Car base Jenama kereta When Did The Ford Raptor Come Out?

When Did The Ford Raptor Come Out?

When Did The Ford Raptor Come Out
First generation (SVT Raptor; 2010) –

First generation (P415)
2012 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor SuperCab in Australia
Overview
Manufacturer Ford SVT ( Ford )
Also called Ford Lobo SVT Raptor (Mexico)
Production 2009–2014
Model years 2010–2014
Assembly United States: Dearborn, Michigan ( Dearborn Truck Plant )
Body and chassis
Class Full-size pickup truck
Body style 2+2 door extended cab 4-door crew cab
Platform Ford T1 platform
Related Ford F-Series (twelfth generation)
Powertrain
Engine 5.4 L Modular 3-valve V8 6.2 L Boss V8
Transmission 6-speed 6R80 automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase SuperCab: 133.3 in (3,390 mm) SuperCrew: 145.2 in (3,690 mm)
Length SuperCab: 220.6 in (5,600 mm) SuperCrew: 232.1 in (5,900 mm)
Width 86.3 in (2,190 mm)
Height SuperCab: 78.5 in (1,990 mm) SuperCrew: 78.4 in (1,990 mm)
Curb weight SuperCab: 6,016 lb (2,729 kg) SuperCrew: 6,210 lb (2,820 kg)

For the 2010 model year, Ford SVT introduced the F-150 SVT Raptor, its second vehicle derived from the Ford F-150. In notable contrast to the on-road capability of the 1993-2004 SVT Lightning, the SVT Raptor was optimized for off-road performance, similar to a desert racing vehicle.

  1. Raptor” was initially the vehicle’s placeholder nickname during development, with Ford having to come to an arrangement with Mosler for the Raptor name rights.
  2. The first production Raptor, molten orange with the digital mud graphic, sold at auction for $130,000 with all proceeds above the MSRP going to charity.

The race version, the F-150 SVT Raptor R, was built for the Baja 1000 races. It uses a 6.2 L V8 engine rated at 500 hp (370 kW).
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How much is a 2010 Ford Raptor?

Ford F-150 Full Overview “I mean, this is amazing, right?” shouts SVT Vehicle Dynamics engineer, Ford Tier 3-certified test driver, and possible asylum candidate Gene Martindale over the din of 35-inch tires pulverizing desert gravel. Amazing? No, this is utterly ridiculous.

  1. It’s 106 degrees, and we’re streaking across the rock- and sand-strewn frying pan that is Borrego Springs, California, in August.
  2. It’s absolutely miserable out here, so hot and dry the scorpions have taken refuge under the sidewinders.
  3. Word is, Blackwater mercenaries train in this unforgiving desert because it makes Kandahar look like Club Med.

You’d never know it from inside our truck. The A/C is blowing ice cold, and Gene keeps his right foot flat as we literally glide over whoop after whoop (an off-road-racing term for the thousands of beige speed bumps scattered before us). Whoops vary in size and composition, from small ones made of storm-piled sand to taller berms packed down by dirtbike and buggy tires, but all can seriously cripple a vehicle if taken at speed.

  1. We’re doing 100 mph.
  2. At half this rate, any regular truck would explosively dismantle as fast, hard, and repeated hits induce massive and comprehensive suspension or tire failure.
  3. Our truck simply strides over them, with some turbulence for us in the cabin, but without any gut wrenching, bolt stripping, metal-on-metal indications of imminent disaster.

Well, except for Gene. He keeps hollering and looking over to gauge my reaction. Because of my helmet, he can’t see the big, goofy grin on my face, nor does he realize I’m not ignoring him. I’m quietly scanning the horizon for the next big hit. Apparently, he takes my stoicism as evidence that I’m not having fun, and since we’re already at Vmax, he decides to show me what a little full-throttle opposite lock can do.

  1. It’s when we launch off a huge whoop while yawed at 45 degrees, that I realize I should let Gene know how much I’m enjoying myself.
  2. While I’d like to die with a smile on my face, I’d rather it not be in this godforsaken place.
  3. I let off a whoop of my own, and his response is an immediate and gleeful, “I know, right? You just can’t do that in any other truck!” Which is precisely the point.

Back in 2006, when Ford ‘s Special Vehicles Team set out to create a performance variant of the next-generation F150, they considered creating another slammed and supercharged street truck like the 1999-2004 SVT Lighting. Then SVT chief engineer Jamal Hameedi studied what was hot and what was not at the annual SEMA aftermarket show.

  1. What he saw was a resurging trend among Southern California truck enthusiasts toward lifted full-size trucks and prerunners modeled after desert racers.
  2. So he issued a challenge to his SVT team: Build the baddest off-road truck ever offered by an OEM.
  3. They call it the 2010 F-150 SVT Raptor, and it’s an unquestionable success.

Just look at the numbers: Compared with a standard F-150, the Raptor’s track is 6.6 inches wider to accommodate the longer and stronger upper-and-lower control arms, tie-rods, and halfshafts unique to this vehicle. The Raptor uses special composite fenders flared out by eight inches (four on each side) to help cover this wider track and the specially designed, 35-inch BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A tires.

  1. In fact, the Raptor is so wide, it’s required to run the federally mandated marker lights normally seen on dually trucks.
  2. Clearance from the lowest skidplate to the ground is 10 inches, which is easily soaked up by 11.2 inches of front and 12.1 inches of rear suspension travel provided by the specially designed Fox Racing shocks.

These shocks use Fox Racing’s patented internal bypass technology and are an industry first for a production vehicle. At normal ride height, Raptor shocks are three times stiffer than those in a standard F-150, yet they’re supple and compliant. Near the bottom of travel, the Raptor shocks grow roughly seven times stiffer than the F-150’s, which prevents hard impacts and the destruction of components and body work.

While bodywork and suspension from the A-pillar forward are almost entirely unique, the engine and interior are only slightly tweaked. Underhood is Ford’s stalwart 5.4-liter V-8 that makes 310 horsepower at 5000 rpm and 365 pound-feet of torque at 3500 rpm and mates to a six-speed automatic transmission.

It’s enough to get the job done, but the real desert racers will want the all-new, high-feature 6.2-liter V-8 that comes out early next year. That engine will make an estimated 400 horsepower and 400 pound feet of torque. Inside, the Raptor is treated to upgrades that match its aggressive exterior and badge, including a leather-wrapped steering wheel with centering sightline, beefed-up leather seat bolsters, and a four-pack of prewired and fused auxiliary switches, perfect for controlling everything from KC lights to a winch.

