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How To Turn Off Passenger Airbag On Mercedes C Class?

How To Turn Off Passenger Airbag On Mercedes C Class
The switch for the passenger airbag is in the ‘on’ position by default. You may need to turn the key up a notch in the ignition to disable the airbag. It should be put into the ‘off’ position for disabling.
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Can passenger airbag be turned off?

The passenger airbag can be deactivated if the car is equipped with a switch, Passenger Airbag Cut Off Switch ( PACOS ). The switch for the passenger airbag is located on the passenger end of the instrument panel and is accessible when the passenger door is open. Check that the switch is in the required position. ON – The airbag is activated and all front-facing passengers (children and adults) can sit safely on the passenger seat. OFF – The airbag is deactivated and children in rear-facing child seats can sit safely on the passenger seat.
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Why does my Mercedes say passenger airbag off?

Your passenger airbag will turn off when: The passenger is too light. The weight sensor detects that someone is occupying the seat but is not heavy enough to safely deploy the airbag. The position of the seat or the way the passenger is sitting makes deploying the airbag a safety risk.
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Where is the switch for the passenger airbag?

The switch is in the glove compartment.The passenger airbag deactivation indicator is above the climate control unit. Switching the Passenger Airbag Off WARNING : You must switch the passenger airbag off when using a rearward facing child restraint on the front seat.

Insert the key blade into the switch.

Turn the key to OFF,

When you switch the ignition on, check that the passenger airbag OFF indicator illuminates. If it does not illuminate when you switch the ignition on, this indicates a malfunction. Have your vehicle checked as soon as possible.

Switching the Passenger Airbag On WARNING : You must switch the passenger airbag on following the removal of the child restraint.

Insert the key blade into the switch.

Turn the key to ON,

When you switch the ignition on, check that the passenger airbag ON indicator illuminates. If it does not illuminate when you switch the ignition on, this indicates a malfunction. Have your vehicle checked as soon as possible.

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Can a child ride in the front seat if the airbag is turned off?

Where can a child sit in the car? – Children aged between three and 12, or up to the height of 135cm (4’4″) in the UK and 150cm in Ireland (4’9″), must travel in a child seat placed in either the front or back of a car. Once a child surpasses 135cm (4’4″), they are allowed to travel without a child seat, at which point they’ll legally be required to wear a seatbelt.

Rear-facing child seat – you are required to deactivate all front airbags. Forward-facing child seat – you need to move the passenger seat back as far as possible to maximise the distance between the child and the airbag.

It’s also worth noting that it’s the driver’s responsibility to ensure all children under the age of 14 wear a seat belt.
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Can you manually turn on and off an airbag?

THE AIRBAG IS one of the most important safety features in a vehicle. However, there are times when you should disable the passenger side airbag:

When you’re travelling with a baby in a rear-facing child seat in the front passenger seat. It is illegal to use a rearward-facing child car seat in a passenger seat protected by an airbag. The deployment of an airbag where a rearward-facing baby seat is in place can cause serious injury to the child or even death. When a passenger has an unusual medical condition and a medical professional has deemed it safer for the passenger to ride with the passenger-side airbag deactivated. You can also deactivate the airbag when the seat is empty.

In most cars there will be a useful reminder sticker behind the front passenger visor. Source: Shutterstock/Artic_photo Activating and deactivating the passenger airbag Not every model by every manufacturer has the same system or the same steps to disable the passenger airbag. You need to read the manufacturer’s manual which will give you all the steps that need to be taken. Source: YouTube The PACOS is usually located in the passenger side of the dash board. It may be on the dashboard itself, in the glovebox or on the side of the dash so that you need to open the passenger door to access the switch. The switch will have two positions ‘on’ and ‘off’. Source: Shutterstock You must check that the airbag can actually be deactivated. Not all automobiles offer this option, especially older vehicles. If the car is not equipped with a switch to activate/deactivate the passenger airbag, the airbag will always be activated.

