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How Far Can You Drive On Run Flat Tires Bmw?

How Far Can You Drive On Run Flat Tires Bmw
Main draw – The primary benefit of Run Flat Tires are that you can drive on them. They allow you to continue on your course, driving on a flat 100 miles after all the air is gone. Drivers need not exit their vehicle on busy roadways or not-so-desirable parts of town, but instead safely reduce their speed until they arrive at the location they need.
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How fast can you drive on a BMW run-flat tire?

WHAT ARE RUN FLAT TIRES? – Run flat tires are tires on which you can continue driving after a puncture so you can take time get to an auto shop or find a safe, level area to change your tire, You can’t drive on them indefinitely, though. Check the manufacturer’s specifications to find out how fast and how far you can drive on your run flat tires.
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How many miles are BMW run-flat tires good for?

Nearly every BMW vehicle comes standard with run-flat tires, which allow you to drive on a flat for up to 50 miles. One of the biggest advantages of run-flat tires is not having to change a tire on the side of the road in your nice clothes.
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How far can you run run-flat tires?

Much like a spare tire, a run-flat tire has a limited range and a limited speed. Once you know you’ve lost tire pressure, you should carefully reduce speed to a maximum of 50 mph as soon as possible. Additionally, you shouldn’t drive for more than 50 miles on a run-flat once it loses pressure.
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Can I drive on a BMW flat tire?

Car Guides iStock My new BMW doesn’t have a spare tire. What would happen if I hit a pothole or curb hard enough to cut the tire? Q. I purchased a new BMW and noticed it doesn’t have a spare tire. The dealer said the car had run-flat tires, but I assumed the car also had a spare.

  • What would happen if I hit a pothole or curb hard enough to cut the tire? Can I still drive on it? A.
  • The run-flat tires on your BMW will allow you to drive without air in them for a short period at under around 50 miles per hour.
  • If the tire has a hole in the sidewall, in some cases you can still drive for limited periods, but it should be done slowly as handling and even braking will be compromised.

Most manufacturers don’t recommend driving more than 25 to 75 miles with a damaged run-flat tire. John Paul is AAA Northeast’s Car Doctor. He has over 40 years of experience in the automotive business and is an ASE certified master technician. Email your car question to,
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Why does BMW recommend run-flat tires?

Want to avoid changing your flat tire in not-so-desirable weather conditions like pouring down rain or that awful snow storm? Want to have peace of mind on the open road? Then Run Flat Tires are for you! The benefits are numerous and the safety standards high with Run Flat Tires, which have had a resurgence and increase in popularity as of late.

  1. As the name makes clear, they run flat, and are standard on nearly every BMW sold in America and on 12 percent of new vehicles.
  2. They are the solution for more and more drivers who place safety at the forefront.
  3. Here’s what they are all about! Flat tires can happen anywhere, often at the most inopportune time or place, leaving many people to call for roadside assistance.

Changing a tire is an option, but what if there is no spare or you are uncertain how to use the tire repair kit? These are situations that occur more times than not. Here’s where Run Flat, or zero-pressure, tires come into play. Not only can they support the weight of a vehicle for a short time, providing the driver with approximately 100 miles of range until they reach a repair shop, but they offer better stability after a blow out and a lower vehicle weight overall.
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Can I drive 100 miles on a run-flat tire?

You’ll have safer handling and prevent damage to other parts of your car when all four tires on your vehicle match closely in type, tread depth and size. This is not the case when you mix and match run-flat tires with standard tires. Here’s why. Run-flat tires (RFTs) are built with reinforced sidewalls, which make them a lot stiffer. When there’s a big difference between your front and rear tires’ sidewall flex, your car’s handling will be imbalanced. You won’t have proper stability, especially when you need it most: around corners, at highway speeds and when swerving. Due to the way they’re made, RFTs typically wear out long before standard tires.
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When should I change my BMW run-flat tires?

What Are Run Flat Tires? – Well, the name is pretty self-explanatory. Run flats are tires that are capable of supporting the vehicle on the road after a puncture that would cause a regular tire to lose all internal pressure. These aren’t intended to be driven indefinitely, though—once a run flat has taken a critical puncture, you have about 50 miles or so to find a tire shop before the tire starts failing.

Self-Supporting -These work using reinforced sidewalls (the part of the tire facing outward.) The thicker sidewall has the added benefit of making the side of the tire that much harder to puncture, which is more damaging than a puncture in the tread. Support Ring – This type works using a ring of thick rubber that encircles the rim, which doesn’t allow the rim to scrape against the ground after the tire loses pressure.

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Can I replace my BMW run-flat tires with regular tires?

Can a BMW use regular tires? A growing number of new BMW vehicles are delivered from the factory equipped with, While many owners enjoy the peace of mind that comes with tires that can allow you to drive an extra 50-100 miles when flat, other owners prefer regular tires.

So, can a BMW use regular tires if it came with run-flat tires? If you’re looking for the quick and easy response to that question, the answer is: “Yes, you can use regular tires on your run-flat-equipped BMW.” Of course, there are benefits and drawbacks of regular tires as well as run-flat tires, and we want to help you make the decision that best suits your needs.

One cautious bit of advice, though, if you’re considering changing your BMW’s run-flat tires to regular tires, you must do so on all four tires because of the handling and performance differences between the types of tires. Why switch from run-flat tires to regular tires on a BMW As a way to reduce overall weight of new BMWs, they no longer come with spare tires.

  1. Some models, especially performance-based M vehicles, come with BMW Mobility Kits in place of a spare tire.
  2. Most other models come equipped with run-flat tires.
  3. Also known as zero-pressure tires, these mean you have the assurance that nothing other than a complete tire failure will prevent you from getting to your destination or a service shop, even if you’re on an out-of-town road trip.

There are positive and negative aspects of run-flat tires, however.
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Do run-flats wear faster?