  1. With its huge tires, flared fenders, enormous grille, and optional graphics package, the Raptor looks like the ultimate desert toy.
  2. But it’s more than just a toy; with a 1000-pound payload, 6000-pound towing capacity, and all the bells and whistles of the regular F-150-including the factory-installed integrated trailer brake controller and trailer sway control, the Raptor can serve as the toy hauler and everyday work truck as well.

SVT made sure the Raptor isn’t a penalty box on-road. In fact, despite (or perhaps because of) the massive tires, the overall ride is significantly better than that of our long-term 2009 F-150 Lariat. The key here is those shocks again; with all that travel and progressively firm ride, the Raptor always feels like it’s moving in a giant suspension sweet spot.

  1. When cornering, it doesn’t roll as much your average full-size street truck, and it imparts a feeling of confidence and stability, no doubt due to the extra wide track and the those massive 315/70R17 BFGs.
  2. Those tires deserve special mention as well.
  3. You’d think such enormous off-road tuned rubber tucked under a 5900-pound truck would make for an obnoxiously loud ride, but the exact opposite is true.

Surprisingly, the BFGs don’t howl or scream however hard you push them. They’re quiet (perhaps too quiet) all the way up to the limit, allowing you to hear the Raptor’s subtle but sonorous exhaust note. The only real disadvantage of street driving a Raptor is all the extra width.

  1. It drives big and makes positioning it around tight corners a bit tricky.
  2. At this point, it would be easy to poo-poo Ford’s effort as just another big, bad car company coopting the trends of a hard-core enthusiast scene.
  3. Surely Ford and SVT left experts like BFG and Fox Racing to develop the hard stuff, and then they just packaged it all up and marketed it as their own, right? No.

What makes the Raptor such a formidable off-road performer is not just the battle-tested hard parts, but the subtleties of the electronics, a realm the aftermarket is loath to enter. To mess with complicated systems like antilock brakes and high-speed electronic-locking differentials, you need the combination of resources, brainpower, and experience only an OEM like Ford and a skunkworks like SVT can provide.

  1. For example, the Raptor’s electronic locking rear differential (E-locker) engages at all speeds, in any mode from 2HI to 4LO, with a simple pull of the drive-selector knob.
  2. Clicking the Raptor into Off-Road mode initiates a unique, higher-performance throttle map and shift schedule for the six-speed transmission.

The result: more aggressive shifting with revs held longer and the flickability of a prerunner with the traction of a 4×4. Hill Descent Control, a Raptor exclusive, utilizes the ABS actuators and allows for slow-speed downhill crawling in forward and reverse, without ever touching the brake pedal.

The Raptor is not only aggressively equipped, it’s aggressively priced. Quick, back-of-napkin calculations put the cost of making your own Raptor at least $8000-$12,000 on top of the purchase price of a full-size truck, and that’s without most of the fancy electronics. At $38,995, the 2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor is only $2500 more than the F-150 FX4, yet an order of magnitude more capable.

When they become available early next year, 6.2-liter-equipped Raptors will retail for $41,995. With this level of capability at that price point, we’d have to agree with chief engineer Hameedi. He firmly believes the Raptor has no compromises and no competition.

2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor
Base price $38,995
Vehicle layout Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 2-door truck
Engine 5.4L/310-hp/365 lb-ft SOHC 24-valve V-8
Transmission 6-speed auto
Curb weight 5900 lb (mfr)
Wheelbase 133 in
Length x width x height 220.9 x 86.3 x 78.4 in
0-60 mph 8.0 sec (MT est)
EPA city/hwy fuel econ 14/18 mpg
CO2 emissions 1.25 lb/mile
On sale in U.S. Now

RAPTOR FACTS Looks good! More details?

The Raptor name owes its creation to a bean counter, a finance guy on the SVT team who thought it would make a good code name while they thought up another moniker. The names Terminator and Condor (the latter soar over the Anza Borrego desert test facility) were considered, but the Raptor name stuck – though not without difficulty. Boutique sports-car manufacturer Mosler owned the rights to the name but settled with Ford/SVT.

Other Raptors include the Toronto NBA team, a Yamaha ATV, the Air Force’s F-22 stealth fighter jet, and a roller coaster in Sandusky, Ohio – though Ford’s is the only one with 35-inch claws.

With the exception of the headlights, the Raptor is unique from the F-150 from the A-pillar forward. The vented hood, composite fenders with heat extractors, front fascia, and front bumper are all Raptor exclusives. That front bumper is Ford’s first use of high-strength hydroformed steel as an exterior panel.

Raptors are built right alongside all other F-150s at Ford’s Dearbon Truck Plant. Despite the significantly widened track and fenders and lengthened and strengthened suspension components, the Raptor retains nearly all the factory mounting points from the F-150. In fact the frame required no additional drilling, welding, or cutting of. Only the front shock towers needed top-mounted spacers to give the Fox shocks the necessary wider angle. Giving the Raptor its own look and feel while minimizing the number of special manufacturing steps helps keep the cost down. In fact, Raptors need to be pulled off the production line at only two stages: wheel alignment (because of the extra wide track) and for the installation of the numerous aluminum skidplates.

Optional steel sidesteps are vented and wider than normal to prevent rocks and debris kicked up by the widened track and tires from hitting the flared fenders.

The patented internal bypass shocks developed in conjunction with Fox Racing Shox help make the Raptor ready for anything – possibly even war. While this is the first time such technology is available on a production vehicle, Fox Racing has been providing this shock technology to the U.S. military and its allies. Our Army HMMWV Humvees and the British Royal Army’s MWMIKs (Mobility Weapon Mounted Installation Kit) Supacat infantry-support vehicles use internal bypass shocks for improved off-road performance and reduced wear and tear. Hoo-AH.

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What year Ford Raptor is best?

Conclusion – It’s always been tough picking out a new car. When selecting a used car, you have hundreds of models and years to select from for your future. The Ford Raptor is no different. There are many iterations of this vehicle that have changed over the years.

Some are better than others, and it’s vital you know the difference. The best models of the Ford Raptor are the 2010 and 2020 years, while the worst includes the 2009 model, 2012, and 2014 varieties. With the information we talked about, you can decide which version of the popular and wild vehicle will work best for you.

When you make a big investment, you want to get the most you can for the money you spend. We hope this was helpful for your car-investing future!
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Did Ford make a 2015 Raptor?

