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What Does Tom Ford Oud Wood Smell Like?

What Does Tom Ford Oud Wood Smell Like
One might argue that Tom Ford ushered in the new dawn of oud fragrances — whether or not anyone wanted it — when he launched M7 for YSL fragrances in 2002. And, judging by the latter’s market bomb, no-one did want it. M7 was not just a trail-blazer and the first of its kind; it was also too original, unique, bold and, it seems, shocking for a world dominated by the freshness of (the revolting) Acqua di Gio. When Tom Ford left YSL and began his own fashion line, it’s hardly surprising that he tried to remedy what may have been his first official failure. He returned to the oud well and launched Private Blend Oud Wood in 2007. Only, this time, he tried to make the oud (or agarwood) palatable, approachable and mild for the mainstream masses.

(To read more about agarwood, you can turn to the Glossary, or to my post on the oud trend linked up above.) And, he succeeded. Oud Wood is lovely and infinitely easy to wear, especially by the standards of many other agarwood fragrances in the market today. The reason is that — at the end of the day — Oud Wood is not a very oud fragrance at all.

This is no nuclear Montale — a niche perfume house that has around 27 oud fragrances, all of which radiate post-apocalyptic intensity. And it’s not M7 either, a much sweeter, more potent, hard-core treatment of the subject. Though I’ve only tried the reformulated version of M7, I have to admit, I far preferred it to Tom Ford’s second foray into agarwood.

Oud Wood is a unisex perfume which Fragrantica categorizes as “Oriental Spicy.” On his website, Tom Ford describes it as follows: Exotic Rose Wood and Cardamom, blended with exuberant Chinese Pepper, envelop the wearer in warmth. Eventually, the center exposes a smokey blend of rare Oud Wood, Sandalwood and Vetiver.

Finally, the creamy scents of Tonka Bean, Vanilla and Amber are revealed. The full set of notes according to Now Smell This (NST) are: rosewood, cardamom, Chinese pepper, oud, sandalwood, vetiver, tonka bean, vanilla and amber. Oud Wood opens softly. Extremely softly for a Tom Ford fragrance, if I might add.

  • It may be the softest opening I’ve ever experienced for one of his perfumes — Private Blend or regular collection! The very first impression is of rose and sweet, nutty cardamom.
  • It’s lovely.
  • There is also Szechuan pepper, earthy vetiver, and hints of rich vanilla as if from a freshly cut Madagascar bean.

Following in their footsteps is the faintly medicinal tones of oud. There is no huge bite to the oud, and I don’t think it’s mutedness is due to the fact that it is covered by a veil of spice and sweetness. Even putting aside the unique nature of Montale’s fragrances, the oud here is different to others that I have smelled.

For example, the By Kilian oud fragrances in the Arabian Nights collection range from cold, stony oud in Pure Oud to almost no oud at all in Amber Oud, Tom Ford’s Oud Wood may be closest to Rose Oud with its rose and soft agarwood, but there is still a difference that is hard to explain. It’s as if the oud has been hidden here such that it’s merely providing small cameo performances here or there.

It’s not the star, but it’s also not one of the main supporting actors either. Thirty minutes in, it remains a fragrance that is predominantly rose, cardamom and oud. The latter has become slightly more prominent now with a heavier element of camphor. Its chilly undertones provide a balance to the rose notes that are frequently present in oud fragrances.

  • And the combination of oud with the nutty, aromatic, sweetness of cardamom is absolutely gorgeous.
  • But, despite that, Oud Wood is still much less sweet, and much dryer, than the (reformulated) version of M7.
  • And, frankly, I think I would have preferred a little more sweetness.
  • It’s around this time that there is an unexpected twist: I’m convinced I smell mocha! Something in the interplay of the nutty, sweet cardamom with the agarwood and the earthy rootiness of the vetiver has led to a strong impression of mocha ice cream.

I’m an enormous fan of the latter, so I’m very happy (though somewhat perplexed). Yet, despite that surprise, Oud Wood isn’t a particularly complex or complicated fragrance. It doesn’t morph or fundamentally change in a huge way, but perhaps that’s why it’s such an easy fragrance to wear.

  • About two hours in, the vetiver starts to truly emerge and it remains prominent for the length of the perfume’s development.
  • Oud Wood is now primarily a vetiver, cardamom and (vaguely) oud fragrance with the rose becoming increasingly fainter.
  • At the three-hour mark, sandalwood makes its appearance, pushing the rose completely off the stage and blending with the vanilla, cardamom and the earthy vetiver in a truly lovely manner.

At times, it seems as though Oud Wood is mainly a vanilla vetiver with hints of oud and spice. At other times, it’s mostly sandalwood with vetiver. The perfume fluctuates and undulates, showing just how well-blended it is. “The Seine at Le Grande Jatte” by George Seurat. Four hours in, the perfume is extremely close to the skin and predominantly sandalwood with vetiver. The latter is increasingly sweet, fresh and bright green, reminding me of the aromatic fragrancy of lemongrass more than anything earthy or dark.

It’s lovely, especially when combined with the spiced creaminess of the sandalwood. There are faint traces of vanilla and tonka, and the oud occasionally pops up like a fleeting Jack in the Box, but those are all minor things. The dry-down is mostly just sandalwood and vetiver. I’m truly taken aback by the moderate sillage and brevity of the perfume.

The projection is surprisingly mild and tame for a Tom Ford fragrance. Even more surprising, it has an unusually shortest duration: around 5.5 hours on my skin. I know I have peculiar skin, but I’m not alone in this one. From the review on NST to comments on Fragrantica, a large number of people have noted the average (or, for a Tom Ford, extremely below-average ) projection, softness and mildness of the fragrance.

  1. On Fragrantica, there are repeated comments about how Oud Wood simply doesn’t last.
  2. It’s enough to make one convinced that Tom Ford intentionally went to the exact opposite extreme of every single thing he did with M7.) My greater difficulty, and one which has made this review a struggle to write, is that Oud Wood is hard to get extremely excited about.

Please don’t mistake me, it’s an absolutely lovely fragrance and, if I had a full bottle, I would wear it. In fact, I would probably wear it frequently! It’s versatile, easy, uncomplicated, rich-smelling and that sandalwood dry-down is simply delicious.

Oud Wood may even be my second favorite Tom Ford Private Blend fragrance. (I shall have to ponder that one.) But it’s simply not remarkable. It’s hard to muster up enormous excitement for what is — by today’s standards in particular — a very average oud. I’m not criticizing it for that, especially as “average” was the express goal! Tom Ford already did “remarkable,” and fell on his tush.

Personally, I’m still obsessed with smelling un-reformulated, original M7 but, since both it and the reformulated version have been discontinued, I’m out of luck for the moment. (It sometimes appears on eBay, so there is always hope.) For those of you who have been unsuccessful with agarwood thus far but who really want to find an accessible oud to try, Tom Ford’s Oud Wood should be right up your alley.

  1. It’s really just a spiced, vanilla, vetiver, woody fragrance that simply happens to have some oud in it.
  2. It’s neither particularly sweet nor masculine.
  3. But it’s infinitely wearable, far from potent, very approachable, and utterly delicious at times.
  4. For those of you who have been previously traumatized by the bullying or “frat boy” aspects of some Tom Fords, you too may have better luck with this one.

But if you’ve had greater exposure to the plethora of ouds on the market or are looking for a true agarwood fragrance, then this may be too tame for you.
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When should I wear Tom Ford Oud Wood?

Where Should You Wear It? – You can wear Ford’s oud cologne anywhere, but because of its sensual nature, you may want to avoid wearing it to the office and stick to more traditional cologne in those settings. The best times and places to wear Tom Ford Oud Wood Intense are evenings out.
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Is Tom Ford Oud Wood a men’s fragrance?