  • Some manufacturers, such as Mazda and Mercedes, have an automatic airbag disabling system.
  • These cars disable the airbag automatically depending on conditions, for example when the passenger seat is empty.
  • If you can’t deactivate the passenger airbag it is recommended that all children travel in the rear seats.

Remember, DO NOT deactivate the front passenger airbag if you’re using a front facing child seat. Note, if the passenger airbag is deactivated, sometimes the electric seatbelt tensioner on the passenger side will also be deactivated. There is a penalty for drivers who place a rearward-facing child car seat in the front where there is an active airbag.
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Why does the passenger airbag turn on?

What does the Passenger Air Bag Off Light mean? If the passenger sensing system detects that there’s no one sitting in the passenger front seat or if several other conditions are met, the Passenger Air Bag Off Light will turn on in the dash. It’s important that you know what this means:

The passenger front air bag is off. The passenger side air bag may be off as well. The air bag will not inflate during an accident.

Tips

If the Passenger Air Bag Off Light is on and there’s an adult-sized passenger in the front seat, it usually means they’re not sitting correctly in the seat. If the passenger adjusts their position and the light does not go out, have the car inspected. Getting the light to go off may require turning the engine off and restarting it.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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How do I turn off passenger airbag warning?

1. Turn Your Ignition on and Off. – This procedure is the same as resetting the airbag light on a Toyota Camry and should be the first thing to do when you encounter the same issue. It entails four simple steps that are easy to follow and requires timing the airbag light.
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At what weight does the passenger airbag turn off?

8. Weight sensors in the front passenger’s seat. The front passenger’s airbag will be turned off if the weight on the seat is approximately 65 lbs (29 kg) or less (the weight of an infant or small child).
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Should the passenger airbag light be on or off?

The airbag warning light should only stay on when there’s a problem with the airbag system in the car. Every time you turn on the car, the computer in the vehicle checks the system. The light comes on for a few seconds and then goes off to show that it’s working.
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Should the passenger airbag be on or off?

Car and passenger safety has progressed enormously on the part of manufacturers since most of us were children; in fact, you may be one of those who ‘survived’ riding in the back of the family station wagon, bouncing along and horsing around without a seatbelt while Mom and Dad cruised along without a worry.

We may be looking toward a future of self-driving cars eventually, but for now, manufacturers continue to study and test safety for cars, making constant strides; in fact, you may find that your new car is equipped with more airbags than you can keep track of, along with safety features that cause the car to beep, ding, flash, and present warnings that have you scrambling for the owner’s manual.

Most of us are also familiar with the cautions printed on the front-seat visors, regarding airbags. These messages are undeniably attention-getting, usually warning in emboldened capitalization of the potential for death or serious injury if children 12 or under were to be riding in the front seat when the airbag deployed.

After viewing this message repeatedly on the visors of your car, it may occur to you that perhaps disabling the airbag is a good idea. While your twelve-year-old may want to sit up front (finally), you may still be concerned about other adults riding in the car who despite their ages, may have small frames or statures.

You may have heard horror stories about drivers and passengers being severely injured after being hit in the face or body with an airbag. These stories are frightening, but such instances are rare—and in most cases the airbag provides an excellent safety mechanism.

  • As the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration points out, tens of thousands of lives have been saved due to air bags since 1987.
  • They are designed to work with seatbelts though, and can prevent massive injuries from occurring—especially to the head and chest area.
  • Injuries can occur from the airbags themselves though if a passenger is sitting too close.

This may be an issue for short or slight drivers, and for some of them, it may indeed be safer to turn the airbag off. The NHTSA only recommends turning off airbags in the following cases:

If it is decided that an adult riding in the passenger seat would be safer with the airbag deactivated—due to a health condition. If a passenger under 13 absolutely must sit in the front seat—usually due to a health condition that must be monitored during the entire drive. In this case, the NHTSA points out that only the passenger airbag should be disabled. A baby must be placed in the front seat in a rear-facing car seat due to lack of other seating.