The lou-down on run-flat tires and why they’re not as easy to repair once punctured First time owners of run-flat equipped cars are almost always caught off guard when they arrive at their dealership to have one of those tires repaired due to a nail or puncture.

What they expect is the prompt repair or patch, but what they get is an estimate for a replacement tire. If they are lucky, they will only need to purchase a single tire, but more often or not, if their vehicle is of the all-wheel drive variety, they will be pushed to replace the tires in pairs. So much for a simple tire fix.

Adding further insult to injury, the cost for run-flats in some cases is as much as 30 per cent more than a conventional tire. Run-flats, or zero pressure tires, have one distinct advantage. If you ever do get a flat, they can be driven on with zero tire pressure or for approximately 50-100 kilometres, which should be more than enough time for you to get to an auto repair shop.

  1. Vehicles from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Mini and many Cadillacs come standard with run-flat tires, which accounts for about 14 per cent of the tire market.
  2. These auto manufacturers save on weight, which boosts fuel economy due to the lack of spare tire, jack and tool kits.
  3. This fuel economy boost may be minimal, but the engineers at these car companies know that most of their customers don’t change their own tires and instead opt for roadside assistance, so why not take the weight savings? In addition to the added cost as mentioned above, reduced tread wear is a common complaint for run-flat tires; in other words, they wear out faster.

The sidewall does all the work in any zero-pressure situation and must therefore be reinforced and made of heat-resistant rubber, making them far less pliable than a conventional tire. This thicker sidewall produces a noticeably harsher ride, forcing the tire manufacturer to seek a solution to soften the driving experience.

  1. Using a softer tread compound achieves that and offsets the roughness, but unfortunately does so at the price of tread life.
  2. Indicators that your run-flat tires are indeed flat are difficult to manage for inattentive drivers as there is no obviously flattened tire to catch one’s attention when walking up to your parked car.

Drivers must depend on the Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) to detect any problems. Blowouts still do occur when the driver misses the fact that their tire is flat and drives well past the manufacturers run-flat distance limitations. So, can you repair a run-flat? The answer is a firm maybe.

  1. If the sidewall indicates “do not repair,” then obviously the answer is no.
  2. Alternatively, the tire manufacturer Bridgestone’s FAQ section writes “some punctures may be repaired under certain restrictions.” Finding a tire professional and having them inspect the tire to see if it meets the criteria necessary for repair is mandatory.

However, I highly doubt that your dealer service department is going to offer you that service, as most auto manufacturer literature prohibits run-flat repair. You are free to go outside the car dealer environment and visit a recognized tire dealer for the brand in question and ask them for a second opinion.

Can you replace your run-flats with conventional tires? There is no law saying you can’t, but it is rarely recommended. Most run-flats-equipped vehicles are typically heavier European sport sedans that specify extra load (XL) rated tires. Matching tire sizing with proper load and speed ratings usually limits available tires to a select few, which of course, are mostly run-flats.

There may be a couple of manufactures of conventional tires that meet all the specific criteria, and you are free to install them on your car, but you probably shouldn’t. To me, it’s kind of like people who buy vehicles that require premium fuel but always try and get away with regular.
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Does driving on a run-flat tire ruin it?

Driving on a flat tire might not seem like an issue, especially if you only drive your car a short distance to get to a repair shop. However, driving on a flat tire is dangerous and can cause severe damage to your tire and your car.
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Can I drive on a run-flat tire with 0 psi?

What happens when a run-flat tire goes flat Run-flat tires aren’t new, first debuting back in the 1930s. Run-flat tires are still used today, using a reinforced sidewall that can support a vehicle’s weight after the tire experiences a total loss of air pressure.

  • In theory, this should allow you to reach a service center to fix or replace the tire, but what actually happens when a run-flat tire goes flat? Rewind to last weekend, when the passenger-side rear tire of my 2018 640i Gran Turismo test car had a brief encounter with a Detroit-style pothole.
  • Normally in this situation, I’d just pull over, get the spare, swap ’em out and be on my way.

But the Bimmer, shod in 245/45R19 Pirelli P-Zero run-flat tires, required a different approach. I was about 10 miles from civilization at the time of the blowout, well below the run-flat tires’ recommended driving distance of 50 miles. The warning screen on the 640i’s iDrive said I could safely drive as fast as 50 miles per hour, but with severe vibration coming through the chassis, the car pulling to the right and emitting a terrible grinding noise, I never went above 25 mph. Reinforced sidewalls allow run flat tires to be useable even at 0 psi. Pirelli Despite appearing fine at first glance, the tire was actually severely damaged. The inner sidewall had a large gash and the impact was hard enough that it even bent the 640i’s wheel.

The BMW had to be towed to a dealership some 50 miles away (a free service through the manufacturer). Two days later, it was back on the road. Run-flat tires are expensive; a replacement P-Zero costs over $420 with labor and taxes. In my case, the repair cost was not covered by BMW, and while Pirelli has its own warranty, it’s conditional.

According to the company, a tire can be replaced free of charge if it “becomes unserviceable due to workmanship or materials anomalies or road hazard injury during the initial warranty period, which is one year from the date of original retail purchase of the vehicle or purchase of replacement tires (purchase receipt required) or within the first 2/32-inch of the original usable tread, whichever occurs first.” But even then, the tire has to be individually inspected by claims adjusters, and might not end up being covered. Yikes! While all was fine on the outside of the wheel, the inside was a different story. Emme Hall/Roadshow Furthermore, while standard tires can often be repaired, run-flats are much harder to fix. In fact, Pirelli specifically does not recommend you repair a damaged run-flat, since driving on the tire with little to no pressure can wreak havoc on the internal structure, rendering them unsafe.