Tom Ford Oud Wood is a very refreshing scent in a deep earthy way that can be used by any gender, and should be considered a staple for any elegant persona.
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What is the most popular Tom Ford scent?

Tom Ford perfume collection – Tom Ford’s fragrance line is divided into two distinctive collections. The more creative and expensive Private Blend and more affordable, yet still original Signature Collection, In this ultimate guide about Tom Ford perfumes, I’ll also cover the sub-collections within those two lines so as to make it easier to choose which Tom Ford fragrance path you wish to tread on.

One thing’s for sure, the price range varies and depending on which fragrance line you choose, the price goes from anywhere from 60$ to more than 900$, Does it mean that if something is expensive it’s better? Not always, and my number one choice comes from the Signature line. Please keep in mind that you can wear whatever you want.

No matter what it says on the perfume sticker. To put it plain and simple, that’s just marketing. Man or woman, you can wear each and every fragrance from this list. I don’t think any other fragrance brand has come so close with their scents being unisex, as Tom Ford did.

  • Oud Wood
  • Noir de Noir
  • Tobacco Vanille
  • Tuscan Leather
  • Amber Absolute
  • Velvet Gardenia
  • Black Violet
  • Purple Patchouli
  • Bois Rouge
  • Moss Breches
  • Neroli Portofino
  • Japan Noir

This unisex range is meant to be layered one with another and thus, creating your own distinguish scent profile. Highly-priced and targeted to perfume connoisseurs and to all who want to experience true niche perfumery, The Private Blend will amaze you and open your eyes to what can be achieved in modern perfumery.

  • Praised by fragrance lovers, actors, musicians, and people in all other sorts of industries, Private Blend fragrances just work.
  • High-quality ingredients, exclusive, sophisticated, open-minded ideas blended into fragrances, superb complexity, and much more.
  • There is something for everyone here.
  • What’s even better, you can find this range in almost any high range fragrance department store.

It is all in the name of the fragrance. Each fragrance begins with the extract from a single note such as leather and vanilla. If we want to go even further, Oud Wood, Tuscan Leather, and Tobacco Vanille are widely regarded as the best fragrances ever released.

  1. THE SIGNATURE COLLECTION Fragrances from the Signature Collection bring Tom Ford luxury to a wider mainstream audience and are more approachable in some cases.
  2. This doesn’t mean that these fragrances are of lower quality or not worth seeking out, but sit in the designer price range to compete with the other big fragrance brands such as Dior and Hermes,

The compositions are tight, blended to perfection, and punch way above the price point. I recommend starting with this collection if you are new to the brand to get the gist and idea of where to go next. The first-ever released fragrance from Tom Ford was Black Orchid in 2006 and comes from the Signature line.

  1. Bitter Peach
  2. Lost Cherry
  3. Rose Prick
  4. F*cking Faboulos

No, you are not imagining it. It is a play on words. NOIR In the Signature line, the Noir sub-collection has four different seductive fragrances: Noir Eau de Toilette, Noir, Eau de Parfum, Noir Extreme for Men and Women, and Noir Anthracite. Suitable for nightwear, glamorous black-tie events, and business wear.

EDT and EDP are dark, woody, and floral fragrances, while both Noir Extreme’s are sweet and spicy scents. Anthracite is smokier with exotic characters. OUD Spicy and woody Oud Wood is Tom Ford’s most popular fragrance and the scent with its own line within the Private Blend. Other three fragrances that make the line are Oud Minerale with an aquatic take on the woody formula, and Tobacco Oud, the most daring of the three, focusing on the dark tobacco note and oud.

Oud Fleur takes a different approach with the inclusion of florals and focusing on the rose note. PORTOFINO Purely designed as the option for summer usage, vacations, and those good times when you want to be reminded of the most relaxed part of the year.
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Why is oud wood so popular?

A Scent Unlike Any Other – One of the major reasons for its popularity is that the scent of oud is one unlike any other. Though it varies from its precise point of origin as well as its age, it is noted for being pungent, containing a musky, animalic quality that has made its way into many perfumeries.
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Is oud an attractive smell?

There’s no doubt about it: oudh divides opinion. It’s one of those ‘Marmite’ perfumery ingredients, which people either swoon over or clutch their pearls and scream while avoiding at all costs. But if you think you hate oudh – or any one of the other fragrant materials we’ll be discussing over the coming weeks – get ready to have your perfume preconceptions challenged, and allow yourself to experience some of the newer scents using it as more of a background note.

Think of it in the same way you’d use a seasoning, like salt, in cooking. You wouldn’t want the whole dish to be dominated by it, but a judicious sprinkle can utterly alter the way the other ingredients behave and react with one another. So, let’s go back to basics before we plunge in to the perfumes you should sniff out.

What is oudh? When we blithely say ‘oudh’, we are actually referring to agarwood – the resinous heart-wood from fast-growing evergreen trees – usually the Aquilaria tree. The agarwood is a result of a reaction to a fungal attack, which turns this usually pale and light wood into a dark, resinous wood with a distinct fragrance – a process that can take hundreds of years. From that ‘rotten’ wood, an oil is produced, tapped from the tree like maple syrup, and then blended into perfume. The aroma of ‘natural’ oudh is distinctively irresistible and attractive with bitter sweet and woody nuances: seriously earthy and, in small quantities, supremely sexy.

Depending on the type of oudh, how long it’s been aged and the quantity used, it can be smooth as velvet, smell like fresh hay drying in sunshine or like a particularly busy barnyard on a rather ripe summer’s day. Just like anything else used in a fragrance, it depends entirely on the expertise of the perfumer, how much they are using, and in conjunction with which other ingredients.

A key ingredient in old and new Arabic perfumery, renowned for centuries as an element within high-quality incense in Arabic, Japanese and Indian cultures, oudh has gone from a ‘trend’ ingredient we saw emerging a few years ago on our scented shores, to now having definitively crossed over to the west as something you can find everywhere – even in fabric conditioners and deodorants. Collection of agarwood from natural forests is now illegal under CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endanged Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), but some is now beginning to be plantation grown in Vietnam. As an alternative, many perfumers have turned to synthetic oudh, although highly trained noses will tell you it can smell less nuanced, still woody and leathery, but without the warm, balsamic qualities. Here we travel to the land of Assam via the richly resonant aromas of the East. Cinnamon leaf oil and nutmeg make for a lively opening with the heart notes giving way to the wonderfully exotic citrus-fresh elemi oil so prized by perfumers. Black tea accord marks our fragrant journey with its smoky tendrils slowly opening to the deeper base and that sweet, wet earthiness and smooth wood played out with notes of oudh and vetiver. This feels like an homage to the very origins of perfume – ‘per-fumum’ meaning ‘through smoke’ – this exploration of incense, made exclusively for Harrods, melding the gentle fruity notes of fresh Turkish rose petals plucked from a misty, dew-specked garden, with a fragrant drift of exotic spices.

There’s a myticism, somehow, to wearing this. A pure parfum, it lingers beguilingly on the skin for many hours, waves of wamth unfurling, tendrills of smoky woodiness curling around you as you move – your own invisible velvet cloak to swirl, joyously, all day. Just as perfect as night falls, the scent swoons duskily onto the skin like a sunset kissing the earth.

Sumptuous. Atelier Cologne Rose Smoke £325 for 100ml pure parfum Buy it at Harrods We automatically began smacking our lips at this, even before we’d sprayed. And oh, once you do, it’s every bit as delicious as you’d hope – if it did come in a jar we’d want to spread buttered crumpets with it, and most definitely smother ourselves from neck to ankles.