Second Generation Ford Raptor – In 2015, Ford released the 13th generation of the Ford F-series of pickups. During the first two years of the new generation of pickups, Ford eventually came out with the 2017 Ford Raptor. As the second generation of the Raptor Ford decided to ditch the SVT name.

  • The new upgrades with the second generation Raptor included an even larger travel increase with the shocks and Chassis, boosting both the front and rear travel to 13 inches.
  • However, the powertrain on this Ford Raptor is a bit different from the first generation.
  • While the 2011-2014 Ford SVT Raptor used only a 6.2L V8, the Raptor does not use a V8 at all.
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Instead, it takes advantage of a 3.5L EcoBoost V6. This is a variation of the engine used in the Ford GT. The particular engine could produce 450 horsepower while the truck also used a 10-speed transmission.
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Is there a 2016 Ford Raptor?

Ford Raptor – This is it, the 2016 Ford F-150 Raptor. 2 of 10 Josh Miller/CNET
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What is the fastest Ford Raptor?

Ordering opens today for the new 2023 F-150 ® Raptor R ™, the most powerful F-150 Raptor ever, featuring a new 5.2-liter supercharged V8 that cranks out 700 horsepower and 640 lb.-ft. of torque for even more extreme off-roading Next-level trail-conquering capability starts with long-travel suspension featuring FOX Live Valve shocks specially tuned to take advantage of the truck’s V8 power; standard class-exclusive 37-inch tires and class-best ground clearance offer improved confidence and control over harsh terrain Supercharged V8 power accentuated by the unique styling of Raptor R, power dome on the hood and desert-inspired graphics; black interior enhanced by genuine carbon fiber streaked with signature Ford Performance Code Orange accents

DEARBORN, Mich., July 18, 2022 – After more than a decade spent braving harsh conditions and conquering massive desert dunes over three generations of off-road trucks, Ford unleashes the new F-150 ® Raptor R ™ – the fastest, most powerful, most extreme high-performance off-road desert Raptor yet.

  • All three generations of F-150 Raptor have been inspired by the extreme desert-racing trophy trucks that compete in the Baja 1000.
  • Designed and engineered by Ford Performance, the 2023 F-150 Raptor R is the closest yet to delivering this type of performance.
  • Raptor R is our ultimate Raptor,” said Carl Widmann, Ford Performance chief engineer.

“When customers experience Raptor R in the desert and beyond, it will make the hairs on the back of their necks stand up – and they’ll love every second of it.” The heart of Raptor R The heart of Raptor R is a new 5.2-liter supercharged V8 engine that delivers 700 horsepower and 640 lb.-ft.

Of torque to give it incredible desert-running power. Ford Performance enlisted the most powerful engine in its lineup – previously seen in the Mustang Shelby GT500 ® – optimizing it for Raptor-level off-road performance and Built Ford Tough ® durability. The result is the most torque-dense supercharged V8 yet in a production pickup.

Ford Performance recalibrated this V8 engine’s supercharger and installed a new pulley to optimize its power for off-road use, increasing torque delivery at the low-end and mid-range. These changes help Raptor R offer more performance at the speeds where customers spend most of their time driving.

To maintain the extreme off-road durability the Raptor brand is known for, Ford Performance upgraded the original engine’s exhaust manifolds to a cast stainless steel design, including a unique oil cooler and filter, plus a deeper oil pan enabling it to tackle aggressive grades while keeping the engine oil cool.

To help the engine breathe better, air intake volume is increased 66% via a wider air intake inlet and a higher-flow, higher-efficiency conical air filter. Built Ford Tough to conquer the desert F-150 Raptor is about more than going fast – it must conquer brutal off-road environments.

Its capability and durability comes from more than a decade of Ford expertise in engineering and torture testing high-performance trucks. Ford Performance upgraded the base truck’s transmission and driveline to help ensure Raptor R can smoothly handle what this V8 can throw at it. Raptor R delivers a 10-speed SelectShift ® transmission with improved calibration.

The truck features a new front axle with a more robust, higher-strength carrier casting and an aluminum-ribbed structural cover to manage the powertrain’s added torque, as well as a unique larger-diameter aluminum driveshaft. A new, specially tuned torque converter with heavy-duty turbine damper and four-pinion rear output assembly makes the truck even better equipped to transfer torque and provide a smoother powertrain feel when driving both on- and off-road.

Drivers get even more control over how their Raptor R expresses its additional power, courtesy of a unique dual exhaust system with a true pass-through muffler and active valve system, with modes for Normal, Sport, Quiet and Baja. These can be adjusted in the MyMode™ feature, allowing drivers to customize multiple settings – including drive, steering, suspension modes and others – and save one as a single mode easily accessed with the press of the “R” button on the steering wheel.

If the heart of Raptor R is the supercharged V8, the soul remains its incredibly capable suspension. The five-link rear suspension features extra-long trailing arms to better maintain axle position on rough terrain, a Panhard rod and 24-inch coil springs – all optimized for outstanding stability while traversing desert terrain at high speeds.

Advanced FOX Live Valve shocks are tuned to balance ride quality and roll control on- and off-road. These electronically controlled dampers use suspension height sensors and other sensors to monitor terrain conditions independently, hundreds of times a second, while adjusting suspension tuning accordingly.

Wheel travel of 13 inches in front and 14.1 inches in back facilitates Raptor R’s ability to traverse sand and rocks with outstanding capability. “We’ve heard our customers demanding the sound and power of a V8 back in Raptor,” said Widmann. “That’s not something we were going to rush.

This supercharged 5.2-liter V8 is the ideal fusion of high-density power paired with the third generation Raptor’s all-new rear suspension and shocks to deliver a one-two punch that goes far beyond the sum of its parts.” Each drive mode is tuned to account for the added power of the supercharged V8, including an optimized Baja mode for maximum performance and control in high-speed off-roading.

A 5% increase in the front spring rate helps maintain comfortable ride quality, while Raptor R boasts class-leading* 13.1-inch ground clearance and standard class-exclusive* 37-inch tires straight from the factory for improved obstacle clearing. Iconic Raptor styling taken to the next level The most powerful Raptor yet takes the off-road truck’s purpose-built design legacy up a notch, with unique styling that further drives home its supercharged capability.

  1. A larger, more aggressively styled power dome on the hood sits nearly 1 inch taller than on the base Raptor, helping extract warm air from underneath.
  2. Iconic F O R D grille, bumpers and fender flares painted black underscore its menacing looks.
  3. Raptor R is visually designed like a desert predator to catch the attention of Raptor customers and off-road enthusiasts,” said Tom Liu, Raptor R lead designer.