  1. Warranty and repair guidelines differ between tire manufacturers, but even if you encounter a nail in the road or some other easily repairable puncture, in the specific case of this BMW, you’re looking at a costly brand-new tire every single time.
  2. Something else to consider: My incident occurred in a well-populated area of Northern California.
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What if I had been, say, on Highway 50 in Nevada? Dubbed the Loneliest Road in America, there isn’t a BMW dealership within 250 miles. Not having a spare tire onboard isn’t the smartest idea if you frequently find yourself in rural settings. And if you think you’ll find a P-Zero run-flat on hand at any old tire shop, think again.

Because these tires aren’t fitted to most vehicles, many repair shops don’t stock them. The other big run-flat tradeoff is how these tires negatively affect a car’s ride and handling characteristics. The thicker sidewalls not only result in increased road noise, but a harsher overall ride quality. In the case of a I recently tested, the run-flat tire option made it too crashy to drive daily.

There’s a lot to be said for the reassurance of driving on a flat after you’ve had a puncture, but if you want my advice, skip the run-flats. One-time, conditional convenience is nice, but in the big picture, run-flats are likely more trouble than they’re worth.
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How do BMW run-flat tires work?

How do run flat tyres work? – Unlike conventional tyres, which require air to stay hard, run flat tyres have a reinforced sidewall, meaning they stay rigid without any air pressure. The reinforced outer shell of run flat tyres keeps the rubber in place without air, supporting the car as you continue your journey.
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Can I drive 10 minutes on a flat tire?

Should I Drive on a Flat Tire? – No. Do not drive on a flat tire. However, it may be necessary to travel a short distance on a flat tire when pulling over to the side of the road. But driving on a flat tire is a surefire way to put your passengers at risk and seriously damage your vehicle.

If your vehicle is equipped with Bridgestone Run-Flat tires, you can typically drive 50 miles at up to 50mph on a punctured tire*. Not only does driving on a flat tire dangerously decrease your vehicle’s handling, it may cause structural damage to the wheel, brakes, alignment, and potentially other components like your suspension and steering system.

It may be tempting to “limp” your car to the nearest repair shop, but by driving on a flat, you’ll likely end up paying to repair much more than just the tire. So if you’re not supposed to drive on a flat, what should you do instead? The first thing to do is safely maneuver to the side of the road so you can address the problem properly.

From there, you’ve got a few options. First, you can either replace the flat with your spare tire or use an emergency sealant to fill any punctures. It’s worth noting, however, that emergency sealants typically only seal tires with punctures that are ¼ inch or smaller. They will not help if your tire is shredded, blown out, or has a large puncture.

If you don’t have a spare and sealant won’t do the trick, it’s time to call Firestone Roadside Assistance, Whether you need a tire change, a tow to the nearest auto shop, or other emergency automotive services, Firestone Roadside Assistance is ready to help 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
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What brand of run-flat tires does BMW use?

BMW cars have been at the forefront of the driving experience since the company was founded in 1916. Their impressive engineering includes a successful line-up of coupes, sedans, hybrids and SUVs. However, when it comes to choosing tires for your BMW, Bridgestone has several great options.

  • Whichever model you drive, Bridgestone is the right choice for your BMW.
  • If you’re looking for high performance, Potenza tires are designed for speed and deliver control, responsiveness, and handling.
  • Turanza tires are ideal for BMW drivers who want a smooth driving experience.
  • Our DriveGuard run-flat tires are designed to take a puncture and keep your BMW moving for up to 50 miles at up to 50 mph.* Dueler tires strive for power and toughness for your BMW SUV, allowing you to explore challenging terrains.

And when the temperature drops and winter driving conditions are at their worst, you’ll want Blizzak for your BMW tires. If you want to maximize the capabilities of your BMW, Bridgestone tires have the technologies to satisfy your needs. Check out our Tire Catalog to find the perfect set of tires for your BMW car or SUV.
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Are run-flat tires worth the extra money?

Pro: No changing a flat tire by the side of the road – This, of course, is the greatest advantage of tires with run-flat technology. Even without air, they let you keep driving so you can get home, get to work, or get to a repair shop. Their thicker sidewalls allow you to drive at up to 50 mph until the tire is repaired.

Even those who know how to change a tire are often uncomfortable doing so by the side of the road with traffic whizzing by. Woody Rogers, a spokesman for TireRack.com, the nation’s largest online tire retailer, says someone is killed or injured in the U.S. every three to four days trying to change a tire on the side of the road, based on news reports.

That’s not a risk most people are willing to take. Next: Peace of Mind at a Price Ask car buyers whether their new car has a spare tire and most will say “of course it does.” In many cases, however, today’s new vehicles come without spare tires. Instead, they are equipped with tire repair kits or run-flat tires.

  • Run-flat tires won’t leave you stranded at the side of the road or force you to dig out your spare and change a tire,
  • They’re not perfect, though, as a catastrophic tire failure can leave your car disabled without a spare tire, and run-flat tires are expensive to replace.
  • In case of a puncture or other tire failure, run-flat tires use stiff, self-supporting sidewalls that allow the car to continue down the road with very little air pressure.

Often, the only indication that you have a flat comes from the car’s tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) light on the dashboard., The reason for the demise of the spare tire is that automakers can save a significant amount of weight by not including the heavy tire, wheel, jack, and lug wrench.

  1. Every ounce of weight they don’t put into the vehicle increases the vehicle’s fuel efficiency.
  2. Most drivers never use their spare, instead calling for roadside assistance.
  3. Consumers should consider the pros and cons of run-flat tires when they’re looking at a new car or replacing their existing tires.

Explore the following slides to see the positives and the downsides of traditional tires versus run-flat tires. Pro: No changing a flat tire by the side of the road This, of course, is the greatest advantage of tires with run-flat technology. Even without air, they let you keep driving so you can get home, get to work, or get to a repair shop.