Probably best it’s bottled, then. With a truly honeyed note that deepens as the sustainably-sourced oudh kicks in, this is intensely nuzzle-able, and there’s nothing whatever to frighten the horses. A gourmand-esque take on oudh, think soft rose and creamy sandalwood rippled with dark seams of oudh, amber and vanilla-specked deliciousness.

Floris Honey Oud £160 for 100ml eau de parfum Buy it at Floris Unashamedly salacious, the Turkish and Bulgarian roses entwine the heart, bereft of thorns they mingle with the gently powdered violet – a sheer dusting bestowed from a swan’s-down puff – and the most opulently creamy vanilla base you’re likely to encounter. Named after a small Turkish village on the banks of the river Euphrates and famed for its intensely dusky roses that bloom so deeply crimson they appear to be black, Halfeti is certainly not your ‘blushing English rose’. A balmy breeze of bergamot wafts forth saffron’s warmth, followed by a sizzle of spices perfectly blended with a bouquet of jasmine, rose, lavender and lily of the valley.
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Can you wear oud wood everyday?

Our Oud Perfume for Men – what to expect – This is a fragrance that delivers maximum impact, right from the first spray. Initially, you’ll detect the strong, smooth scent of rosewood and sandalwood, with a hint of tonka bean to add subtlety and interest.

After a few more minutes, you’ll notice that the fragrance has shifted in personality. Now, you’ll pick up on the evocative, Middle-Eastern notes of oud oil, complemented by the amber and vetiver. As the day goes on, the ingredients of our Oud fragrance blend, producing an aroma that’s heady and immediately recognisable.

This is definitely a sensual after-hours eau de parfum, and is likely to be appreciated by your partner! When should you wear it? Any fragrances that are inspired by Coloni Intensa Oud and Oud Wood are likely to be intense and potent. As such, they’re not designed for daily wear (unless you want to command attention in the boardroom).
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Is oud a male or female perfume?

It’s rich, animalic and combined with slightly spicy or floral notes, will make the ultimate winter fragrance. It’s not just for men, either. Many women love to wear the men’s oud scents so much so, that they might be classed as unisex.
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Can you wear oud wood in the summer?

TOM FORD Oud Wood Intense – Oud might not be an obvious choice for summer, but if you prefer your fragrances on the rich, full-bodied side, you can’t do much better than TOM FORD’s Oud Wood Intense. The brand describes this one as “UNRESTRAINED” in capital letters. A heady trip of smoky oud and castoreum tempered by a fresh hit of juniper, this is potently masculine yet retains a sense of sophistication. 19-69, as you may have guessed from the name, makes fragrances that conjure up the charm and headiness of the 1960s. This particular blend, named Purple Haze, is a light yet intoxicating mix of Indian balsam and geranium with a touch of white musk and black pepper.
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Can I wear Tom Ford oud wood in summer?

Tom Ford’s Oud Wood Intense: The Perfect Summer Fragrance – Tom Ford’s Oud Wood Intense will be a top seller if you want a scent that is both sophisticated and fresh this summer. If you want to project a sense of sophistication and class, it’s a great outfit for you.
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What is Tom Ford’s favorite fragrance?

‘Tobacco Vanille is opulent, warm, and iconic,’ Tom Ford says of this warm and sultry scent.
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What is the best selling scent of all time?

Everything’s coming up roses for the fragrance category. After years of decline, sales of scent are on the rise again, providing pandemic-weary consumers a much-needed shot of luxury and indulgence. In the U.S, the category registered double-digit growth against both 2020 and 2019, according to The NPD Group, with sales of perfumes, colognes and other juices up 61 percent.

  1. What better time than to ask the people who know fragrance best — beauty industry insiders — to vote on the top 100 fragrances of all time.
  2. In early January, we sent out more than 300 ballots to industry insiders, comprised of founders, marketers, retailers, influencers, editors, perfumers, analysts and C-suite types, then tabulated their responses.

(The full list of those willing to be identified as electors is below, although, of course, what they voted on is for their eyes only.) The parameters were broad. Voters could single out their top 10 to 20 fragrances, and were asked to use the following parameters when making their choice: originality of concept; olfactive originality; retail performance; marketing innovation; quality of ingredients, and packaging and bottle design.

The resulting list of 100 scents (culled from more than 480 nominated) is a fascinating microcosm of the past, present and future of fragrance, with myriad firsts, from the first celebrity fragrance ( Chanel No.5, of course) to the first with psychoactive benefits, the THC-containing The Herbalist by Heretic,

Interestingly, on the women’s side, there is a closer correspondence between bestsellers and those voted on to the list: seven of the top 10 selling women’s fragrances in the U.S. made it. But only two of the top-selling men’s scents made the final 100.

Based on the votes received, we have ranked the top 20 fragrances. The remaining 80 are listed alphabetically. Here, the greatest 100 fragrances of all time, as voted on by the beauty industry. The Top 20 1. Chanel No.5 Launched: 1921 Perfumer: Ernest Beaux Olfactive Family: Floral aldehydic “The gold standard,” one voter said.