For those cases, the NHTSA authorizes an on/off switch to be installed in the vehicle, or they may allow a dealer to deactivate the airbag. While some of the bad press and dire warnings in your car may cause you to consider having airbags deactivated, keep in mind that in most cases they are the primary sources of safety during an impact.

Over a million people die in car crashes each year, with thousands injured daily. Make sure all your safety mechanisms are in place, and practice strong defensive driving to avoid being hit by a negligent driver. While this may often be out of our control, it is important to do everything possible to protect ourselves and our loved ones while we are on the road.

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car or motorcycle accident due to the negligence of others, please call Heintz & Becker for a free consultation with one of our personal injury attorneys. We handle all types of Florida personal injury cases, and our law firm has established an impressive record of verdicts and settlements.

If you have been seriously injured, call us now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online, We are here to help! All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

No Fees Or Costs Unless We Get Results Schedule a Free Consultation
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Who should never be seated in front of an airbag?

Air Bags Since their development in the late 1980s, air bags have saved thousands of lives by protecting drivers and passengers during frontal crashes. Front air bags are located in the steering wheel to protect the driver, and in the dashboard of most cars to protect passengers.

Front air bags are not designed to protect vehicle occupants in side and rear impact or rollover collisions. Because air bags (and seat belts) were designed to protect average-sized adult males and NOT children, they can be extremely dangerous to infants or young children seated in front of them. According to research conducted by CHOP, children exposed to air bags during a crash are twice as likely to suffer a serious injury.

Children younger than 13 years are safest when placed in the back seat of a vehicle, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Other air bag safety rules to follow include:

Never place an infant in a rear-facing child safety seat in the front seat with an air bag, In a crash, the air bag comes out of the dashboard with its force directed at the back of the infant’s head if riding in the front passenger seat. The rear seat is the safest place in the car for children younger than 13 years, If you don’t have enough room in the back of your car to safely transport the number of children who need to travel safely, please visit a car seat check in your area where a trained expert will help evaluate your situation. You may need to arrange to use a safer vehicle with enough back seat positions to keep all the kids safe. All passengers ages 13 and older need to wear a lap and shoulder belt when riding in the front seat, Air bags are designed to work with the lap and shoulder belt to protect the occupant in the event of a crash. To keep your older child (age 13 and older) safe in the front seat :

Move the front seat as far back as possible from the dashboardTeach your child not to lean forward to change the radio dial or to insert CDsInsist that your child sit upright against the seatback, with the seat belt snug at all times

Find out what you need to know about air bags when buying a used car. Side torso airbags, designed to protect the pelvis, abdomen and rib cage, usually come out of the seat between the seat occupant and the door. Side air bags designed to protect the head, also known as curtain airbags, come out of the roof above the windows.

  1. While side air bags are more common in the front seats of a vehicle, some newer cars also have side air bags in the rear seats.
  2. Check your car owner’s manual and look for labels on the sides of the seats.
  3. Side air bags can help prevent injuries to adults in side crashes, but may be dangerous to children who are not properly restrained or are leaning against the door.

Although side air bags are smaller than front air bags and inflate with much less force, injury could occur if your child’s head is too close to the air bag. The automotive industry has developed specific test protocols to minimize the risk of injury from side air bags to children seated next to them.
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Can a 7 year old travel in the front of a car?

Licensed Taxis (including private hire vehicles and minicabs) – If a child restraint is not available, children under 3 years must travel in the rear, but may be unrestrained. Children 3 years and over, up to 135cm tall must sit in the rear and use an adult seat belt.
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What age should you turn airbag off?

