car is made in is typically a good predictor for which coolant type it takes).

  1. These aftermarket options are cheaper than OE a lot of the time, but it’s worth grabbing true OE coolant designed for your car.
  2. But what about different colored coolants? The truth is, color is not a reliable predictor for what type of coolant you have.
  3. For example, OAT coolants are usually orange, yellow, red or purple.

HOAT coolants are orange and yellow for the most part. Then the older IAT coolant is green. Coolants that manufacturers sell can confuse matters even more, like Honda’s blue coolant. That’s why you need to read what the bottle says and and not rely specific color you’re pouring.

  • If the the bottle’s description has you tripped up, check your owner’s manual for the right kind of coolant.
  • But none of this helps if you forget the process in a few years time.
  • So keep notes on the coolant you used and when, so you’re prepared when your engine inevitably needs flushing a few years down the road.

Zac Palmer has been a car geek since he knew what a car was, and he doesn’t plan on switching hobbies any time soon. : Car Coolant — How To Choose the Right Car Coolant
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Can Mercedes mix green and blue coolant?

As this will wreck your engine, I would advise never to mix coolants based on colour alone. Only mix coolants of the same type.
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What happens if you use the wrong color antifreeze?

What happens if the wrong coolant or mixture is used? – Mixing different engine coolants or using the wrong coolant can impair the performance of the special additive packages; this can result in increased corrosion to the radiator. The protective layers in the cooling system gradually become thinner and more porous and the engine coolant needs to be changed at more frequent intervals.
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Can I add coolant to my Mercedes?

Adding coolant is easy, too. As long as you’ve given the radiator plenty of time to cool, you simply remove the cap and pour fresh coolant into the reservoir.
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Is Prestone coolant OK for Mercedes?

Is it suitable for classic cars/ cars made before 2001? –

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Yes. Prestone is an OAT coolant/antifreeze but also contains anti-corrosion ingredients to protect your cooling system. It can be used in all cars effectively, offering the same levels of protection, and without any damage. We offer a guarantee that Prestone is suitable for all cars and engine materials. It’s also suitable for all light duty passenger vehicles.

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    How often should you change Mercedes coolant?

    In general, your Mercedes-Benz needs a coolant fluid exchange every 30,000 miles or every two years, whichever comes first. In some instances, you may be able to go longer without a coolant fluid exchange.
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    How much does Mercedes charge for a coolant?

    Most Popular Mercedes Coolant The average cost of a Mercedes coolant is between $19.99 and $29.99.
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    Can I use different brand coolant but same color?

    Can you mix coolant brands? My husband accidentally bought the wrong brand of coolant we’ve been using. Can I mix coolant brands in my car? Thankfully, the short answer is, yes, you can mix two brands of coolant, They just have to be the same type of coolant.

      Inorganic Acid Technology (IAT) : Contain phosphates and silicates, good for older cars, most commonly found in green. Organic Acid Technology (OAT) : Contain azoles and neutralized organic acids, good for newer cars, comes in all colors. Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT) : A mix of the two above, lasts up to 5 years, comes in all colors.

    As long as you aren’t mixing coolant technology, you should be good to mix brands. If you want to continue to treat your car right, why not get some ? You can save $800+ per year on insurance with, the top-rated insurance comparison app across all platforms.
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    Which colour coolant is best?

    The most common variety of liquid antifreeze is an IAT formula, or Inorganic Additive Technology. ZEREX™ Original Green is an IAT coolant that has been used for decades and is a formula proven to provide unsurpassed corrosion protection.
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    Can I drive with mixed coolant?

    What Happens If You Mix Different Types of Antifreeze? – Mixing antifreeze is a bad idea that can cause serious damage to the engine and your car in general. But, it is the type of antifreeze you mix that determines the outcome or impact on your vehicle since they all have different chemical compositions. So, if their chemical composition is the same, but the brands are different, you can safely use one for another in most all cases.
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    What color is universal coolant?

    For nearly a decade, vehicle manufacturers have been introducing and using a variety of extended-life coolants. The only thing these coolants have in common is that they all seem to differ in formulation and color. There are orange coolants, green coolants, blue coolants, red coolants, yellow coolants, even pink ones.

    • The proliferation of different coolant types has created a great deal of “chemical confusion” with motorists and technicians about what type of antifreeze should be used to top off or refill late-model cooling systems.
    • We’re not going to summarize the whole laundry list of OEM coolants and colors here except to say that each vehicle manufacturer has their own unique coolant specifications based on corrosion protection requirements, service life and chemical compatibility.

    These requirements are usually spelled out in the vehicle’s owner’s manual, and/or a decal or label on the coolant reservoir. It’s important to always use the coolant chemistry recommended in the vehicle owner’s manual. For example, Ford and Chrysler specify hybrid OAT-only coolants.