“The beginning of everything we think of in modern fragrance,” said another, of the bestselling scent of all time, which contains 1,000 jasmine flowers in every 30-ml. flacon. “It not only endures, it triumphs.” Chanel No.5 2. Le Labo Santal 33 Launched: 2011 Perfumer: Frank Voelkl Olfactive Family: Woody aromatic What started as a candle has become one of the most “cultish fragrances of all time,” said a voter. “The first big iconic niche fragrance,” said another. “It helped make niche relevant and was the fragrance for all Millennial opinion leaders for over 10 years.” Le Labo Santal 33 Courtesy Photo 3. Thierry Mugler Angel Launched: 1992 Perfumer: Olivier Cresp Olfactive Family: Gourmand “A key milestone in perfumery’s modern history,” wrote one voter, echoing the sentiments of many, of the scent that created the gourmand category. Its popularity is undiminished: in 2021, 27 units were sold every hour. Thierry Mugler Angel Courtesy Photo 4. Frédéric Malle Portrait of a Lady Launched: 2010 Perfumer: Dominique Ropion Olfactive Family: “Mysterious elegance” Malle made two finalist attempts of the scents that would become Portrait of a Lady. He perfumed his wife with one of the two and asked her to go for a walk. Frederic Malle Portrait of a Lady Courtesy Photo 5. Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Launched: 2001 Perfumer: Jacques Polge Olfactive Family: Amber fresh Chanel tasked Polge with creating a scent Coco Chanel herself would wear. Today, it’s the fourth-bestselling prestige fragrance in America, and helped “relaunch Chanel as a top fragrance player and set a new olfactive trend,” one voter said. Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Courtesy Photo 6. Dolce & Gabbana Light Blue Launched: 2001 Perfumer: Olivier Cresp Olfactive Family: Citrus woody Voters credit this Sicilian-inspired scent that took Cresp two years to develop with starting a new olfactive trend, noting its “uniqueness” in the market. “Uses few but powerful molecules and very few naturals to create a natural sensation,” wrote one. Dolce & Gabbana Light Blue Courtesy Photo 7. Dior Eau Sauvage Launched: 1966 Perfumer: Edmond Roudnitska Olfactive Family: Aromatic citrus “The first time hedione was used, which was eventually to be used in almost every fragrance,” wrote a voter, of the newly synthesized molecule called methyl dihydrojasmonate that was a scientific breakthrough in perfumery. Dior Eau Sauvage Courtesy Photo 8. Tom Ford Black Orchid Launched: 2006 Perfumer: Pierre Negrin and David Apel, Givaudan Olfactive Family: Amber floral “The best perfume to be shared by both genders,” wrote a voter. “It wasn’t the first — CK One was — but it is the best.” Tom Ford Black Orchid Courtesy Photo 9. Giorgio Armani Acqua di Giò Launched: 1996 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas, Annick Menardo, Annie Buzantian, Jacques Cavallier-Belletrud Olfactive Family: Citrus The bestselling men’s fragrance since its launch has sold more than 25 million units since launch and “personifies the long-lasting, clean, fresh, watery feeling,” a voter said. Acqua di Gio Courtesy Photo 10. Calvin Klein CK One Launched: 1994 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas, Harry Fremont Olfactive Family: Citrus aromatic “Genderless before its time,” said a respondent, “and responsible for a transition from heavier ’80s scents into the sheerer, easier scents of the 90s.” CK One was also the first fragrance to be sold in Tower Records, a disruptive distribution strategy consistent with the changing attitudes around consumer accessibility. Calvin Klein CK One Courtesy Photo 11. Guerlain Shalimar Launched: 1925 Perfumer: Jacques Guerlain Olfactive Family: Amber The first amber fragrance (once called “Orientals”), Shalimar was called a “timeless perfume, nearly perfect in construction,” by a voter. “Represents sensuality in the olfaction and concept,” another said. Guerlain Shalimar Courtesy Photo 12. Issey Miyake L’Eau d’Issey Launched: 1992 Perfumer: Jacques Cavallier Olfactive Family: Aquatic “The grandparent of the watery category and the first to use transparency as a concept,” said a voter of L’Eau, whose bottle was inspired by an evening in Paris when Miyake saw the moon shining above the Eiffel Tower. Issey Miyake L’Eau d’Issey Courtesy Photo 13. YSL Opium Launched: 1977 Perfumer: Jean Amic, Jean-Louis Sieuzac and Raymond Chaillan Olfactive Family: Amber Scandal only served to fuel desire: Testers were stolen, posters were ripped down and stores sold out in a matter of hours on the launch date. YSL Opium Courtesy Photo 14. Dior J’Adore Launched: 1999 Perfumer: Calice Becker Olfactive Family: Floral bouquet “Still a benchmark in the floral category,” and the “first global blockbuster,” J’Adore is still a top five women’s seller in the U.S. today, per NPD. Dior J’Adore Courtesy Photo 15. Estée Lauder Youth Dew Launched: 1953 Perfumer: Josephine Catapano Olfactive Family: Amber/spicy In the early ’50s, Estée Lauder wondered why women relied on men to buy them perfume. She created Youth Dew as a bath oil first to make women comfortable with the idea of purchasing it for themselves. Youth Dew Courtesy Photo 16. Clinique Aromatics Elixir Launched: 1971 Perfumer: Bernard Chant Olfactive Family: Chypre floral In development for more than two years and 700 ingredients to develop. The first scent to be positioned as an “elixir,” said to have special effects on the body and mind. Clinique Aromatics Elixir Courtesy Photo 17. Maison Francis Kurkdjian Bacarrat Rouge Launched: 2015 Perfumer: Francis Kurkdjian Olfactive Family: Amber floral First created in 2015 and sold in only 250 limited edition crystal bottles to celebrate Baccarat’s 250th anniversary, today it’s a top 10 seller in the U.S. and a social media sensation, to boot. Maison Francis Kurkdjian Baccarat Rouge 540 Courtesy Photo 18. Frédéric Malle Carnal Flower Launched: 2005 Perfumer: Dominique Ropion Olfactive Family: Vegetal addiction At the time of its creation, Malle brought a bouquet of tuberoses everyday to Dominique Ropion to help him identify the flower, the main ingredient of the perfume. Frederic Malle Carnal Flower Courtesy Photo 19. Narciso Rodriguez for Her Launched: 2003 Perfumer: Christine Nagel and Francis Kurkdjian Olfactive Family: Floral musk “The best-looking bottle since Chanel No.5” with a scent that helped update the “once old-fashioned chypre category,” For Her was inspired by the Egyptian Musk Oil Rodriguez wore in high school. Narciso Rodriguez For Her Courtesy Photo 20. Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb Launched: 2005 Perfumer: Olivier Polge, Carlos Benaim and Domitille Berthier Olfactive Family: Floral One Flowerbomb was sold every minute in the U.S. in 2021. Viktor + Rolf Flowerbomb Courtesy Photo The Greatest Fragrances, Alphabetically Acqua di Parma Colonia Launched: 1916 Perfumer: Carlo Magnani Olfactive Family: Citrus Developed by house founder Magnani as his own personal perfume, Colonia’s bottle was introduced in 1930 and has remained unchanged since its introduction.

Annick Goutal Eau d’Hadrien Launched: 1981 Perfumer: Annick Goutal Olfactive Family: Citrus The debut fragrance for Annick Goutal’s namesake company was inspired by her memories of reading Memoirs of Hadrian in Italy. Aramis Launched: 1964 Perfumer: Bernard Chant Olfactive Family: Chypre leather Fact: Created by Estée Lauder, Aramis was the first U.S.

prestige men’s scent. Bath and Body Works Cherry Blossom Launched: 2005 Perfumer: Harry Fremont Olfactive Family: Floral Woody Although not tracked by prestige indexes, this marked Bath and Body Works’ thrust to “trade up” in the fragrance world and is said to be the bestselling scent in America for the last 20 years.

Bulgari Eau Parfumée Au Thé Vert Launched: 1992 Perfumer: Jean-Claude Ellena Olfactive Family: Citrus aromatic floral Never intended for public sale, Bulgari wanted a fragrance to offer its jewelry clients when entering its stores as a gesture of hospitality. After it grew in popularity, Bulgari decided to offer it for sale.

Kilian Paris Good Girl Gone Bad Launched: 2011 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas Olfactive Family: Fruity floral The fragrance is a metaphor for the story of Eve, a good girl gone bad when she ate the forbidden fruit. Kilian Paris Love Don’t Be Shy Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Calice Becker Olfactive Family: Gourmand floral The brand’s number-one fragrance in North America.

Byredo Gypsy Water Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Jerome Epinette Olfactive Family: Woody Star hairstylist Jen Atkin tapped this to create her first collaboration for her hair care line, Ouai. The resulting products sold out in 24 hours. Byredo Mojave Ghost Launched: 2014 Perfumer: Jerome Epinette Olfactive Family: Woody The top-selling luxury scent in the U.S.

for 2021. Cacharel Anais Anais Launched: 1978 Perfumer: Paul Leger, Raymond Chaillan, Robert Gonnon and Roger Pellegrino Olfactive Family: Floral green “The first fragrance for every young girl in Europe for 40 years,” was an oft-repeated refrain from The Greatest’s voters.

Calvin Klein Eternity Launched: 1988 Perfumer: Sophia Grojsman Olfactive Family: Floral spicy Supermodel Christy Turlington was the face of Eternity at launch — and remains so. Last year, one bottle was sold every 22 seconds. Calvin Klein Obsession Launched: 1985 Perfumer: Jean Guichard, Givaudan Olfactive Family: Amber spicy Kate Moss was just 18 years old when she was photographed by her then-boyfriend, Mario Sorrenti, for the iconic Obsession campaign.

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Carolina Herrera Good Girl Launched: 2016 Perfumer: Louise Turner Olfactive Family: Floral According to research from LookFantastic, which analyzed Google searches across the globe, Good Girl is the most popular across the entire globe since its 2016.

  • Cartier Declaration Launched: 1998 Perfumer: Jean-Claude Ellena Olfactive Family: Spicy woody The streamlined bottle’s design was inspired by the crown of a Cartier watch.
  • Chanel Bleu Launched: 2010 Perfumer: Jacques Polge Olfactive Family: Aromatic woody The top-selling men’s scent on sites include Macy’s and Sephora was also the second bestselling fragrance in the U.S.

in 2021, according to data from NPD. Chanel Chance Launched: 2002 Perfumer: Jacques Polge Olfactive Family: Floral Inspired by Coco Chanel’s belief in the power of talismans and good luck charms, the cap — in the shape of a dice — reflects the lucky theme.