  1. Their thicker sidewalls allow you to drive at up to 50 mph until the tire is repaired.
  2. Even those who know how to change a tire are often uncomfortable doing so by the side of the road with traffic whizzing by.
  3. Woody Rogers, a spokesman for TireRack.com, the nation’s largest online tire retailer, says someone is killed or injured in the U.S.

every three to four days trying to change a tire on the side of the road, based on news reports. That’s not a risk most people are willing to take. Con: Limited selection and availability Given the wide variety of cars on the market and the fact that many have different tire types and sizes for different trim levels, there are thousands of tires to choose from.

  1. Among those, only a small portion feature run-flat technology.
  2. Most run-flat tire models are designated as original equipment tires for new cars rather than replacement tires.
  3. Only Bridgestone makes a full line of run-flat replacement tires for used vehicles.
  4. Their DriveGuard lineup of tires can be fitted to many sedans, crossovers, minivans, and wagons,

, Tire retailers try to stock the most popular types of tires for cars already on the road, so if you have a blowout and need a replacement tire for a newer car, they can sometimes be hard to find or take some time to order. That can be especially inconvenient if you’re on a long trip, and not just commuting.

  • It’s worth noting that most run-flat tires have their own model names, rather than having run-flat and non-run-flat models under the same name.
  • Pro: You can get home or to a repair shop Most run-flat tires are capable of going up to 50 miles at 50 mph with no air in them.
  • That’s enough to get home without having to change the tire.

Run-flat tires have stiffer sidewalls that are designed to hold the wheel off the ground while you drive, even when deflated., However, rolling on a run-flat’s stiff sidewalls causes them to flex repeatedly, and they can bend only so many times before they fail completely.

The faster you drive, the fewer miles they can go. Fifty miles at a speed of 50 mph with a full load in the car is the minimum standard for tires labeled as run-flats., Once you get your car home or to a repair shop, it’s much easier and safer to change the tire or to wait for a tow truck while you get work done – even if you have to wait a few days for a replacement tire.

Con: They can cost a little more Quite a few automotive reviewers and consumers have complained that run-flat tires can be expensive to replace.J.D. Power published a study in 2013 showing that run-flat tires last an average of 6,000 fewer miles than non-run-flats (partly because tires should be changed in pairs, and since run-flats can’t be patched, drivers often have to replace a second, undamaged tire along with the flat one).

  1. The study also noted that run-flat tires cost more to replace.
  2. We asked the folks at the TireRack.com, America’s largest online tire retailer, to run a cost comparison for us of run-flat and non-run-flat tire options to go on the same cars.
  3. They found that only a few cars offered a choice of run-flat or non-run-flat tires in the same size and specification.

In many cases, the costs were similar, varying between a 39-cent difference for Bridgestones on a 2016 BMW 3 Series to just over $50 per tire for Michelins on the same car. The median difference among the tires they examined was $13. If the correct run-flat option for your vehicle is in short supply, it can make the problem worse.

  • That doesn’t necessarily mean run-flats aren’t expensive though.
  • Run-flat tires tend to come on high-performance and luxury cars that have low, wide tires that are expensive by nature.
  • Even the non-run-flat tires for these cars start at almost $150 per tire and run to more than $200.
  • Some early run-flat tire technologies, such as the Michelin PAX system, required specialized tools to repair or replace the tires and their unique inner supports.

Replacement costs for the tires, which are no longer available on new cars, could run as high as $1,600 for a set of four. Pro: They can keep going even if you have a blowout in the sidewall Most flat tires are caused by running over a nail or screw or some other sharp object that punctures the tread.

  • That can be fixed by installing a patch kit and reinflating the tire.
  • That’s the idea behind the tire inflator kits that are coming standard in place of spare tires in many cars.
  • Recently, however, as more cars come with low-profile tires (45-series and lower), says Woody Rogers, a TireRack.com spokesperson, a growing percentage of flat tires are caused by sidewall blowouts.

Such blowouts usually cause large tears in the sidewalls that sealant can’t fix, so the tire has to be replaced., Run-flats can often keep driving even with a gash in the sidewall. So if you’re going to have to replace the blown-out tire anyway, run-flats can at least get you home or off the road.

  • Of course, if the tire damage is too catastrophic for the remains of the tire to support the vehicle’s weight, you’ll have to call for roadside assistance.
  • Con: Hard ride Since the sidewalls have less give, run-flat tires tend to pound harder over bumps than other tires.
  • The latest models have improved in ride quality, Rogers says.

Still, the most comfortable run flat may not be able to match the most comfortable conventional tire when it comes to ride quality., Many vehicles that come from the factory with run-flats feature suspension tuning that takes the characteristics of the tires into account.

  • That’s one reason that some manufacturers don’t recommend replacing them with traditional tires.
  • Pro: Spare tire doesn’t waste space or cost gas A large percentage of spare tires end up in the junkyard at the end of the life of the car they’re in without ever having been used, and they take up valuable space in your trunk or cargo area that you could use for other things.

Compact “donut” spare tires also weigh about 25 pounds. Over time, that takes a toll on fuel economy., Given how few spare tires are ever installed, it’s no wonder more automakers questioning the value of including them at all. Run-flats are a good way to provide the peace of mind that a compact spare does without the extra weight or space.

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Most compact spares also have the limitation of not being driven faster than 50 mph or for more than 50 miles – just like run-flats (though in a pinch, compact spares can go farther). Which Vehicles Have Run-Flat Tires? You can buy aftermarket run-flat tires for a wide variety of vehicles. Currently, few manufacturers offer them from the factory.

BMW is one notable exception, offering run-flats on a number of models, including the 5 Series and 7 Series,, In some cases, certain trim levels of a model will come with run-flat tires, while others do not. The all-wheel-drive version of the 2017 Toyota Sienna, for example, comes on run-flat tires.

You can find out whether a car is riding on them by checking its Monroney window sticker (which will usually note the tire type), its owners manual, or by a symbol on the side of the tire that looks kind of like a quickly moving snail. Self-Sealing Tires Another way that manufacturers are fortifying their cars against tire damage is by installing self-sealing tires instead of traditional tires or run-flats.