“There are details big and small – from the more aggressive hood air extractor to the Code Orange ‘R’ badges – that visually communicate next level off-road performance under the Raptor R banner.” Ford Performance-exclusive Code Orange accents include a unique “R” badge on the grille, power dome and tailgate.

A special graphics package on the rear fenders feature a unique design that mirrors the harsh, cracked desert earth, reinforcing the type of environment Raptor R is built to conquer. That aggressive feel carries over to a black interior. Standard Recaro ® seats sport a combination of black leather and Alcantara ® suede – cleverly placed for added grip when the terrain gets nasty.

Genuine carbon fiber adorns the doors, media bin door and upper parts of the instrument panel, featuring a unique tri-axial weave designed to convey Raptor R’s combination of performance, toughness and durability. Like the rest of the Raptor family, Raptor R comes standard with a suite of smart technology to make off-roading easier.

  • Trail Turn Assist** allows drivers to shrink their turning radius on tight turns and go even further off-road.
  • Ford Trail Control ™ – think cruise control for off-roading – lets drivers select a set speed and steer through challenging conditions while the truck handles throttle and braking.
  • Trail 1-Pedal Drive † allows customers to control throttle and braking with just one pedal to make extreme off-roading like rock crawling even easier.

Keeping you connected is a standard 12-inch touch screen with SYNC ® 4 technology, Apple CarPlay ® and Android Auto ™ compatibility ††, Raptor R also benefits from Ford Power-Up over-the-air software update capability ‡, These wireless updates can offer improvements throughout the vehicle – from the SYNC system to enhanced quality, capability and convenience upgrades that improve the ownership experience over time.

F-150 Raptor R will be available in eight color options, including new Avalanche and Azure Gray Tri-Coat exterior paint offered on the Raptor lineup for the first time. Ordering for F-150 Raptor R opens today and production starts late 2022 at Dearborn Truck Plant. Contact your dealer for more information.

# # # *Class is full-size pickups under 8,500 pounds GVWR. **Driver-assist features are supplemental and do not replace the driver’s attention, judgment and need to control the vehicle. It does not replace safe driving. See owner’s manual for details and limitations.

† One-Pedal Drive is an extra driving aid. It does not replace the driver’s attention and judgment, or the need to apply the brakes. See owner’s manual for details and limitations. †† Requires phone with active data service and compatible software. SYNC 4 does not control third party products while in use.

Third parties are solely responsible for their respective functionality. ‡ FordPass Connect (optional on select vehicles), the FordPass app and complimentary connected service are required for remote features (see FordPass terms for details). Connected Service and features depend on compatible AT&T network availability.
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Is the Raptor faster than an F-150?

The Ford F-150 was fully redesigned for 2021, which means the most hardcore variant — the F-150 Raptor — is new too. Edmunds recently tested a few F-150 variants, and as you can discern from the headline, the results were a mix of surprise and disappointment.
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How many miles will a Raptor last?

How many miles will a Ford Raptor last? – It’s difficult to say exactly how many miles a Ford Raptor will last, as a Raptor’s life expectancy depends greatly on how much wear and tear the truck undergoes both on and off the road. The latter is especially important, given that this truck was crafted by Ford specifically for extreme off-roading.

And that’s exactly how many owners put their Raptors to use. In general, most Raptors can be expected to last up to around 300,000 miles. But again, it’s a rough estimate at best. Something to also keep in mind is the fact that the oldest Raptors to date have only been around for 11 years, so tracking one down that’s banked more than 100,000 miles is rare.

One known flaw of the Raptor that has surfaced is that the truck is known to quickly begin to rust in the first years of its life. While this doesn’t affect the Raptor’s lifespan, it does lower its resale value. So spraying the entire vehicle, including its undercarriage, with an additional rust protector is highly recommended as soon as possible.
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Which truck is better Ram TRX or Ford Raptor?

Winner: 2022 Ford Raptor -, Simply put, the Ford Raptor can tow more – and carry more – than the Ram TRX., Specifically, the Ford Raptor’s maximum payload is 1,400 pounds, while its conventional towing capacity is a whopping 8,200 pounds. The Ram TRX falls short, but not by much.

  1. It’s rated for a precise 1,310/8,100 pounds, respectively.
  2. That figure might come as a surprise to Ram fans, who are accustomed to their trucks hauling well over 12,000 pounds, depending on the model.
  3. Overall, if towing is a chief priority for you, a super-truck designed for speed may not be the right fit.

Check out our list of the best full-size trucks of 2022. The Winner Is,
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How much is a Ford Raptor 2014?

Prices for a used 2014 Ford F-150 Raptor currently range from $25,999 to $94,999, with vehicle mileage ranging from 41,880 to 182,705.
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Does Ford still make V8 Raptors?

  • The 2023 F-150 Raptor R represents Ford’s most powerful pickup.
  • Ford stuffed the 5.2-liter supercharged V8 from its Mustang Shelby GT500 under the hood and retuned it to make 700 hp and 640 lb-ft of torque.
  • The Ford F-150 Raptor R is available to order now,

The F-150 Raptor launched into the Ford lineup and off of desert jumps all the way back in 2010. The trophy-truck-inspired Raptor’s suspension was the star of the show, but its growling 6.2-liter V8 wasn’t far behind. As Ford pivoted away from V8s and toward smaller turbocharged engines, the Raptor lost its V8,

  • Even though the EcoBoost-powered Raptor made more power than its predecessor, that V8 vacuum helped open the door for the Hellcat-powered Ram TRX,
  • Well, it seems like the folks at Ford have listened to the fans, and have officially brought the V8 Raptor back as the long-expected F-150 Raptor R.
  • Powering this Raptor R is, effectively, the same Predator V8 found under the hood of the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500,

This supercharged 5.2-liter DOHC V8 sends 700 hp and 640 lb-ft of torque through a ten-speed automatic transmission and into the Raptor’s four-wheel-drive system. This is obviously down compared to the GT500’s figures, but it’s in lockstep with Ram’s desert racer’s 702 hp and 650 lb-ft of torque —likely, that’s not an accident.

Part of the dip in power could be due to the revised supercharger and altered pulley diameter that work to boost mid- and low-range power. Finishing off the engine is a set of cast stainless-steel exhaust manifolds and a conical air filter. Those manifolds feed an active exhaust system that features a pass-through muffler design.