Chanel Cristalle Launched: 1974 Perfumer: Henri Robert Olfactive Family: Citrus floral The scent was inspired by the chandeliers in Chanel’s famous Rue Cambon apartment in the Ritz Paris. Chanel No 19 Launched: 1971 Perfumer: Henri Robert Olfactive Family: Green floral Created for Coco Chanel herself in 1971, this was her personal favorite and initially reserved only for herself and a few select friends.

Chloe Launched: 2008 Perfumer: Michel Almairac Olfactive Family: Powdery floral Fact: More than 20 million bottles sold since launch, with more than 4.6 million meters of ribbon used for the bow on the neck. Clinique Calyx (FKA Prescriptives) Launched: 1986 Perfumer: Sophia Grojsman Olfactive Family: Floral fruity There was purposely no advertising at launch, and even retailers were asked not to advertise it or spray it so that the scent didn’t become too mainstream.

  • Clinique Happy Launched: 1997 Perfumer: Rodrigo Flores Roux and Jean Claude Delville Olfactive Family: Floral fruity Clinique used mood mapping to develop Happy (which took 111 tests to create), asking panelists to smell fragrances and match them with emotions.
  • Comme des Garcons 2 Launched: 1999 Perfumer: Mark Buxton Olfactive Family: Chypre, mossy woods Inspired by Japanese sumi (calligraphy) ink, CDG2 plays on the contrast between dark and light, reflection and opacity.

Creed Aventus Launched: 2010 Perfumer: Olivier Creed Olfactive Family: Dry woods/fresh/fruity Fact: The bestselling scent globally in Creed’s history, Aventus was created by sixth generation master perfumer Olivier Creed. Davidoff Cool Water Launched:1988 Perfumer: Pierre Bourdon Olfactive Family: Fresh marine Bourdon modified the traditional fougère accord to create a fresh alternative that had immediate appeal.

Demeter Dirt Launched: 1996 Perfumer: Christopher Brosius Olfactive Family: N/A Dirt was inspired by Brosius’ Pennsylvania farm. Another location would have resulted in a different scent, he said, as dirt can smell radically different from place to place. Dior Diorissimo Launched: 1956 Perfumer: Edmond Roudnitska Olfactive Family: Floral One of Dior’s oldest scents, the name Diorissimo is still associated with modern house creations, particularly a top-handled tote of the same name.

Dior Fahrenheit Launched: 1988 Perfumer: Jean-Louis Sieuzac Olfactive Family: Leather wood Maurice Roger, then the chairman of Parfums Dior, was inspired by James Rosenquist’s picture, Fahrenheit, 1982, which he saw on exhibit in New York. Dior Miss Dior Launched: 1947 Perfumer: Paul Vacher Olfactive Family: Chypre floral The scent was first sprayed on Feb.12, 1947, but didn’t go on sale until Christmas.

  1. A card was sent out to clients and journalists announcing its launch on Dec.17.
  2. Diptyque Philosykos Launched: 1996 Perfumer: Olivia Giacobetti Olfactive Family: Woody The Maison’s founders bought a box with a dried fig leaf atop small numbered packets as a gift after a summer in Greece.
  3. Years later, the scents of fig remained just as dense as ever and became the inspiration for the fragrance.

Donna Karan Cashmere Mist Launched: 1994 Perfumer: Nicholas Calderone Olfactive Family: Floral amber The scent was born out of the success of Cashmere Mist scented body collection. It was awarded the Fragrance Foundation Hall of Fame Award in 2019. Escentric Molecules Molecule 01 Launched: 2006 Perfumer: Geza Schoen Olfactive Family: N/A Launched at Harvey Nichols, where it sold out immediately and garnered a waiting list, Molecule 01 is still the retailer’s top-selling fragrance.

  • Estée Lauder Beautiful Launched: 1985 Perfumer: Bernard Chant, Max Gavarry and Sophia Grosjman Olfactive Family: Lush floral At launch, Estée Lauder had a bride walk down Fifth Avenue in New York City, one of the first stunt-marketing activations.
  • Estée Lauder Pleasures Launched: 1995 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas, Annie Buzantian Olfactive Family: Sheer floral Responsible for introducing the sheer floral category, Pleasures was inducted into the Fragrance Foundation Hall of Fame in 2021.

And who could forget the puppies. Estée Lauder Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Harry Fremont Olfactive Family: Lush floral Aerin Lauder created this as an homage to her grandmother’s 1973 launch of Private Collection and their shared love of those “magnificent white flowers.” Estée Lauder White Linen Launched: 1978 Perfumer: Sophia Grosjman Olfactive Family: Lush floral The name White Linen came about because Estée Lauder envisioned the woman who would wear it as “fresh, crisp and clean.” Ex Nihilo Fleur Narcotique Launched: 2013 Perfumer: Quentin Bisch Olfactive Family: Floral fruity Bisch was only 28 when he created this scent, which has since become a house icon and global cult classic.

  1. Fracas by Robert Piguet Launched: 1948 Perfumer: Germaine Cellier Olfactive Family: Floral “So powerfully white flower,” said a voter, this has a “creaminess and dark intensity that is unexpected,” another said.
  2. Frédéric Malle Musc Ravageur Launched: 2000 Perfumer: Maurice Roucel Olfactive Family: “Magnetic warmth” Malle calls this “sex in a bottle,” noting it is the one “that provokes our clients to return the most.” Giorgio Beverly Hills Launched: 1981 Perfumer: Francis Camail and Harry Cutler Olfactive Family: White floral The fragrance that defined a decade — “quintessential ‘80s opulence,” a voter said.

Glossier You Launched: 2017 Perfumer: Dora Baghriche, Frank Voelkl Olfactive Family: Floral woody musk This scent, “which smells like you only better,” said a voter, sold one bottle every five minutes in 2021. Gucci Bloom Launched: 2017 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas Olfactive Family: White floral Gucci’s first female scent developed under designer Alessandro Michele’s creative vision.

  1. Guerlain Habit Rouge Launched: 1965 Perfumer: Jean-Paul Guerlain Olfactive Family: Amber woody Created to draw men to the perfume counter, this takes the basic outline of Shalimar and adds leather and green orange blossom for a less sweet version of the original.
  2. Guerlain L’Heure Bleu Launched: 1912 Perfumer: Jacques Guerlain Olfactive Family: N/A Designed by Raymond Guerlain, the “inverted heart” bottle features a stopper, in the form of a hollowed heart, a true technical feat at the time.

Guerlain Samsara Launched: 1989 Perfumer: Jean-Paul Guerlain Olfactive Family: Amber woody Inspired by Guerlain’s passion for the dressage of horses. Guerlian Vetiver Launched: 1959 Perfumer: Jean-Paul Guerlain Olfactive Family: N/A The first fragrance by Jean-Paul Guerlain, grandson of house founder, Jacques, who would create more than 30 scents launched by the house during his lifetime.

  1. Guy Laroche Drakkar Noir Launched:1982 Perfumer: Pierre Wargnye Olfactive Family: Fougère Wargnye used dihydromyrcenol for the first time in a fine fragrance.
  2. Previously, the molecule was primarily used for household and cleaning products.
  3. Halston Launched: 1975 Perfumer: Bernard Chant Olfactive Family: Floral chypre While the Elsa Peretti-designed flacon is considered an icon of perfumery today, Max Factor execs loathed it on sight, calling it “the blob.” Also revolutionary: Its lack of branding, featuring instead only a ribbon with Halston’s name.