They don’t have the sidewall strength of run-flats to continue with no air pressure. Instead, they try to stop the air from getting out of the tire in the first place., By using special rubber compounds inside the tire, a puncture is sealed as soon as it occurs, with no limitations on your driving.

  1. Unless it is a major injury to the tire, your tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) light will likely never alert you to the near-miss.
  2. Self-sealing tires won’t save you from tire failures due to sidewall damage or complete blowouts, however, like a run-flat might.
  3. Conclusion Run-flat tires can be great insurance against getting stranded due to a flat, allowing you to get to a safe, convenient location for a tow or a tire replacement.

They save space and a little gas. Sure, they can be expensive to replace, but not significantly more costly than comparable modern non-run-flat tires. As long as the stiffer ride doesn’t bother you, it’s not a bad idea to consider run-flats for your next car.

  • The key is finding the right tire in the correct tire size for your car and keeping it at the proper inflation level for long life, handling, and comfort.
  • You might still think about adding a spare tire, jack, and lug wrench to your car if you take long road trips that frequently find you more than 50 miles from timely roadside assistance or facilities that can repair a flat tire.

More Shopping Tools From U.S. News & World Report If you’re in the market for a car, U.S. News Best Cars has a number of resources to help you find a great car at an affordable price. Explore our rankings of new cars and rankings of used cars to discover the ride that fits your needs and lifestyle.
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Are BMW run-flat tires good in snow?

Are Run-Flat Tires Good in the Winter? Many newer BMW, Mini, and Mercedes vehicles often come with performance summer tires that happen to be run-flat tires. This has led to the belief that run-flat tires are bad in the winter. But that’s not always the case.

  • We’ve written extensively on summer and winter tires, but here’s a quick refresher: Rubber, like many substances, gets harder in the cold.
  • Yet to maintain a proper grip on the road, a tire must remain soft.
  • Tire manufacturers have developed different compounds that remain soft and pliable in the cold weather.

These are winter tires. They shouldn’t be used in the summer, however, because temperatures get so hot that the softer rubber degrades too quickly. Summer tires offer a different formula. In the summer they are soft and pliable while remaining durable, but get too hard in cold weather.

  1. Additionally, they often come with wider tread blocks that work fine in the rain, but are unsuited for snow.
  2. Season-specific tires are ideal for performance driving situations and locations with large swings in temperature between the summer and winter.
  3. All-season tires offer a middle ground, providing grip and durability year-round, but not the same level of performance as season-specific tires.

So it’s not that are bad in the winter. It’s that summer tires are bad in the winter, and these run-flats just happen to be summer tires. Not only will they provide less grip, hardening in the colder temperatures, they’ll also become more brittle, resulting in faster degradation.

Run-flat tires have the incredible ability to drive normally after a puncture due to their internal structure. A tire’s season is all about the external qualities of the tire— the compound of the tread. The two aren’t related. Why do manufacturers install run-flat tires from the factory? It’s often so they don’t have to include space for a spare tire.

In cars like the Mini, or the rear-wheel-drive BMW or Mercedes offerings, interior space is at a premium. So tires that preempt the need for a spare are often the first choice. Yet many manufacturers who use conventional tires have also stopped including a spare to cut costs.

  1. Instead they’ll give you a can of aerosol tire repair (which doesn’t always work).
  2. The puncture-resistance of modern tires coupled with the growing popularity of and access to roadside assistance services has begun to make the spare tire obsolete.
  3. So why summer run-flats? Many German cars like the aforementioned brands are sold on performance, and most new cars are sold in the spring and summer.

Manufacturers, and sometimes dealerships, merely choose the best tires for the season. While all-season tires tend to work just fine in KC and Dallas 95% of the time, winters still get cold enough in both areas that running summer tires all year long is not a good idea.
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Can you repair a run-flat tire with a nail in it?

But they can give a stiff and bumpy ride, they’re more expensive than conventional tyres and they can’t be repaired meaning you will have to replace them after a puncture.
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Are run-flat tires noisy?

The Disadvantages of Run-Flat Tire Technology –

Comfort: There can be diminished ride quality with the stiffer sidewall. Noise: Some run-flat tires create more road noise inside the vehicle. Repairs: While run-flat tires are repairable within warranty standards, driving without air beyond recommendations can make many repairs impossible. Cost: Most run-flat tires come at a premium price. Availability: Some specific sizes and tread options may not be readily available.

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Can a run-flat tire sit overnight?

Can I Leave A Flat Tire Overnight – Conclusion – Sometimes you can leave a flat tire overnight, but if you jack the car up, you can always leave a flat tire overnight. There are no right and wrong answers here as many factors can sway the answer either way.
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What speed can you do on run flats?

What are runflat tyres, and how do run flat tyres work? | Thursday 3rd June 2021 9:15am Have you ever heard of ? Do you know what they are? Are you aware that your car may be fitted with them? When it comes to, there’s a lot of technical jargon around which can be confusing.

Run flat tyres are just such an example. You may have heard of people talking about them, or seen them mentioned online, but no one clearly explains what they are. If this sounds familiar then don’t worry. In this article Kwik Fit will make things clearer for you. We’ll also provide you with the important info you need to know when it comes to changing your run flats.

Firstly, start by opening the boot of your car. Lift the floor cover up, what do you see? If it’s a spare tyre nestling in the cavity or a foam fillerthen your car isn’t fitted with run flat tyres. However, if you don’t see either then there is a good chance that your car is fitted with run flat tyres – or should be. There are three main advantages to having run flat, the first two of which are to do with safety:

The strengthened sidewall helps keep your car under control in the event of a puncture; You don’t have to change the wheel at the side of the road (one of the most dangerous situations you can put yourself in); No spare wheel means more space in the boot, less overall weight (after all, spare wheels are heavy) and as a result improved fuel efficiency and mileage.