While the V8 is the star of the Raptor R, it’s not the only upgrade over the standard F-150 Raptor. Ford says it recalibrated the 10-speed automatic to work better with the 5.2-liter V8. The company also upgraded the front axle, with a more robust carrier casting and a structural aluminum cover.

  1. Ford also employed a heavier-duty torque converter between the engine and transmission.
  2. Controlling the standard 37-inch tall tires is a five-link suspension at the rear and double-wishbone suspension at the front.
  3. This is the same basic design found on the standard F-150 Raptor.
  4. Fox Live Valve shocks control the bumps and dips while adjusting on the fly based on inputs from various sensors.
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Surprisingly, the Raptor R sees a 5% increase in spring rate from the front springs. The interior is basically the same as the standard-issue Raptor. Notable exceptions are the Recaro seats are now standard, and the Raptor R introduces customizable drive modes that can be triggered by the R button on the steering wheel.

Extra badging on the interior will also remind you that you’re in the Raptor R, but the same 12-inch Sync 4 touchscreen jumps between models. The Ford Raptor R is set to launch at a staggering $109,145, which puts a little ahead of a loaded Ram TRX, That’s a lot of money for a pickup, but not that shocking when you think about quickly rising pickup prices, and the cost of the 5.2-liter engine.

If you want to add one of these to your stable, Ford says you can order one today. Do you think the Ford F-150 Raptor R can make up lost ground from the Ram TRX? Let us know your thoughts below. Wesley Wren Wesley Wren has spent his entire life around cars, whether it’s dressing up as his father’s 1954 Ford for Halloween as a child, repairing cars in college or collecting frustrating pieces of history—and most things in between.
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What truck has 700 hp?

DETROIT — As Ford Motor ramps up production of its electric F-150 pickup, it’s not giving up on offering new, highly profitable performance models with gasoline engines. The Detroit automaker Monday morning unveiled the F-150 Raptor R, a new version of its high-performance, off-road pickup with a supercharged 5.2-liter V-8 engine that produces 700 horsepower and 640 foot-pounds of torque.
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What is Chevy’s version of the Raptor?

Pure Power: 2022 Ford F-150 Raptor – The Raptor provides a little more power than the Chevy ZR2, compliments of its high-output 3.5-liter turbocharged V6 engine. It’s also specially designed for desert racing, with Fox racing shocks and a Baja drive mode. Of course, the Raptor’s four-wheel-drive system with low-range gearing also helps you scale mountains and tramp through muddy river banks.2022 Ford Raptor specs include:

Turbocharged 3.5L high-output EcoBoost V6 (450 horsepower, 510 lb-ft of torque) 10-speed SelectShift automatic transmission with Progressive Range Select and paddle shifters Four-wheel drive

It might not be as powerful as the Raptor, but the Silverado ZR2 is an off-road-ready beast in its own right. Its 420-horsepower V6 engine and standard four-wheel drive help you crush it on the trail. And the automatic transmission includes paddle shifters, giving you better control over your performance, no matter where you are.2022 Chevy ZR2 specs include:

6.2L EcoTex3 V8 engine (420 horsepower, 460 lb-ft of torque) 10-speed automatic transmission with Electronic Precision shift Four-wheel drive

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Is a Ford Raptor a supercar?

RAPTOR MAY BE A BAKKIE. BUT IT’S ACTUALLY A SUPERCAR – Auto.
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Is the Raptor twin-turbo?

Overview – The Ford F-150 Raptor is a SCORE off-road trophy truck living in an asphalt world. It wears extra-wide fenders, long-travel suspension, big tires, and the high-performance demeanor of a Baja-bashing race truck. Most Raptors are powered by a twin-turbo 450-hp V-6 bolted to a 10-speed automatic transmission and will remain so in 2023.

However, an even wilder, more powerful Raptor R is coming for 2023 using a version 700-hp version of the Mustang Shelby GT500 ‘s supercharged 5.2-liter V-8, which will finally give the 702-hp Ram TRX something intimidating to snort at. While the R comes standard with 37-inch BFGoodrich K02 tires, standard rubber for twin-turbo V-6 models measures at 35 inches, but 37s are optional.

Despite the Raptor’s enormity, it has one of the smoothest rides we’ve experienced in a full-size pickup. That long-travel suspension, which is specifically designed to absorb the bumps, dips, and jumps of high-speed off-roading, is wonderfully soft and forgiving over everyday potholes and lumpy pavement.
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Is the Ford Lightning faster than the Raptor?

We’ve just tested a 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning, a top Platinum trim with a $93,609 sticker price. It’s far and away quicker than any other F-150, running neck and neck with a Mustang Mach 1 through the quarter-mile. It’s also far quieter than other F-150s and more than 300 pounds lighter than a Rivian R1T, but the brakes faded significantly during our testing.

It’s hard to imagine anyone not being blown away by the heroic shove of the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning’s two electric motors making a combined 580 horsepower and 775 pound-feet of torque. Nail the throttle from rest and 60 mph arrives in 4.0 seconds flat, on its way to a 12.7-second quarter-mile at 107 mph, just before it hits its 110-mph governed top speed.

Our test vehicle was a top-trim Platinum that includes the larger, 131.0-kWh battery pack, and, with a couple of minor options, wore a sticker price of $93,609. The performance of this first electric F-150 positively dominates any other in Ford’s truck lineup, including the Raptor, by more than a second in either metric.

Even a Mach-E GT is no quicker in the quarter-mile. And a Mustang Mach 1 would have to be exceptionally well driven to open up the narrowest of gaps in the quarter. The Rivian R1T is substantially quicker —nearly a second in the quarter-mile—and is still the quickest pickup we’ve ever tested, Michael Simari | Car and Driver Braking was a different story, with the Lightning’s stoppers fading significantly during our six-stop routine from 70 mph. Although it delivered a solid 180-foot stop (we report the second-best number of the six), after the third one a warning light came on to indicate the brakes were overheating, along with significant fade and smoke, to the point that the truck couldn’t keep ABS engaged on the later stops.

Although our test may seem extreme, it gives us pause about using the upper reaches of the Lightning’s maximum 10,000-pound towing capacity (8500 pounds max for Platinum trims like ours). Many other pickups handle the abuse without complaint, including the heavier Rivian. That’s right: at 6855 pounds, our top-trim Lightning Platinum, 1500-pound battery pack and all, weighed more than 300 pounds less than the smaller R1T.