    You can’t go by the color of the dye in the coolant because two coolants with similar colors may have different chemistry, and two coolants with different colors may have similar chemistry. What’s more, colors can change if somebody tops off the system with a different coolant. The more we get into the specifics of each type of coolant, the more confusing the whole discussion becomes – so we’re only going to tell you what’s really worth knowing with respect to the different types of antifreeze.

    There are essentially three basic types of coolants:

      Traditional North American “green” antifreeze, the original “universal” formula that everybody used until the introduction of today’s extended-life coolants. The fast-acting silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors provide quick protection for bare iron and aluminum surfaces, and have a proven track record of providing trouble-free service in virtually any vehicle application (domestic, Asian or European), assuming the chemistry is correct. For example, OAT coolants should not be used in a vehicle that specifies the use of a hybrid OAT coolant. Again, always defer to the owner’s manual. But the short-lived nature of the corrosion inhibitors means this type of coolant should be changed every two to three years or 30,000 miles (though some products now claim a service interval of up to 50,000 miles with improved chemistry).

    OAT-based extended-life coolants. OAT stands for Organic Acid Technology, and includes such ingredients as sebacate, 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA) and other organic acids, but no silicates or phosphates (except in the case of Toyota’s pink extended-life coolant, which adds a dose of phosphate to its extended-life OAT-based antifreeze).

    OAT-based coolants are usually, but not always, dyed a different color to distinguish them from traditional North American green antifreeze. GM’s OAT-based Dex-Cool is orange. Volkswagen/Audi uses a similar product that’s dyed pink. But Honda has an extended-life OAT coolant that is dyed dark green and does not contain 2-EHA.

    The corrosion inhibitors in OAT coolants are slower acting, but much longer-lived than those in traditional North American green coolants. Consequently, OAT coolants typically have a recommended service life of five years or 150,000 miles. OAT corrosion inhibitors provide excellent long-term protection for aluminum and cast iron, but may not be the best choice for older cooling systems that have copper/brass radiators and heater cores.

    It depends on the formula. Hybrid OAT coolants, also known as “G-05.” This formulation also uses organic acids, but not 2-EHA (different organic acids are used). Hybrid OAT coolants add some silicate to provide quick-acting protection for aluminum surfaces. Silicate also helps repair surface erosion caused by cavitation in the water pump.

    Hybrid OAT coolants are currently used by many European vehicle manufacturers as well as Ford and Chrysler. Still Confused? OK, so there are a bunch of different coolants in today’s vehicles. The question is, which type of coolant should you recommend to top off or refill a customer’s vehicle? The “safe” answer is the type specified by the vehicle manufacturer.

    1. But practically speaking, shops don’t have the shelf space to stock different coolants for each different make of vehicle.
    2. One thing the aftermarket has always been good at is consolidation, and today’s coolants leave plenty of room for that.
    3. Recently, many antifreeze suppliers have introduced “universal” or “global” one-size-fits-all coolants that are claimed to be compatible with any new vehicle cooling system as well as older vehicles.

    The basic idea behind universal coolants is to eliminate all the confusion about colors and chemistry and have one basic product that works in any vehicle regardless of year, make or model. What could be simpler? Not all antifreeze suppliers buy into this marketing philosophy, so you’ll still see the three basic types of coolant being marketed: traditional green for older vehicles and budget-conscious motorists who want the least expensive product on the shelf, an extended-life product that is compatible with Dex-Cool and other OAT-based coolants, and a hybrid OAT for late-model Ford, Chrysler and European vehicles that specify G-05 coolant.

    But for those who offer a universal “all makes and all models” kind of product, the advantages are obvious: one or two SKUs to provide full coverage (full-strength antifreeze or 50/50 mix), less shelf space needed to stock the product, and most importantly, no confusion over which product to use in which application.

    Makers of universal coolants say their products are formulated to be compatible with all cooling systems (foreign or domestic) and all coolant types (traditional green, OAT and OAT-hybrid with silicate). The new universal coolants use unique OAT-based corrosion packages with proprietary organic acids (such as carboxylate) to provide broad spectrum protection.

    • When a universal coolant is used to top off a cooling system that already contains an extended-life OAT or hybrid coolant, the service life is unaffected.
    • It remains five years or 150,000 miles.
    • If a universal coolant is added to an older vehicle that has traditional green antifreeze in the cooling system, the service interval is also the same as before: two to three years or 30,000 to 50,000 miles.

    If a cooling system is being refilled with a universal coolant, the cooling system should be flushed to remove all traces of the old coolant. This is necessary to remove contaminants and to maximize the service life of the new coolant. If only the radiator is drained, up to a third of the old coolant can remain in the block.

    • If the old coolant is traditional green coolant, the new universal coolant will be diluted and won’t be able to extend protection much beyond that of the original coolant.
    • One very important point to keep in mind here is that universal coolants and extended-life coolants are not lifetime coolants.
    • The corrosion inhibitors in all types of coolant eventually wear out and must be replenished by changing the coolant.