So far so good, but what can be confusing is that run flats look pretty much the same as regular tyres, and increasingly cars being are fitted with them by vehicle manufacturers as “” (OE). Automotive marques like Mini, BMW, Mercedes and many, many more regularly fit tyres as OE, including run flat tyres.

  • As such, you may well be driving a car with run flats without even knowing it.
  • The big difference with run flats is that they feature a reinforced sidewall construction which continues to support your car even,
  • It’s this super-tough construction that allows you to keep driving, safely.
  • It’s a technology that tyre makers like Continental have developed to improve safety and the driver experience.

Continental’s can be found in many of their tyres, including the popular, What’s important, however, is that run flats must be used in conjunction with a, This is important since without the automatic alert the TPMS provides, how would you know you’ve got a puncture? Also important is that, if you do get a puncture, you must not to ignore the run flats’ 50 mile range limit. While this may seem tempting (after all, run flat tyres are more expensive) it’s not a good idea. Run flats often come as ‘Original Equipment’ – the tyres the car is fitted with when it leaves the factory. This often means that the car’s designers will have repurposed the space that would have ordinarily been for a spare tyre, with no spare tyre cavity and hence no spare tyre.

If you replace a run flat it with a non-run flat and then have another puncture, with no spare tyre in your boot you’d be stranded. This is why – if you purchased your car second hand and you’ve discovered there’s no spare wheel in the boot – you must check to see if your tyres are indeed run flats. If you’re not sure how to tell if the tyres on your car are run flats or not, or to get other useful tyre advice and support, head down to your local Kwik Fit centre and speak to one of our expert tyre professionals.

Any facts, figures and prices shown in our blog articles are correct at time of publication. : What are runflat tyres, and how do run flat tyres work?
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What is the maximum speed for a deflated run flat tire?

(Lea en español) Run-flat tires offer drivers temporary extended mobility even after a puncture allows complete air pressure loss. However, even run-flat tires will fail if driven too fast, too far or too heavily loaded when flat. For this reason, run-flat tires may only be used on vehicles equipped with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) that alerts the driver if one or more tires have lost 25% of their recommended inflation pressure.

Illumination of the TPMS warning light identifies that at least one tire is losing/has lost air and establishes the beginning of the extended mobility range the driver can carefully continue driving to escape inclement weather, unsafe surroundings or insufficient visibility, etc. Note that a run-flat tire’s endurance is dependent on operating conditions such as the flat tire’s position on the vehicle, vehicle load, ambient temperature, driving speed and distance traveled.

Run-flat tires cannot be driven faster than 50 miles per hour and typically offer up to 50 miles of extended mobility. Selected applications, based on vehicle and the run-flat tire design, can range from just 25 miles up to 200 miles. Consult your vehicle owner’s manual to determine what you should expect.

Vehicle handling with run-flat tires at zero pressure is different than at full pressure, too. Aggressive acceleration, cornering and braking should be avoided, as well as any unusual service conditions such as carrying heavy loads or towing a trailer. Most tire manufacturers recommend replacement of run-flat tires that have been driven after the TPMS light has illuminated.

Run-flat tires driven with low or no air pressure may have experienced irreparable internal structural damage that is not visible in a non-destructive examination. While most run-flat tires offer a promise of temporary extended mobility at speeds up to 50 miles per hour, Tire Rack recommends driving the slowest safe speed below 50 miles per hour, and the shortest distance to a service facility.
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What happens if you drive fast on a flat tire?

Driving too fast on a spare tire will damage your car – The other very important thing to know is that driving on a spare tire is generally bad for your car and the faster you drive the worse it is. Even without any of the above taking place, when you drive on a spare tire, that corner of your car is having a completely different tread pattern and is a completely different size to other wheels.
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How long should you let your BMW run before driving?

“Warming up” necessary? THE LARGEST BMW 2-SERIES FORUM ON THE PLANET

10-01-2017, 09:18 PM #
Lieutenant Drives: 2016 M2 MG 6-Spd Join Date: Apr 2017 Location: SoCal “Warming up” necessary? Hey all, I was at the gym and talking to one of my buddies with an 08 M5 and he was telling me about how it is still necessary to “warm up” our cars for like five minutes before driving it protect the oil sump or something. Can someone shed some light on this? I have a 17 M240 and I thought with new technology the way it is, warming up is no longer required. I mean obviously don’t be bouncing off red line as soon as you turn on the car but I’ve alwaysnjust driven it easy for the first 2-4 minutes before I drive normally. And again, it’s not like I drive crazy I don’t shift at redline I usually always shift between 3k-5.5k. Any input would be appreciated!!

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10-01-2017, 09:30 PM # Second Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235i 6MT Join Date: Jan 2015 Location: CA Quote:

Originally Posted by K9GunSlinger Hey all, I was at the gym and talking to one of my buddies with an 08 M5 and he was telling me about how it is still necessary to “warm up” our cars for like five minutes before driving it protect the oil sump or something. Can someone shed some light on this? I have a 17 M240 and I thought with new technology the way it is, warming up is no longer required. I mean obviously don’t be bouncing off red line as soon as you turn on the car but I’ve alwaysnjust driven it easy for the first 2-4 minutes before I drive normally. And again, it’s not like I drive crazy I don’t shift at redline I usually always shift between 3k-5.5k. Any input would be appreciated!!
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The way you describe what your buddy does is that he lets the car idle for 5 mins before driving. That’s not a good way to ‘warm up’. You should let the engine come up to temp before hitting it hard though. Usually that’s around 10 minutes. I stay under 3k until 8-10mins has passed. If you don’t the engine will wear quicker.

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10-01-2017, 09:48 PM # Private First Class Drives: 2017 EBII M240i 6MT Join Date: Mar 2008 Location: Washington, D.C. I asked a BMW tech this question a couple weeks ago. He said that modern BMWs get to operating temperature very rapidly. He defined that as 2-3 minutes of driving. To be on the safe side, I usually wait until I’ve driven for 5 minutes before I rev the engine past 3,500 RPMs.