That’s also within 100 pounds of a Ram 1500 TRX, Until now, we never thought we’d be impressed by the mass of anything this heavy. But, in light of the Hummer EV’s 9000-pound curb weight, the Lightning is practically a Miata. (That might be overstating it, but the Lightning is nearly a Miata lighter than the Hummer).

In addition to being the quickest F-150, the Lightning is also the quietest. We measured a mere 65 decibels at a steady 70-mph cruise. That’s solidly quieter than both the R1T and any other F-150. Although some may think all EVs are similarly silent, wind and road noise are still significant factors at highway speeds, and the hulking Lighting pulls off the impressive feat of being quieter than any Tesla we’ve ever tested.

Maximum cornering certainly isn’t the Lightning’s forte, but it put up a decent 0.77 g on the skidpad, which is in the ballpark with other full-size trucks. Get it pointed in a straight line, though, and prepare to be wowed. This content is imported from OpenWeb. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.
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How much will the Raptor R cost?

  • Ford’s Raptor R returns the V8 to the Raptor lineup with a variant of the 5.2-liter supercharged mill from the Mustang Shelby GT500.
  • The off-road truck features effectively the same suspension as a 3.5-liter-V6-powered Raptor that’s equipped with 37-inch tires, though it does have revised spring tuning to compensate for the engine.
  • The Ford Raptor R is expected to hit dealers before the end of the year with a starting price of $109,145.

Ford’s F-150 Raptor launched back in 2010, carried SVT badging, and offered a choice of V8 engines: a 5.4-liter V8 if you didn’t want to tack on any extra charges, or a 6.2-liter V8 if you wanted the top dog Raptor. Ford’s V8 Raptor ran until 2014 before taking a short hiatus, returning in 2017 as a better truck in almost every way, but its turbocharged V6 exhaust note left a lot to be desired.

  • While Ford has stuck with its EcoBoost for the Raptor, the company is again unleashing a V8 under its Raptor R’s hood for stepped-up performance.
  • Diving into the heart of Ford’s latest Raptor, the 5.2-liter V8 goes by the nickname Predator and shares most of its hardware from the potent Ford Mustang Shelby GT500, though there are some minor alterations.

The supercharger is effectively the same Eaton blower from the Shelby but now sports new badging. The harmonic balancer is different than in the Shelby’s mill, as well as the blower pulley. The different supercharger pulley helped Ford engineers move the power lower in the rev range than the Shelby, which is more beneficial than high RPM performance in this application.

All of this works together to send 700 hp and 640 lb-ft of torque through the 10-speed automatic transmission. That’s not bad. Now, how does that stack up against the Raptor R’s two biggest competitors? The biggest thorn in the Raptor R’s side will probably be its EcoBoost-powered stablemate: the base F-150 Raptor.

Ford’s 3.5-liter turbocharged Raptor sends 450 hp and 510 lb-ft of torque through a similar 10-speed transmission. The Raptor R’s other competition is Ram’s 1500 TRX, The Ram makes more power than the Raptor R, cranking 702 hp and 650 lb-ft of torque from its 6.2-liter supercharged V8.

With a tight race at to the top of the Baja-inspired super trucks, how does the Raptor R’s spec sheet translate to real-world performance? Well, it’s hilarious. Just like the Ram TRX, the Raptor R is as absurd a vehicle as you’re going to find. Power delivery is manageable, though that might be a challenge with the truck in its Baja exhaust mode.

The Predator V8 sounds exquisite screaming through the Raptor R’s dual exhaust. Supercharge noise, too, makes its way into the cabin to remind you that your truck is ludicrous, Almost as surprising as the Raptor R’s exhaust note in Sport and Baja modes, the Quiet exhaust mode is a work of magic.

On the highway, there’s almost no noise coming from the back of your Raptor, and you only hear a hint of burble and supercharger whine while you’re tipping into the throttle. All in, the exhaust of Ford’s Raptor R fixes the Raptor’s biggest problem: the exhaust note. The Raptor R gets airborne just as easily as its EcoBoost sibling despite packing around 100 more pounds.

That said, power delivery is similar to the Ram TRX. The number differences are negligible, but both scuttle you away from a stop in a hurry. On road, Ford’s Raptor R does offer more acceleration than the less-powerful base Raptor, but stoplight acceleration doesn’t really matter.

In the dirt, you really can’t go wrong with any of these Baja brawlers. Power aside, the Raptor R is effectively set up the same as the 37-inch-equipped Raptor. The suspension is largely unchanged, which means there’s a five-link suspension controlling the rear stick axle and a double-wishbone controlling the independent front suspension.

Fox Racing shocks are electronically controlled and dampen on demand, just like in the base Raptor. This means that the only major change when you’re out in the dunes is the folks around you will hear you better with the screaming V8 and you have more power to get bigger air.

  • From experience, the Raptor R gets airborne just as easily as its EcoBoost sibling despite packing around 100 more pounds. Yes.
  • The Raptor R can still get air with its heavier powertrain.
  • Ford On road, the Raptor R is surprisingly livable.
  • It’s not the easiest to maneuver in tight city centers, and seeing over the hood—which now features a bump to add extra engine clearance—can be challenging because of the Raptor R’s height, but the Raptor R’s throttle is easy to control and guide it around peacefully.

At highway speeds, the large tires take some getting used to, and the Raptor R will want to wander slightly. Noise is an obvious problem from the BFGoodrich K02 tires, but Ford managed to keep wind noise at bay. Inside the cabin, the Raptor R is basically the same as the Raptor.

There are some minor changes with badging, but the interior is still a truck despite the price increase. The front seats are bolstered well and hold you while ripping around off-road but are also comfortable and stylish. There is a distinct lack of soft-touch materials in the interior, which might confuse some at this price point.

That said, you’ll be thanking Ford for the smooth plastic finishes when it comes time to clean out your Raptor R after a day on the trails or in the dunes. The Ford F-150 Raptor obviously already carries a premium price tag and will set you back $78,570.

  • Adding the V8 tacks on $30,000 to the bottom line (or almost a second Ford F-150).
  • Ford’s Raptor R starts at $109,145, and that price will go up with options and the inevitable “dealer market adjustments,” That’s a big jump even compared to Ram’s 1500 TRX, which starts just north of $80,000.
  • Even with the big price tag, the folks at Ford are expecting a 25 percent mix of Raptor Rs for 2023.