    Leave the old coolant in too long and the cooling system will experience corrosion problems.
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    What happens if you put green coolant instead of blue?

    Coolant (Ethylene Glycol) is usually green, yellow, red, purple, orange or blue. These colors are not indicative of the formula used. Most coolants can be mixed without fear. They are made up of almost the same things.
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    How do you mix Mercedes coolant?

    Regular coolant is mixed at a ratio of 50:50.
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    What happens when you mix oat and Hoat coolant?

    Hybrid organic acid technology (HOAT) is not compatible with OAT or NOAT coolants. Also, if a system was running a NOAT and someone added OAT, the nitrite level would be diluted and possibly compromise cavitation protection, explained Mike Tourville, marketing director for Evans Cooling.
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    Can you mix 2 different colors of coolant?

    Some people believe that they can mix the two. This is a mistake and can lead to expensive repairs. The two coolants should never be mixed together as they do not react well. When mixed together they can form a thick, jelly-like substance that can completely stop all coolant flow which can lead to overheating.
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    Can you mix any color coolant?

    Never mix different types of coolant – Unless you’re an expert on the exact chemical composition and reactions of the various types, keep it simple and stick with what the manufacturer recommends. Mixing the wrong types could cause radiator and cooling system damage (which could lead to engine/waterpump damage) and a repair bill that’ll make you pass out on the floor.
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    Do Mercedes and BMW use the same coolant?

    What Coolant is Right for My German Automobile? Whether you drive a BMW, Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Audi, Mini or Volkswagen, your vehicle circulates a mixture of water and coolant to dissipate the heat generated within your engine—preventing it from having a total melt down (one notable exception are older models that are air and oil cooled and did not use water or coolant, but instead circulated a large amount of oil to dissipate the heat).

    A Rainbow of Colors : There are a lot of coolant types to choose from—so which is right for your BMW, Porsche,, Audi or Volkswagen? The answer is the type that came in your vehicle originally. Although depending on the manufacturer, your coolant may be green, pink, blue, yellow or even clear. All coolants are naturally clear and the color is created with dye.

    Each manufacturer puts their own dye mixture into their coolant—it does not affect the chemical characteristics of the coolant. European manufacturers prefer coolant that is phosphate-free because the water in Europe is much harder than the water here in the United States.

    There are three basic coolant types on the market today: (IAT) Inorganic Acid Technology, (OAT) Organic Acid Technology and (HOAT) Hybrid Organic Acid Technology. Your BMW, Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Audi or Volkswagen uses an HOAT coolant. HOAT coolants are derived from OAT coolants with the addition of silicate to protect aluminum surfaces.

    Many components of your BMW, Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Audi and Volkswagen engine and cooling systems are made of aluminum including the cylinder heads and radiators. OAT coolants do not use silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors. These coolants have an extended service life and are designed for 150,000 miles of service (or 5 years).

    • Although it should be noted that German Auto Center and most manufacturers recommend flushing or changing the coolant every two years.
    • Traditional coolants are IAT coolants and uses silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors to protect the metal (Iron) parts of the engine and cooling system.
    • As your BMW, Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Mini, Audi and Volkswagen have replaced most iron components with aluminum and other lighter composites, IAT coolants should not be used.

    Although you can mix coolant types without harm, it is highly recommended that you do not. Mixing an HOAT or OAT coolant with an IAT will lose the extended life properties. Please feel free to stop in and see the experts at German Auto Center if you have any questions.

    In addition, there are many online resources for auto diagnosis & auto repair help such as, Whether you drive a Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Mini BMW, Volkswagen or Audi, It is important to remember that with proper maintenance, today’s German performance vehicles will serve you for many miles and years to come.

    Visit at German Auto Center. We will be happy to assist you! : What Coolant is Right for My German Automobile?
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    Where can I top up my Mercedes coolant?

    How to top up your coolant – Find the red lever under the panel on the driver’s side of your car. Pull this down until you hear a ‘pop’. This will loosen the bonnet and allow you to open it safely. Locate a small black container which has the coolant logo embossed on it.

    If you are unsure what this logo looks like, refer to the warning message on your dash screen, or the owner’s manual. Wait until the engine and the container are completely cool, and then open the container cap. Fill the container with coolant. The white meter inside the container should let you know when you are at the top.

    It is important not to overfill, as this could be dangerous. Secure the cap, close the bonnet carefully, and get ready to drive away! This couldn’t be simpler. This guide could be found here:
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    Should I start car after adding coolant?

    Once the hood is open, there’s a risk of being sprayed with hot water or steam. ‘Your personal safety is most important,’ he says. ‘Waiting for at least 15 minutes allows the hood, engine and leaking coolant to cool.’
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    Is Prestone coolant OK for Mercedes?