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10-01-2017, 10:10 PM # Old Member. Old in general, actually. Drives: 2018 M240i xDrive convertible Join Date: Feb 2013 Location: Michigan I believe the instructions for my 135is were to drive sensibly until the temp gauge came off the post. That usually took about a mile and a half except in quite cold weather.

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10-01-2017, 10:17 PM # Major Drives: M240i Join Date: Feb 2017 Location: NY All things being equal, the B58 in your M240i will warm up much more quickly than the S85 V10 in your buddy’s M5. “BMW has also stressed temperature management in the B58, more so than in the N55. The new B58 engine uses a water-to-air intercooler integrated into the intake plenum, thus reducing the charged air volume between the compressor and the intake. This increases performance by maintaining more even temperatures inside the intake. BMW has also incorporated an engine-mounted encapsulation system, which allows the engine to retain much of its heat for up to 36 hours which helps to reduce emissions and wear and tear during start-up, especially in colder climates.” _ 2017 M240i AW/ ZF8/ VTT GC turbo/ Dorch Stg 1 HPFP/ E40 Jordan tuned/ xHP Stage 3/ ER catless DP/ Remus axle back/ BMS intake/ FTP CP/ M Performance LSD

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10-01-2017, 10:28 PM # Car Geek Drives: Caterham R400, Macan S Join Date: Mar 2008 Location: Calgary I have found that the B58 in the M240i is the fastest warming up engine in any car I have ever owned, based on the oil and water temperature read outs in the hidden OBC menus. Starting at an ambient temperature of 10°C, it only takes about 1.5km / 2 mins for the oil to reach 50°C, compared with about twice that in our Golf R or other cars I have previously owned.100°C oil temp takes less than 6km / 10 mins of gentle driving. The water temperature also tracks only 5°C or so ahead of the oil temperature during warm up, a very tight difference compared with other cars I’ve had.

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10-02-2017, 01:49 AM # Lieutenant Drives: 2016 M2 MG 6-Spd Join Date: Apr 2017 Location: SoCal Quote:

Originally Posted by aerobod I have found that the B58 in the M240i is the fastest warming up engine in any car I have ever owned, based on the oil and water temperature read outs in the hidden OBC menus. Starting at an ambient temperature of 10°C, it only takes about 1.5km / 2 mins for the oil to reach 50°C, compared with about twice that in our Golf R or other cars I have previously owned.100°C oil temp takes less than 6km / 10 mins of gentle driving. The water temperature also tracks only 5°C or so ahead of the oil temperature during warm up, a very tight difference compared with other cars I’ve had.

What are the hidden OBC menus?! I would love to find out my oil temp. It shocks there isn’t one stock that I can find!!

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10-02-2017, 03:48 AM # First Lieutenant Drives: 2017 m240i Join Date: Sep 2010 Location: SE MI If only BMW could come up with some doo-dad that they could stick on the dash board, and would show the engine oil temp. Oh wait, I know! They could call it the oil temperature gauge! _ Current: 2017 m240i, 2015 X1 xDrive35i Gone, but not forgotten: 2016 GTI PP, 2013 Camaro SS, 2009 G8 GXP, 2008 G8 GT, 2007 335i, 2003 530i

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10-02-2017, 03:52 AM # Lieutenant Drives: 2016 M2 MG 6-Spd Join Date: Apr 2017 Location: SoCal Quote:

Originally Posted by CAMOETO If only BMW could come up with some doo-dad that they could stick on the dash board, and would show the engine oil temp. Oh wait, I know! They could call it the oil temperature gauge!

Yea I wish, My buddies 440i has one, really don’t understand why ours does not.

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10-02-2017, 03:54 AM # First Lieutenant When I do a cold start I wait at least 30 sec before I start moving and try to keep the revs below 2.5k, As you can see from the user manual BMW advises to set off quickly as this warms up all the components like the transmission etc together which helps with the fuel consumption as well as component wear. If you sit and wait your engines going to warm up but the transmission, brakes and all other components will remain cold. They advise the 30 sec so the engine will “wake up”, in this time you can also observe the rpm going down slowly to its idle value. Attached Images Last edited by omera60; 10-02-2017 at 04:07 AM,

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10-02-2017, 11:13 AM # Captain Drives: 2016 228i Msport Join Date: Apr 2017 Location: Texas You should let any car come down off of “high idle” before moving. As sated above, you will see the RPM come down and level off. Allowing the coolant and oil come up to temp slowly is a good thing. Letting everything heat up and expand evenly is a good thing from a metallurgy standpoint. but realistically how much does it matter? Most of you won’t keep your car past 50k miles and even fewer past 100k miles. For me I’m pulling on to the highway soon as I leave home. Not much time to take it easy, so I tend to let the car warm up a few minutes and let the cab cool down.

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10-02-2017, 11:30 AM # Brigadier General Drives: 2016 M235 6MT Join Date: Mar 2016 Location: Kansas City Oil temp is the most critical thing you should be worried about when it comes to engine longevity. Pay absolutely no attention to coolant temp as coolant warms up much quicker. Oil takes much longer to warm up and needs to be at 180 degrees before romping on it. Per my Torque app, a stone N55 in 60 degree weather takes about 8-10 minutes of driving to get to 180 degrees. On a 40 degree day and a cold motor, you’re looking at nearly 15 minutes. On a 20 degree day, it takes a LONG time. Last year I drove 12 miles, highway and city, and my oil temp didn’t get above 170 degrees on a 20 degree day. If the motor is warm and/or it’s summer, the oil will warm up rapidly. Point is, if you want to go heavy throttle, the oil must be up to temp. Also, heavy throttle also includes going 1/2 throttle at low rpms (sub 2500rpms) and in a tall gear (4th and above). This is called heavy load and spools up the turbo quickly and is hell on the crank and rod bearings. The oil needs to be up to temp to create the most protective film strength. As for when to start driving, start the engine and let it idle for 10 to 30 seconds (the longer idle for really cold days) and then start driving moderately.