Children under 12 years should not travel in front seats: Child Seat Safety

Child car seat experts are urging parents not to let children sit in the front passenger seat of a car., Child Seat Safety says children below the age of 12-years-old ‘are the most at risk when the frontal airbag deploys in a crash’. The post also stresses that for anyone putting a rear facing child seat in the front passenger seat, it’s a legal requirement to first deactivate the airbag. Child Seat Safety says: “Young children, especially those below the age of 12-years-old should ideally not be seated in the front passenger seat as they are the most at risk when the frontal airbag deploys in a crash. “To avoid this danger, be mindful where you place children, particularly infants in safety seats and young children. “It is advisable for children to be placed in the back seat and on appropriate child safety seats secured with a seat belt. “You should always check and follow specific advice from your vehicle manufacturer.” ‘Safer restrained in the rear seats’ Official Government advice says that ‘generally, children are safer restrained in the rear seats’ of vehicles. The DfT’s adds: “In deciding where children should travel in your car you should always follow the vehicle and child restraint manufacturer’s advice. “If you do carry children facing forward in the front seat, they should always be properly restrained and the seat should be latched as far back as possible.” Julie Dagnall, director of Child Seat Safety and a Road Safety GB specialist with regards to child car seats, : “It is essential to check the vehicle handbook for instructions before placing any child seat in the front passenger seat.

“It’s a legal requirement for an airbag to be deactivated if a rear facing car seat is being used. UK Road Traffic collision data identifies that it’s safer to sit in the rear seats and therefore wherever possible children should use these.” : Children under 12 years should not travel in front seats: Child Seat Safety
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Can you accidentally trigger an airbag?

Air bags have made an impact in reducing fatalities in frontal crashes.When air bags work properly, they can be one of a motor vehicle’s most important safety features. A frontal air bag can not only protect an occupant from hitting the steering wheel or dash, it can also protect an occupant by keeping her in place.

Side air bags can protect a passenger’s head and chest, especially in side impact accidents. Rollover air bags are designed to stay inflated for a while after impact to assist in keeping a vehicle passenger inside the car in a rollover. When air bags do not work properly, they can be responsible for serious injuries or even death.

Defective air bag cases usually fall into one of the following types:

Air bags may not deploy. Air bags are not designed to deploy in every accident, but when crash forces are high enough, it is important for air bags to inflate. When a frontal or side air bag does not deploy in a crash, an occupant can suffer serious injuries, whether wearing a seat belt or not. Air bags may accidentally deploy. Sometimes an air bag will deploy when a vehicle hits a curb or even a pothole. This accidental or inadvertent deployment can not only directly cause injury to an occupant, it can cause the driver to lose control of the vehicle and have a serious collision. Air bags may be too aggressive when they deploy. If an occupant is struck by an air bag before it completely inflates, the passenger can be injured, blinded or even killed. Lack of side air bags. Side air bags and rollover air bags are not required by the federal government. Therefore, manufacturers have decided not to include them on certain models. Not having side air bags or rollover air bags is a cost-cutting measure which can cause severe consequences in an accident. Air bags may deploy late. When an air bag which deploys late, an occupant can suffer greater injuries than would have been incurred had the air bag not deployed at all. A bent steering wheel or occupant contact marks on the wheel or on the dash suggest late deployment.

Common air bag injuries include chemical and friction burns, hearing damage, traumatic head and neck injuries, and broken bones. Defective air bags can be especially dangerous for children and smaller adults. Small individuals are more likely to be injured by the force of a defective air bag.

You may have a defective air bag case if any of these factors apply: – The air bag deployed late; – The air bag failed to deploy, while there was damage to the front bumper; – The airbag deployed in a collision under 10 miles an hour; – The occupant is severely injured because of the air bag deployment.

When death or a debilitating injury results from a motor vehicle accident, the lawyers of Wolff Ardis, P.C. can assist you in investigating whether the injuries were caused by a defective or poorly designed air bag and can help you pursue your claim. If you or a loved one has been injured in an accident in which an air bag did not perform properly, contact the experienced lawyers of Wolff Ardis, P.C.
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Are passenger airbags optional?