    Is it suitable for classic cars/ cars made before 2001? –

Yes. Prestone is an OAT coolant/antifreeze but also contains anti-corrosion ingredients to protect your cooling system. It can be used in all cars effectively, offering the same levels of protection, and without any damage. We offer a guarantee that Prestone is suitable for all cars and engine materials. It’s also suitable for all light duty passenger vehicles.

    View full answer

    Do Mercedes and BMW use the same coolant?

    What Coolant is Right for My German Automobile? Whether you drive a BMW, Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Audi, Mini or Volkswagen, your vehicle circulates a mixture of water and coolant to dissipate the heat generated within your engine—preventing it from having a total melt down (one notable exception are older models that are air and oil cooled and did not use water or coolant, but instead circulated a large amount of oil to dissipate the heat).

    A Rainbow of Colors : There are a lot of coolant types to choose from—so which is right for your BMW, Porsche,, Audi or Volkswagen? The answer is the type that came in your vehicle originally. Although depending on the manufacturer, your coolant may be green, pink, blue, yellow or even clear. All coolants are naturally clear and the color is created with dye.

    Each manufacturer puts their own dye mixture into their coolant—it does not affect the chemical characteristics of the coolant. European manufacturers prefer coolant that is phosphate-free because the water in Europe is much harder than the water here in the United States.

    1. There are three basic coolant types on the market today: (IAT) Inorganic Acid Technology, (OAT) Organic Acid Technology and (HOAT) Hybrid Organic Acid Technology.
    2. Your BMW, Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Audi or Volkswagen uses an HOAT coolant.
    3. HOAT coolants are derived from OAT coolants with the addition of silicate to protect aluminum surfaces.

    Many components of your BMW, Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Audi and Volkswagen engine and cooling systems are made of aluminum including the cylinder heads and radiators. OAT coolants do not use silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors. These coolants have an extended service life and are designed for 150,000 miles of service (or 5 years).

    Although it should be noted that German Auto Center and most manufacturers recommend flushing or changing the coolant every two years. Traditional coolants are IAT coolants and uses silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors to protect the metal (Iron) parts of the engine and cooling system. As your BMW, Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Mini, Audi and Volkswagen have replaced most iron components with aluminum and other lighter composites, IAT coolants should not be used.

    Although you can mix coolant types without harm, it is highly recommended that you do not. Mixing an HOAT or OAT coolant with an IAT will lose the extended life properties. Please feel free to stop in and see the experts at German Auto Center if you have any questions.

    1. In addition, there are many online resources for auto diagnosis & auto repair help such as,
    2. Whether you drive a Porsche, Mercedes Benz, Mini BMW, Volkswagen or Audi, It is important to remember that with proper maintenance, today’s German performance vehicles will serve you for many miles and years to come.

    Visit at German Auto Center. We will be happy to assist you! : What Coolant is Right for My German Automobile?
    View full answer

    Can I put water instead of coolant in Mercedes?

    Avoid Constant Water Top Ups – It’s Okay to top up Mercedes coolant using just water, however, using coolant to top up is always best. The problem with using water is, it dilutes the coolant strength. I should point out when we say coolant we are also talking about the antifreeze, they are one and the same. You’ll find a link to Mercedes compatible coolants here on the consumables page, Coolant is a concoction of chemicals designed to perform four main tasks:

    To cool Offer freeze protection Lubricate Prevent engine corrosion

    To cool – Using plain water as coolant will challenge your Mercedes coolant system. Coolant is specially formulated to have a higher boiling point, and that’s a good thing. In the dead heat of summer or a five-mile traffic jam. Allowing a car to overheat risks blowing the head gasket or worse warping the cylinder head.

    Having the correct quantity and strength of coolant will make the difference between steam by the side of the highway or sitting pretty behind the wheel with the a/c on full. Antifreeze – The antifreeze additive offers frost protection down to -35F, constantly topping up with plain water reduces the effectiveness of the antifreeze, effectively increasing the chances of frost damage.

    Frost, as you know, causes water to freeze and expand, when the water inside an engine freezes it cracks the cylinder or block causing thousands of dollars in damage. Antifreeze is super important. Lubrication – Your Mercedes coolant system employs a pump to move coolant around the system, the pump shaft needs lubrication, rubber seals also need to be lubricated. Anti-corrosive protection – Corrosion isn’t just for the bodywork, without the correct quantity of anticorrosive additives in the coolant, the inside of the engine would begin to corrode. Head gaskets are usually the first to corrode. Corrosion is difficult to remove and causes issues like pump failure, and total engine failure in really severe cases.
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    How much does Mercedes charge for a coolant?

    Most Popular Mercedes Coolant The average cost of a Mercedes coolant is between $19.99 and $29.99.
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