The big jump in price may be hard to justify because all of these trucks are supremely capable, hilariously fun, and pack a lot of attitude in the mall parking lot. That said, the days might be numbered for these absurd, V8-powered monsters, and this could be near the end of the road for over-the-top performance pickups with internal combustion powerplants.
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How much is the cheapest raptor?

Find a New Ford F-150 Raptor Near You TrueCar has 482 new Ford F-150 Raptor models for sale nationwide, including a Ford F-150 Raptor SuperCrew 5.5′ Box 4WD. Prices for a new Ford F-150 Raptor currently range from $72,005 to $151,150.
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How long will a 2010 Ford Raptor last?

In general, most Raptors can be expected to last up to around 300,000 miles. But again, it’s a rough estimate at best. Something to also keep in mind is the fact that the oldest Raptors to date have only been around for 11 years, so tracking one down that’s banked more than 100,000 miles is rare.
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How much should I pay for a raptor?

The supercharged V-8-powered Ford F-150 Raptor of truck-lover fantasies has finally arrived. The American automaker revealed the Raptor R on Monday morning, showcasing the off-road truck’s Shelby-sourced 5.2-liter, 700-hp motor, along with a host of other upgrades to ensure performance and reliability on and off the beaten path.

All those upgrades are going to cost you, however, because Ford has priced the Raptor R from $109,145. The Raptor R’s MSRP is a staggering $36,795 increase over the V-6-powered Raptor, and $32,265 more expensive than the truck’s closest competitor, the 702-hp Ram 1500 TRX, Of course, it’s not just the engine you’re paying for.

There’s a new front axle with a stronger casting to handle the extra torque. It’s connected to a new aluminum driveshaft. That’s attached to the same 10-speed automatic, albeit with a new calibration and a beefier torque converter. The Raptor R also gets the normal Raptor’s optional 37-inch tire package as standard, as well as a retuned front spring rate to handle the extra weight.

  1. And don’t forget all of the styling changes made to the exterior and interior.
  2. Ford confirmed to Motor1 the Raptor R will weigh 5950 pounds—not light by any means, but almost identical to the V-6-powered truck, going by measurements taken by our colleagues at Car and Driver,
  3. More importantly, that’s an incredible 916 pounds lighter than the TRX.

That means we should expect the Raptor R to blow the Ram out of the water in any comparison test. Do you think the supercharged V-8 and all of the other upgrades in the Raptor R are worth the price jump? Let us know in the comments. Brian Silvestro Road & Track staff writer with a taste for high-mileage, rusted-out projects and amateur endurance racing.
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How much should I pay for a 2010 Ford f150?

Estimated values for the 2010 Ford F-150 Values based on 12,000 miles driven per year, with no color or options selected

XLT 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail
Outstanding $9,679 $13,307 $15,384
Clean $9,230 $12,636 $14,546
Average $8,481 $11,516 $13,150
Rough $7,508 $10,061 $11,336

table> Harley-Davidson 4dr SuperCrew 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $12,642 $17,742 $20,633 Clean $12,055 $16,847 $19,510 Average $11,077 $15,354 $17,638 Rough $9,806 $13,414 $15,204

table> XLT 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 8 ft. LB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $8,296 $12,201 $14,420 Clean $7,911 $11,586 $13,635 Average $7,269 $10,559 $12,327 Rough $6,435 $9,225 $10,626

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $9,258 $13,817 $16,391 Clean $8,828 $13,120 $15,499 Average $8,112 $11,957 $14,012 Rough $7,181 $10,446 $12,078

table> FX4 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $10,048 $14,674 $17,305 Clean $9,582 $13,934 $16,363 Average $8,804 $12,699 $14,793 Rough $7,794 $11,094 $12,752

table> XL 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,626 $11,773 $14,128 Clean $7,272 $11,179 $13,359 Average $6,682 $10,189 $12,077 Rough $5,915 $8,901 $10,411

table> XLT 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,766 $10,841 $13,150 Clean $6,452 $10,294 $12,434 Average $5,929 $9,382 $11,241 Rough $5,248 $8,196 $9,690

table> XLT 4dr SuperCab Styleside 8 ft. LB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,495 $11,515 $13,792 Clean $7,148 $10,934 $13,041 Average $6,568 $9,965 $11,790 Rough $5,814 $8,706 $10,163

table> STX 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,016 $10,035 $12,310 Clean $5,737 $9,529 $11,639 Average $5,272 $8,685 $10,523 Rough $4,667 $7,587 $9,071

table> XL 4dr SuperCab Styleside 8 ft. LB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,325 $10,510 $12,874 Clean $6,032 $9,980 $12,173 Average $5,542 $9,096 $11,005 Rough $4,906 $7,946 $9,486

table> King Ranch 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $11,179 $15,980 $18,696 Clean $10,660 $15,173 $17,679 Average $9,795 $13,829 $15,982 Rough $8,671 $12,081 $13,777

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $10,644 $15,469 $18,212 Clean $10,150 $14,688 $17,221 Average $9,327 $13,387 $15,568 Rough $8,256 $11,695 $13,420

table> XL 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,928 $12,245 $14,695 Clean $7,560 $11,627 $13,895 Average $6,947 $10,597 $12,562 Rough $6,150 $9,258 $10,829

table> STX 2dr Regular Cab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,496 $10,676 $13,042 Clean $6,194 $10,137 $12,332 Average $5,692 $9,239 $11,148 Rough $5,039 $8,071 $9,610

table> Platinum 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $12,386 $17,329 $20,130 Clean $11,811 $16,454 $19,035 Average $10,853 $14,996 $17,208 Rough $9,607 $13,101 $14,834

table> XL 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,572 $11,701 $14,045 Clean $7,221 $11,111 $13,280 Average $6,635 $10,126 $12,006 Rough $5,874 $8,847 $10,349

table> FX2 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,584 $11,722 $14,070 Clean $7,232 $11,130 $13,304 Average $6,645 $10,144 $12,028 Rough $5,883 $8,862 $10,368

table> King Ranch 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $13,053 $18,405 $21,460 Clean $12,447 $17,476 $20,292 Average $11,437 $15,927 $18,345 Rough $10,125 $13,915 $15,813

table> Platinum 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $12,737 $17,618 $20,388 Clean $12,146 $16,729 $19,278 Average $11,160 $15,247 $17,428 Rough $9,879 $13,320 $15,023

table> XLT 2dr Regular Cab Styleside 8 ft. LB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,214 $10,263 $12,554 Clean $5,925 $9,745 $11,870 Average $5,445 $8,881 $10,731 Rough $4,820 $7,759 $9,251

table> XL 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $5,673 $8,292 $9,784 Clean $5,410 $7,873 $9,251 Average $4,971 $7,176 $8,363 Rough $4,400 $6,269 $7,209

table> King Ranch 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $11,362 $15,925 $18,526 Clean $10,835 $15,121 $17,517 Average $9,956 $13,781 $15,836 Rough $8,813 $12,040 $13,651