Heretic The Herbalist Launched: 2021 Perfumer: Douglas Little Olfactive Family: Fougère sauvage The first fine fragrance to contain cannabis-derived THC, this combines the aromatherapeutic benefits of herbs, woods and flowers with the psychoactive effects of cannabis and is sold only in dispensaries.

  • Hermès Terre d’Hermès Launched: 2006 Perfumer: Jean-Claude Ellena Olfactive Family: Spicy Dry “Warm and woodsy.
  • I love it on my husband, I mean really love,” said one respondent.
  • But I love it on me, too.” Houbigant Quelques Fleurs Launched: 1912 Perfumer: Robert Bienaimé Olfactive Family: Floral It takes more than 15,000 to create one ounce of Quelques Fleurs, which bills itself as the first floral fragrance ever created.

Hugo Boss Bottled Launched: 1998 Perfumer: Annick Menardo Olfactive Family: Woody fruity With notes of apple and cinnamon, this was inspired by apple strudel. It remains Boss’ bestselling scent. Jean Paul Gaultier Classique Launched: 1993 Perfumer: Jacques Cavallier Olfactive Family: Amber floral From the bottle to the scent itself, an instant icon since launch.

Jean Paul Gaultier Le Male Launched: 1995 Perfumer: Francis Kurkdjian Olfactive Family: Amber fougère Created to be an alternative to traditional colognes, five bottles are sold every minute worldwide. Jo Malone London English Pear and Freesia Launched: 2010 Perfumer: Christine Nagel Olfactive Family: Fruity The scent was inspired by the image conjured up of an English autumn in the poem, “To Autumn,” by poet John Keats.

Jo Malone London Sage Wood and Sea Salt Launched: 2014 Perfumer: Christine Nagel Olfactive Family: Woody This bestseller was inspired by the blustery environment of British beaches. Jo Malone Peony and Blush Suede Launched: 2013 Perfumer: Christine Nagel Olfactive Family: Floral Suede was used as a textural note to offset the richness of the peony.

  1. Juicy Couture Viva La Juicy Launched: 2008 Perfumer: Honorine Blanc Olfactive Family: Floral gourmand woody Viva La Juicy was the first scent to introduce the concept of “fluffy” texture, with its carmelized gardenia accord.
  2. Enzo Flower by Kenzo Launched: 2000 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas Olfactive Family: Powdery floral Two decades on, Kenzo Flower is still going strong, with four bottles sold every minute worldwide.

Lancôme La Vie Est Belle Launched: 2012 Perfumer: Anne Flipo and Dominique Ropion Olfactive Family: Floral and sweet Development took three years and 5,521 ingredient trials; today, one bottle is sold every 10 seconds globally. Lancôme Trésor Launched: 1990 Perfumer: Sophia Grojsman Olfactive Family: Warm spicy Since its original launch creation in 1952, Trésor’s bottle has had four variations; it draws inspiration from luxury glass-making and high-end jewelry.

  • Le Labo Another 13 Launched: 2010 Perfumer: Nathalie Lorson Olfactive Family: Musk Retailer Sarah Andelman of Colette spearheaded a collaboration between Le Labo and Jefferson Hack of AnOther Magazine.
  • The 13 refers to the number of ingredients used to create the scent.
  • It is Le Labo’s only fragrance without the main ingredient in its name.

Marc Jacobs Daisy Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Alberto Morillas Olfactive Family: Fruity floral green The Great Gatsby’s Daisy Buchanan was the inspiration behind the name for Jacobs, who loved her combination of fragility, beauty and elegance. Nina Ricci L’Air du Temps Launched: 1948 Perfumer: Francis Fabron Olfactive Family: Floral The scent symbolized the hope for peace after WWII, as reflected by the original flacon design of a sun with a dove perched on the stopper by Christian Bérard.

Paco Rabanne 1 Million Launched: 2008 Perfumer: Christophe Raynaud, Olivier Pescheux and Michel Girard Olfactive Family: N/A Called by some “the sexiest scent on earth,” 1 Million went through more than 2,000 iterations before the perfumers landed on the final scent. Paloma Picasso Launched: 1984 Perfumer: Francis Bocris Olfactive Family: Chypre floral woody The daughter of Picasso starred in the debut ads, her jet black hair and red lips echoing the color scheme of the scent.

For her, black symbolized power and red was her favorite hue. Penhaligon Halfeti Launched: 2015 Perfumer: Christian Provenzano Olfactive Family: N/A Named after a small Turkish village, where rare black roses — the result of unique ecological conditions — bloom on the banks of the Euphrates river.

Philosophy Amazing Grace Launched: 1996 Perfumer: Tanya Petrakov Olfactive Family: Floral musk A sales powerhouse: The number-one women’s fragrance ancillaries brand in the U.S. in unit sales, according to NPD, with one sold every 30 seconds in 2020. Ralph Lauren Polo Launched: 1978 Perfumer: Carlos Benaim Olfactive Family: N/A The first men’s fragrance without any floral notes, this launched simultaneously with a sister scent, Lauren for women, an industry first at the time.

Rochas Femme Rochas Launched: 1944 Perfumer: Edmond Roudnitska Olfactive Family: Chypre fruity “A classic, clean and fresh scent that is almost impossible to find anymore, making all the more lust worthy,” said a voter, echoing a common refrain. Serge Lutens Feminité du Bois Launched: 1992 Perfumer: Serge Lutens Olfactive Family: Spicy wood The fragrance was originally created by Lutens for Shiseido and is now sold under Luten’s namesake brand.

  1. Thierry Mugler Alien Launched: 2005 Perfumer: Dominique Ropion and Laurent Bruyere Olfactive Family: Amber floral Mugler and fragrance exec Vera Strubi wanted a name that started with A and had five letters, like Angel to “bring luck.” It worked: Today, 23 units are still sold every hour worldwide.
  2. Tom Ford F*cking Fabulous Launched: 2017 Perfumer: Shyamala Maisondieu Olfactive Family: Amber leather As one respondent wrote, “Name says it all.” Tom Ford Neroli Portofino Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Rodrigo Flores-Roux Olfactive Family: Citrus floral A reinvention of the classic European style eau de cologne, this helped modernize the citrus category with its floral notes and contrasting amber undertones.

Tom Ford Ombre Leather Launched: 2018 Perfumer: Sonia Constant Olfactive Family: Floral leather The leather note wrapped in wood, spices and flowers led to instant success for this launch. Tom Ford Oud Wood Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Richard Herpin Olfactive Family: Woody Ford led the way in creating an oud-based fragrance equally as appealing to Western and Eastern consumers.

  • Tom Ford Soleil Blanc Launched: 2016 Perfumer: Nathalie Cetto Olfactive Family: Amber floral Coco de mer, cardamom and ylang ylang combine for a unique scent that “conjures up like luxe summer holidays,” one voter said.
  • Tom Ford Tobacco Vanille Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Olivier Gillotin Olfactive Family: Amber spicy One of the original Tom Ford Private Blend fragrances, this helped spark the niche juggernaut.

Tom Ford Tuscan Leather Launched: 2007 Perfumer: Harry Frémont and Jacques Cavallier-Belletrud Olfactive Family: Leather “The first fragrance to bridge Western and Middle Eastern style,” said a voter of this bestseller. “Launched a thousand inspirations from this unique note.” YSL Black Opium Launched: 2014 Perfumer: Nathalie Lorson, Marie Salamagne, Olivier Cresp and Honorine Blanc Olfactive Family: Gourmand The bestseller that was the first to use a coffee note “took the classic Opium skeleton and reimagined it into a new classic with its famous top note,” a voter said.
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How do you wear an oud fragrance?