Front airbags – Since the 1999 model year, the federal government has required automakers to install driver and passenger airbags for frontal impact protection in all cars, light trucks and vans. Front airbags are designed to inflate in moderate to severe frontal crashes to prevent a person’s head and chest from contacting hard structures in the vehicle.

They offer the most protection when occupants are wearing safety belts and sitting properly in the seat but are designed to provide protection for all occupants. Newer airbags have a safety belt sensor and use an algorithm to decide whether to deploy the bag in a given crash, depending on whether people are using safety belts.

Typically, a front airbag will deploy for unbelted occupants when the crash is the equivalent of an impact into a rigid wall at 10-12 mph. Most airbags will deploy at a higher threshold — about 16 mph — for belted occupants because the belts alone are likely to provide adequate protection up to these moderate speeds.

Front airbags may deploy to help protect occupants in side impacts if there is sufficient forward movement during the crash. The driver airbag is located in the steering wheel. The passenger airbag is located in the dashboard. Some manufacturers provide supplemental knee airbags, mounted lower. Knee airbags are intended to distribute impact forces to reduce leg injuries.

They may also help reduce forces on an occupant’s chest and abdomen by controlling movement of the occupant’s lower body.
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Should passenger airbag be on or off?

Car and passenger safety has progressed enormously on the part of manufacturers since most of us were children; in fact, you may be one of those who ‘survived’ riding in the back of the family station wagon, bouncing along and horsing around without a seatbelt while Mom and Dad cruised along without a worry.

We may be looking toward a future of self-driving cars eventually, but for now, manufacturers continue to study and test safety for cars, making constant strides; in fact, you may find that your new car is equipped with more airbags than you can keep track of, along with safety features that cause the car to beep, ding, flash, and present warnings that have you scrambling for the owner’s manual.

Most of us are also familiar with the cautions printed on the front-seat visors, regarding airbags. These messages are undeniably attention-getting, usually warning in emboldened capitalization of the potential for death or serious injury if children 12 or under were to be riding in the front seat when the airbag deployed.

  1. After viewing this message repeatedly on the visors of your car, it may occur to you that perhaps disabling the airbag is a good idea.
  2. While your twelve-year-old may want to sit up front (finally), you may still be concerned about other adults riding in the car who despite their ages, may have small frames or statures.
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You may have heard horror stories about drivers and passengers being severely injured after being hit in the face or body with an airbag. These stories are frightening, but such instances are rare—and in most cases the airbag provides an excellent safety mechanism.

  1. As the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration points out, tens of thousands of lives have been saved due to air bags since 1987.
  2. They are designed to work with seatbelts though, and can prevent massive injuries from occurring—especially to the head and chest area.
  3. Injuries can occur from the airbags themselves though if a passenger is sitting too close.

This may be an issue for short or slight drivers, and for some of them, it may indeed be safer to turn the airbag off. The NHTSA only recommends turning off airbags in the following cases:

If it is decided that an adult riding in the passenger seat would be safer with the airbag deactivated—due to a health condition. If a passenger under 13 absolutely must sit in the front seat—usually due to a health condition that must be monitored during the entire drive. In this case, the NHTSA points out that only the passenger airbag should be disabled. A baby must be placed in the front seat in a rear-facing car seat due to lack of other seating.

For those cases, the NHTSA authorizes an on/off switch to be installed in the vehicle, or they may allow a dealer to deactivate the airbag. While some of the bad press and dire warnings in your car may cause you to consider having airbags deactivated, keep in mind that in most cases they are the primary sources of safety during an impact.

  1. Over a million people die in car crashes each year, with thousands injured daily.
  2. Make sure all your safety mechanisms are in place, and practice strong defensive driving to avoid being hit by a negligent driver.
  3. While this may often be out of our control, it is important to do everything possible to protect ourselves and our loved ones while we are on the road.

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car or motorcycle accident due to the negligence of others, please call Heintz & Becker for a free consultation with one of our personal injury attorneys. We handle all types of Florida personal injury cases, and our law firm has established an impressive record of verdicts and settlements.