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10-02-2017, 12:50 PM # Private First Class Drives: 2018 M240xi Join Date: Mar 2017 Location: Kentucky Quote:

Originally Posted by CAMOETO If only BMW could come up with some doo-dad that they could stick on the dash board, and would show the engine oil temp. Oh wait, I know! They could call it the oil temperature gauge!

Looks like they listened for 2018!

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10-02-2017, 01:52 PM # First Lieutenant Drives: 2017 m240i Join Date: Sep 2010 Location: SE MI Quote:

Originally Posted by DailySleeper Looks like they listened for 2018!

Nice! Too bad we can’t code this in for 2017, and BMW thinks that the same exact instrumentation will suffice for a 114i and a m240i _ Current: 2017 m240i, 2015 X1 xDrive35i Gone, but not forgotten: 2016 GTI PP, 2013 Camaro SS, 2009 G8 GXP, 2008 G8 GT, 2007 335i, 2003 530i

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10-02-2017, 03:45 PM # First Lieutenant Drives: M235i Join Date: Jul 2017 Location: WNY Quote:

Originally Posted by DailySleeper Looks like they listened for 2018!

Even though this is at least something, I’d much prefer the temp gauge to be able to be switched out with the instant MPG.

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10-02-2017, 04:41 PM # Colonel Drives: F15d msport, F22 m235i Join Date: Jan 2016 Location: GTA Cold start, wait for RPM’s to drop down, and go! Don’t drive the car hard until at regular operating temp (90*C or higher) is met. Aside from that, the DME will protect against any damage potential, caused by driving the car hard when cold. So I wouldn’t worry too much about it, just don’t let the car sit @ idle too long!

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10-02-2017, 04:49 PM # Want a G20. Drives: 2017 330i Join Date: Jul 2009 Location: Austin. Tx iTrader: ( ) Garage List Quote: _ Past- 2013 135i 2011 135i

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10-02-2017, 04:56 PM # Old Member. Old in general, actually. Drives: 2018 M240i xDrive convertible Join Date: Feb 2013 Location: Michigan Yes found the oil temp setting but I was beaten to the report by DailySleeper. My car was up to operating temp within a mile this morning, outside temperature was around 60. So it comes up pretty quickly.

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10-02-2017, 06:31 PM # Joint Chiefs of Staff Drives: 07-335/12-328/18-M4/21-M4CP Join Date: Sep 2013 Location: Las Vegas Warm up not necessary, You will notice if you have a tune (like the JB4) it wont activate until car reaches a certain temperature

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10-02-2017, 07:07 PM # Car Geek Drives: Caterham R400, Macan S Join Date: Mar 2008 Location: Calgary Quote:

Originally Posted by K9GunSlinger What are the hidden OBC menus?! I would love to find out my oil temp. It shocks there isn’t one stock that I can find!!

This thread gives you the info on how to access the menus:

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10-02-2017, 09:56 PM # Brigadier General Drives: 2016 M235 6MT Join Date: Mar 2016 Location: Kansas City Quote:

Originally Posted by Dylan86 Don’t drive the car hard until at regular operating temp (90*C or higher) is met. Aside from that, the DME will protect against any damage potential, caused by driving the car hard when cold.

Yes, the DME is smart, but you really should hold off on beating on the car until the oil is warm. Based on my data from my $5 Torque app, coolant warms up TWICE as fast as oil on the N55. When you see 90*C (~200*F) on the coolant, your oil is only at around 130-140 degrees. That is not warm enough for oil provide it’s protection. The oil chains change as the oil warms up, giving the oil it’s protective film strength. Put excessive load on the motor when the oil isn’t warm enough could potentially lead to hammering of the rods through oil film and into the bearings (i.e., a spun bearing). The DME isn’t going to save you from this unless knock is occurring at that point. I’ve verified that the DME will allow for full boost at oil temps in the 150*F range. Yikes. People with tuned turbo BMWs should MOST definitely adhere to fully warming the oil before beating on the car as tunes significantly increase power in the low to mid rpm range. A very dangerous situation on cold oil.

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10-03-2017, 07:52 AM # Captain Drives: ’11 X5 50i, ’16 M235xi vert Join Date: Nov 2011 Location: New Jersey Quote:

Originally Posted by XutvJet Oil temp is the most critical thing you should be worried about when it comes to engine longevity. Pay absolutely no attention to coolant temp as coolant warms up much quicker. Oil takes much longer to warm up and needs to be at 180 degrees before romping on it. Per my Torque app, a stone N55 in 60 degree weather takes about 8-10 minutes of driving to get to 180 degrees. On a 40 degree day and a cold motor, you’re looking at nearly 15 minutes. On a 20 degree day, it takes a LONG time. Last year I drove 12 miles, highway and city, and my oil temp didn’t get above 170 degrees on a 20 degree day. If the motor is warm and/or it’s summer, the oil will warm up rapidly. Point is, if you want to go heavy throttle, the oil must be up to temp. Also, heavy throttle also includes going 1/2 throttle at low rpms (sub 2500rpms) and in a tall gear (4th and above). This is called heavy load and spools up the turbo quickly and is hell on the crank and rod bearings. The oil needs to be up to temp to create the most protective film strength. As for when to start driving, start the engine and let it idle for 10 to 30 seconds (the longer idle for really cold days) and then start driving moderately.

could not agree with you more, except I would use 200° instead of 180°. Well said. And it’s just as important to note that part of the issue is that different engine components heat up at different rates. This means that different components may not fit together quite as well as the way your engine was designed until it reaches full operating temperature.

“Warming up” necessary?
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