Steps to Applying Oud – The Scent Blog Oud oil bottles are designed just for the purpose of applying Oud. It is made from glass and sealed with a thin plastic stick. It is then closed with a circular cover. The plastic stick is not squeezable, rather simply a stick that is soaked with oil. Applying Oud also has its own special steps.

It’s not advisable to apply oud on the palm of your hand because that particular part touches everything, which can cause staining on things and clothes. Oud is usually applied in places with a pulse. On the wrists, sides of the neck, and behind the ears. These places are warm and the heat activates the scent to last longer.

When applying, gently swipe the stick across, making a line. You can rub the oil using your index finger to spread it around the area.

Since Oud oil can wear off, the best timing to apply Oud is directly before an event. Perhaps in your car, before you leave.

People will be amazed by your unique fragrance, while the scent lingers through the air for quite some time. Leaving you and everyone around you want to smell more! August 15, 2018 | View: 6887 : Steps to Applying Oud – The Scent Blog
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Is oud the most expensive perfume?

The 6 Most Expensive Perfume Ingredients in the World Gucci Oud (or “oudh”) comes from the wood of a wild tropical tree called the agar. No biggie, right? Well, the wood has to become infected with a type of mold called “Phialophora parasitica,” which causes the wood to produce oud, a dark, extremely fragrant resin.

Apparently, only 2 percent of agar trees produce oud, making it incredibly precious. And therefore, expensive. Due to its rarity, high demand, and the difficulty of harvesting it, oud oil is one of the most expensive oils in the world. At one point, its value was estimated to be 1.5 times of the value of gold, and it is sometimes referred to as “liquid gold.” reports that the essential oil, used in perfumes, can sell for more than $5,000 a pound.

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Oud has been popular in the Middle East for centuries and is enjoying a boom here in the West with more and more brands creating oud fragrances. But they all come at a price. fragrance will set you back ​$137., a favorite, costs $340. : The 6 Most Expensive Perfume Ingredients in the World
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Why do Arabs love oud?

The Middle East’s Signature Scent – As you guys have probably guessed, here in the Middle East we don’t mess around when it comes to fragrance. And of course, we couldn’t talk about Middle Eastern fragrances without mentioning the region’s signature scent – oud, which is possibly one of the most intense, luxurious aromas ever.

  1. The potent smell comes from agarwood trees that are infected with a particular type of mold– again, EW! Men typically wear the fragrance independently and women will mix it with scents like rose and jasmine to add a feminine, and seductive flare.
  2. Although, a lot of oud fragrances are actually considered unisex.

Culturally, the wood is burned like incense as a sign of respect and hospitality when guests enter the house, and powerful Sultans would use it to scent their homes as it has aphrodisiac properties and is said to be one of the most potent essential oils.
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Do people like smelling oud?

It’s strong, it’s musky and almost animalistic in its sensuality. Some people love it while others find it offensive and gross. We’re not talking about durian, the beloved but smelly southeast Asian fruit but oud – one of the most expensive raw scent ingredients in the world. Already a subscriber? Sign in

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Known as oud (or oudh), it comes from the wood of the Southeast Asian agar (aquilaria) tree. When the wood becomes infected with a particular type of mold, the tree reacts by producing a dark, scented resin, which is often called “liquid gold.” “Oud” is used to refer to both the resin-saturated wood (the agarwood) as well as the oil distilled from it.

One reason oud is so expensive is its rarity; by some estimates, fewer than 2% of wild agar trees produce it. Experts claim that the very best oud comes from the oldest trees, which are even more scarce. It can sell for $5,000 a pound – or more. According to the International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences, oud oil can cost as much as £20,000 per kilogram (more than $30,000) depending on its purity.

“Oud is astonishingly rare,” says Chandler Burr, the former New York Times perfume critic and author of The Emperor of Scent, “It has a very particular scent and there is nothing like it on the market. It’s dark, rich and opaque.” The scent is an ancient one that has been used for thousands of years in the Middle East and Asia both at home and in religious ceremonies.

The International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences states that agarwood, also known as the “Wood of the Gods,” is mentioned as early as the third century AD in ancient China. In the Middle East, where oud is most common, it is considered a cultural touchstone and highly prestigious. “Oud is so ubiquitous in the Middle East,” says Burr.

“Anyone there can recognize its scent immediately.” Oud is used in wooden incense chips, body oils and fragrance, and is now becoming more popular in the West. According to the NPD Group, sales of oud perfumes are going strong within the prestige fragrance market, which is valued at $3 billion.

A 2013 report stated that total oud sales were up by 68%. In the last few years, both boutique and larger companies have launched fragrances with oud, including Maison Francis Kurkdjian whose Oud Velvet Mood contains cinnamon from Ceylon and oud from Laos and retails for €275 (approximately $298). There’s also Kilian’s Rose Oud ($395) and Christian Dior’s Oud Ispahan ($300), which contains labdanum absolute (also known as Rose of Sharon) and Leather Oud, which contains gaiac wood, cedar and sandalwood.

Many of these scents are unisex and are not for the shy and understated. Krigler’s Oud for Highness 75 was created in 1975 for King Hussein of Jordan ($565). Indeed, oud is closely associated with royalty. The British press reported that Prince William was gifted a bespoke scent on his wedding day that contained oud.
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Is Oud Wood Manly?

One might argue that Tom Ford ushered in the new dawn of oud fragrances — whether or not anyone wanted it — when he launched M7 for YSL fragrances in 2002. And, judging by the latter’s market bomb, no-one did want it. M7 was not just a trail-blazer and the first of its kind; it was also too original, unique, bold and, it seems, shocking for a world dominated by the freshness of (the revolting) Acqua di Gio. When Tom Ford left YSL and began his own fashion line, it’s hardly surprising that he tried to remedy what may have been his first official failure. He returned to the oud well and launched Private Blend Oud Wood in 2007. Only, this time, he tried to make the oud (or agarwood) palatable, approachable and mild for the mainstream masses.

(To read more about agarwood, you can turn to the Glossary, or to my post on the oud trend linked up above.) And, he succeeded. Oud Wood is lovely and infinitely easy to wear, especially by the standards of many other agarwood fragrances in the market today. The reason is that — at the end of the day — Oud Wood is not a very oud fragrance at all.

This is no nuclear Montale — a niche perfume house that has around 27 oud fragrances, all of which radiate post-apocalyptic intensity. And it’s not M7 either, a much sweeter, more potent, hard-core treatment of the subject. Though I’ve only tried the reformulated version of M7, I have to admit, I far preferred it to Tom Ford’s second foray into agarwood.

Oud Wood is a unisex perfume which Fragrantica categorizes as “Oriental Spicy.” On his website, Tom Ford describes it as follows: Exotic Rose Wood and Cardamom, blended with exuberant Chinese Pepper, envelop the wearer in warmth. Eventually, the center exposes a smokey blend of rare Oud Wood, Sandalwood and Vetiver.

Finally, the creamy scents of Tonka Bean, Vanilla and Amber are revealed. The full set of notes according to Now Smell This (NST) are: rosewood, cardamom, Chinese pepper, oud, sandalwood, vetiver, tonka bean, vanilla and amber. Oud Wood opens softly. Extremely softly for a Tom Ford fragrance, if I might add.

It may be the softest opening I’ve ever experienced for one of his perfumes — Private Blend or regular collection! The very first impression is of rose and sweet, nutty cardamom. It’s lovely. There is also Szechuan pepper, earthy vetiver, and hints of rich vanilla as if from a freshly cut Madagascar bean.