If you have been seriously injured, call us now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online, We are here to help! All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

No Fees Or Costs Unless We Get Results Schedule a Free Consultation
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What is a good reason for disabling a car’s airbags?

Road Rules: Disabling the airbag? Posted Wednesday, September 9, 2020 3:04 pm By Doug Dahl Question: I have been concerned about this for years: I am just 5 feet tall and weigh 110 pounds. When driving I need the seat moved forward quite a bit to reach the pedals.

  1. Can I, or should I, disconnect the airbag? But then my husband, on the rare times he uses my car, would be at risk.
  2. Waiting for your wise advice.
  3. Thank you.
  4. Answer: You’ve probably seen the letters “SRS” embossed on the steering wheel and in front of the passenger seat on the dashboard.
  5. In a round-about way, those three letters explain why you probably don’t need to be concerned about injury from your airbag.

Is it possible to get injured from an airbag? Yes, but probably not because you’re short. The airbag was invented in 1919 by a couple of dentists who were trying to prevent jaw fractures. They both served at a hospital during World War I treating war victims with severe jaw injuries.

Realizing that many of these injuries were caused by vehicle crashes (both planes and road-traveling vehicles), they sought a solution to preventing the injuries. Given the technology limitations of 1919, the dentists’ airbag design was nothing like what we have now. Airbag innovation progressed in the 1950s, ’60s and early ’70s, Ford and General Motors deployed them on a limited basis.

By the late ’70s both had abandoned the idea, thinking it wasn’t viable. Turns out they were wrong. In the mid ’80s, airbags made a return in a few cars and by 1998 they were mandatory in all cars. Back to those three letters: “SRS” stands for Supplemental Restraint System.

  • As you might guess from the name, airbags are not intended to be your primary safety device in a crash; that’s your seatbelt.
  • It’s true that airbags have caused some fatalities.
  • However, over 80 percent of those deaths involved a vehicle occupant who was unbelted or improperly belted.
  • Ninety percent of those fatalities occurred in vehicles manufactured before 1998.

That’s when federal rules reduced the power in airbags). Airbags are designed to work in harmony with a seatbelt to reduce injuries that your seatbelt can’t prevent, not as a stand-alone safety feature. Most airbag injuries and fatalities that involve a driver too close to the airbag come not from sitting too close, but from not wearing a seatbelt and then moving too close during the crash.

If you always wear your seatbelt, the risk from your airbag is minuscule compared to the advantages it offers in a crash. In fact, airbags save thousands of lives every year and reduce serious injuries that seatbelts alone can’t prevent. However, the law does allow for a few scenarios where you would be allowed to disable an airbag, and one is related to your seating position.

There is such a thing as too close, and it might be closer than you were expecting. The first 2 to 3 inches of airbag deployment are the “risk zone.” Beyond that, risk of injury diminishes rapidly. The recommended minimum distance between the steering wheel and the driver in an airbag-equipped car is 10 inches.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) figures that in most vehicles a driver who is 4’6″ or taller should be able to position the driver’s seat to get 10 inches between their chest and the steering wheel. The other driver exception is a medical condition that “makes the potential harm from the driver air bag greater than allowing the driver, even if belted, to hit the steering wheel, dashboard, or windshield in a crash.” I don’t know what medical condition fits those parameters, but it’s an option for anyone whose doctor thinks they need it.

On the passenger side, an airbag can be disabled if transporting an infant or child and the back seat isn’t an option (usually because there is no back seat, like in a pickup or two-seater sports car). The back seat, if there is one, is always the safer place for kids to ride, but putting an infant in a rear-facing car seat in the front seat of an airbag equipped car is extra-disastrous in a crash.
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At what weight does the passenger airbag turn off?

8. Weight sensors in the front passenger’s seat. The front passenger’s airbag will be turned off if the weight on the seat is approximately 65 lbs (29 kg) or less (the weight of an infant or small child).
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