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $9,448 $14,035 $16,624 Clean $9,010 $13,326 $15,719 Average $8,279 $12,146 $14,211 Rough $7,329 $10,611 $12,250

table> XL 2dr Regular Cab Styleside 8 ft. LB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $5,604 $8,065 $9,467 Clean $5,344 $7,658 $8,951 Average $4,910 $6,979 $8,093 Rough $4,347 $6,097 $6,976

table> FX2 4dr SuperCab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,576 $10,920 $13,378 Clean $6,271 $10,369 $12,649 Average $5,762 $9,450 $11,436 Rough $5,101 $8,256 $9,858

table> FX4 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $8,151 $11,670 $13,677 Clean $7,772 $11,081 $12,933 Average $7,142 $10,099 $11,692 Rough $6,322 $8,823 $10,079

table> XL 2dr Regular Cab 4WD Styleside 8 ft. LB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,332 $10,354 $12,620 Clean $6,038 $9,832 $11,933 Average $5,548 $8,961 $10,788 Rough $4,911 $7,828 $9,300

table> XLT 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,685 $11,864 $14,236 Clean $7,328 $11,265 $13,461 Average $6,734 $10,267 $12,169 Rough $5,961 $8,970 $10,490

table> XLT 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,559 $11,788 $14,188 Clean $7,208 $11,193 $13,416 Average $6,623 $10,201 $12,128 Rough $5,863 $8,912 $10,455

table> XL 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,291 $11,624 $14,080 Clean $6,953 $11,038 $13,313 Average $6,389 $10,060 $12,036 Rough $5,656 $8,788 $10,375

table> XLT 4dr SuperCab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,979 $10,526 $12,542 Clean $6,655 $9,995 $11,859 Average $6,115 $9,109 $10,721 Rough $5,414 $7,958 $9,242

table> STX 2dr Regular Cab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $5,798 $8,792 $10,493 Clean $5,529 $8,348 $9,922 Average $5,081 $7,609 $8,970 Rough $4,498 $6,647 $7,732

table> SVT Raptor 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $14,495 $16,655 $17,939 Clean $13,822 $15,814 $16,963 Average $12,701 $14,413 $15,335 Rough $11,243 $12,591 $13,219

table> XLT 2dr Regular Cab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,160 $11,050 $13,254 Clean $6,828 $10,492 $12,532 Average $6,274 $9,562 $11,330 Rough $5,554 $8,354 $9,766

table> FX2 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $9,456 $13,812 $16,292 Clean $9,017 $13,115 $15,405 Average $8,286 $11,953 $13,927 Rough $7,335 $10,442 $12,005

table> XL 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 8 ft. LB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,234 $10,438 $12,817 Clean $5,944 $9,911 $12,119 Average $5,462 $9,033 $10,956 Rough $4,835 $7,892 $9,445

table> Harley-Davidson 4dr SuperCrew 4WD 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $13,386 $17,956 $20,578 Clean $12,765 $17,050 $19,458 Average $11,729 $15,539 $17,591 Rough $10,383 $13,576 $15,164

table> XLT 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $8,610 $12,762 $15,124 Clean $8,211 $12,118 $14,301 Average $7,545 $11,044 $12,929 Rough $6,679 $9,648 $11,145

table> Platinum 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $13,215 $18,774 $21,940 Clean $12,602 $17,827 $20,746 Average $11,580 $16,247 $18,755 Rough $10,251 $14,194 $16,167

table> XLT 2dr Regular Cab 4WD Styleside 8 ft. LB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,607 $10,897 $13,324 Clean $6,301 $10,347 $12,599 Average $5,790 $9,430 $11,390 Rough $5,125 $8,238 $9,818

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $11,142 $14,766 $16,848 Clean $10,625 $14,021 $15,931 Average $9,763 $12,778 $14,402 Rough $8,643 $11,164 $12,415

table> Platinum 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $11,989 $16,955 $19,767 Clean $11,432 $16,099 $18,691 Average $10,505 $14,672 $16,897 Rough $9,299 $12,818 $14,566

table> King Ranch 4dr SuperCrew Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $11,612 $16,645 $19,492 Clean $11,073 $15,805 $18,431 Average $10,175 $14,405 $16,663 Rough $9,007 $12,585 $14,364

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,723 $12,183 $14,711 Clean $7,364 $11,568 $13,910 Average $6,767 $10,543 $12,576 Rough $5,990 $9,210 $10,841

table> FX4 4dr SuperCrew 4WD Styleside 5.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $8,596 $12,733 $15,088 Clean $8,197 $12,091 $14,267 Average $7,532 $11,019 $12,898 Rough $6,667 $9,627 $11,118

table> XL 2dr Regular Cab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $5,042 $8,072 $9,789 Clean $4,808 $7,665 $9,256 Average $4,418 $6,985 $8,368 Rough $3,911 $6,103 $7,213

table> XL 4dr SuperCab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,848 $10,046 $11,866 Clean $6,530 $9,539 $11,220 Average $6,000 $8,694 $10,144 Rough $5,312 $7,595 $8,744

table> XLT 2dr Regular Cab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,606 $10,111 $12,097 Clean $6,300 $9,600 $11,438 Average $5,789 $8,750 $10,341 Rough $5,124 $7,644 $8,914

table> STX 4dr SuperCab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $7,550 $10,553 $12,269 Clean $7,200 $10,021 $11,601 Average $6,616 $9,133 $10,488 Rough $5,857 $7,979 $9,041

table> XL 2dr Regular Cab 4WD Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (4.6L 8cyl 4A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $6,097 $10,137 $12,423 Clean $5,814 $9,625 $11,747 Average $5,342 $8,772 $10,620 Rough $4,729 $7,664 $9,154

table> Lariat 4dr SuperCab Styleside 6.5 ft. SB (5.4L 8cyl 6A) with no options

Condition Trade-In Private Party Dealer Retail Outstanding $8,111 $12,498 $14,984 Clean $7,734 $11,867 $14,169 Average $7,107 $10,815 $12,809 Rough $6,291 $9,449 $11,042

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