Following in their footsteps is the faintly medicinal tones of oud. There is no huge bite to the oud, and I don’t think it’s mutedness is due to the fact that it is covered by a veil of spice and sweetness. Even putting aside the unique nature of Montale’s fragrances, the oud here is different to others that I have smelled.

For example, the By Kilian oud fragrances in the Arabian Nights collection range from cold, stony oud in Pure Oud to almost no oud at all in Amber Oud, Tom Ford’s Oud Wood may be closest to Rose Oud with its rose and soft agarwood, but there is still a difference that is hard to explain. It’s as if the oud has been hidden here such that it’s merely providing small cameo performances here or there.

It’s not the star, but it’s also not one of the main supporting actors either. Thirty minutes in, it remains a fragrance that is predominantly rose, cardamom and oud. The latter has become slightly more prominent now with a heavier element of camphor. Its chilly undertones provide a balance to the rose notes that are frequently present in oud fragrances.

  • And the combination of oud with the nutty, aromatic, sweetness of cardamom is absolutely gorgeous.
  • But, despite that, Oud Wood is still much less sweet, and much dryer, than the (reformulated) version of M7.
  • And, frankly, I think I would have preferred a little more sweetness.
  • It’s around this time that there is an unexpected twist: I’m convinced I smell mocha! Something in the interplay of the nutty, sweet cardamom with the agarwood and the earthy rootiness of the vetiver has led to a strong impression of mocha ice cream.

I’m an enormous fan of the latter, so I’m very happy (though somewhat perplexed). Yet, despite that surprise, Oud Wood isn’t a particularly complex or complicated fragrance. It doesn’t morph or fundamentally change in a huge way, but perhaps that’s why it’s such an easy fragrance to wear.

  1. About two hours in, the vetiver starts to truly emerge and it remains prominent for the length of the perfume’s development.
  2. Oud Wood is now primarily a vetiver, cardamom and (vaguely) oud fragrance with the rose becoming increasingly fainter.
  3. At the three-hour mark, sandalwood makes its appearance, pushing the rose completely off the stage and blending with the vanilla, cardamom and the earthy vetiver in a truly lovely manner.

At times, it seems as though Oud Wood is mainly a vanilla vetiver with hints of oud and spice. At other times, it’s mostly sandalwood with vetiver. The perfume fluctuates and undulates, showing just how well-blended it is. “The Seine at Le Grande Jatte” by George Seurat. Four hours in, the perfume is extremely close to the skin and predominantly sandalwood with vetiver. The latter is increasingly sweet, fresh and bright green, reminding me of the aromatic fragrancy of lemongrass more than anything earthy or dark.

  1. It’s lovely, especially when combined with the spiced creaminess of the sandalwood.
  2. There are faint traces of vanilla and tonka, and the oud occasionally pops up like a fleeting Jack in the Box, but those are all minor things.
  3. The dry-down is mostly just sandalwood and vetiver.
  4. I’m truly taken aback by the moderate sillage and brevity of the perfume.

The projection is surprisingly mild and tame for a Tom Ford fragrance. Even more surprising, it has an unusually shortest duration: around 5.5 hours on my skin. I know I have peculiar skin, but I’m not alone in this one. From the review on NST to comments on Fragrantica, a large number of people have noted the average (or, for a Tom Ford, extremely below-average ) projection, softness and mildness of the fragrance.

On Fragrantica, there are repeated comments about how Oud Wood simply doesn’t last. (It’s enough to make one convinced that Tom Ford intentionally went to the exact opposite extreme of every single thing he did with M7.) My greater difficulty, and one which has made this review a struggle to write, is that Oud Wood is hard to get extremely excited about.

Please don’t mistake me, it’s an absolutely lovely fragrance and, if I had a full bottle, I would wear it. In fact, I would probably wear it frequently! It’s versatile, easy, uncomplicated, rich-smelling and that sandalwood dry-down is simply delicious.

Oud Wood may even be my second favorite Tom Ford Private Blend fragrance. (I shall have to ponder that one.) But it’s simply not remarkable. It’s hard to muster up enormous excitement for what is — by today’s standards in particular — a very average oud. I’m not criticizing it for that, especially as “average” was the express goal! Tom Ford already did “remarkable,” and fell on his tush.

Personally, I’m still obsessed with smelling un-reformulated, original M7 but, since both it and the reformulated version have been discontinued, I’m out of luck for the moment. (It sometimes appears on eBay, so there is always hope.) For those of you who have been unsuccessful with agarwood thus far but who really want to find an accessible oud to try, Tom Ford’s Oud Wood should be right up your alley.

It’s really just a spiced, vanilla, vetiver, woody fragrance that simply happens to have some oud in it. It’s neither particularly sweet nor masculine. But it’s infinitely wearable, far from potent, very approachable, and utterly delicious at times. For those of you who have been previously traumatized by the bullying or “frat boy” aspects of some Tom Fords, you too may have better luck with this one.

But if you’ve had greater exposure to the plethora of ouds on the market or are looking for a true agarwood fragrance, then this may be too tame for you.
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Which is better oud wood or oud wood intense?

Projection – This one isn’t even close. Oud Wood Intense has a bomb-like sillage. It is loud and can project itself like crazy, off of a few sprays. Oud Wood is more of a moderate, then, a lighter scent after some time has past. Edge: Intense
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Is oud wood the same as sandalwood?

Is sandalwood the new oud? – For the past years many perfumers in the West used ‘oud’ with its intoxicating musky scent as a base to create some amazing fragrances for men and women. But now it’s time for something new: sandalwood. Whereas ‘oud’ is one of the most expensive perfume ingredients in the world, sandalwood is one of the oldest and rarest perfume ingredients.

  1. And it appears that sandal perfumes are some new trend.
  2. Text and pictures: Anja Van Der Borght Oud versus sandalwood? Oud comes from the wood of the tropical Agar (Aquilaria) tree and has a strong musky scent whereas sandalwood is a class of woods from trees in the genus Santalum that generates a warm en woody smell.

Unlike many other aromatic woods, sandalwood retains its fragrance for decades. But be careful it is not because you like musky scents that you will like the strong oud or because you like sandalwood in your living room that you will like any sandalwood fragrance on your skin or that of your partner. This elegant fragrance swears by the traditions of Colonia and starts with a burst of citrus but introduces a surprise element in the form of harmonious contrasts. The fragrance unfolds with a perfectly balanced combination of the fresh and sunny notes of bergamot, lemon, orange and petitgrain that reflect the authentic spirit of Colonia.

  1. Petit grain is an oil extracted from the leaves and green twigs of the bitter orange tree, which brings an odour similar to orange blossom but with more pronounced citrus and green facets.
  2. Together they create a positive and sunny opening.
  3. Then Colonia Sandalo evolves into an intoxicating olfactory composition of cardamom and lavender buds that bloom in an elegantly aromatic and creamy heart.

Lavender is traditionally used quite widely in masculine perfumery. For Colonica Sandalo the sweeter elements of the lavender are toned down by the addition of cardamom, a spice that really gives the purple flower a rocky, rugged feel. This unparalleled prelude leads us to the original elegance of the base, where the precious and creamy balsamic tones of Indian sandalwood that are quite massively present warm up to the well-rounded tones of tonka bean and amber. Colonia Sandalo is packaged in the iconic art deco bottle and available in two volumes: the classic 100 ml vial and the larger, more impressive 180 ml variant. Both formats are packaged in a box that is completely hand-wrapped in fine paper in distinguished tobacco shades. An original reinterpretation of the iconic Acqua di Parma perfume, Colonia Sandalo is the new and luxurious Eau de Cologne Concentrée by Acqua di Parma. Available in 100 ml and 180 ml. : Is sandalwood the new oud? –
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What is oud similar to?

The oud is very similar to other types of lute, and to Western lutes.
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